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Grandview at Las Vegas: Deedback, Give away or stop paying MF ?

Fredflintstone

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I have referred to this as being hoodwinked
@dgalati, My reasoning to having a buyer/seller lawyer is because I am shocked at the number of people who don’t read. They just sign. IMO, having a lawyer clearly outline the terms, commitment and depth of what they are about to do is helpful. Also, if promises were made, a lawyer can remind the client that perhaps they need to be added to the contract prior to execution. At least, they cannot say they were hoodwinked and clearly know their rights and responsibilities. My guess is that many wouldn’t enter into a timeshare agreement in the first place after having a discussion with a solid Contract or Real Estate lawyer. Or, at a minimum, ensure all promises made are in the contract. In my view, it’s added protection. Kind of like buying an insurance policy.

I just hate this impulsive, back room signing process where it seems many folks feel they have been harmed. It saddens me when we push “well you signed” argument when folks feel cheated. Added mechanisms need to be in place to minimize people from feeling taken.

I am not implying that people need an attorney because they are dumb. They need one to double check their rights and responsibilities. I know a timeshare lawyer who always tells me, “if they just read the contract before execution they may not be so angry and feel duped.”

I would even argue that a lawyer is not needed as long as there is a system that ensures people know clearly what they are signing and committing to over the long haul. Then, their decision to go ahead is purely informed choice. We can’t rely on those on the timeshare sales floor to do that. They have another agenda in mind and that’s selling intervals.

No wonder the timeshare industry as an image challenge.




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Fredflintstone

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Believe me when I say this there are many agents of Wyndham trolling the Tug Wyndham board
I agree. I learned a new term from CalGalTraveler and you. TROLL. Gee, I’m not internet savvy like you.

I would guess there may be trolls with other resort systems too. I’m not sure how you stop it though. I suppose it’s part of the course.


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Jan M.

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Tamarac, FL
Resorts Owned
Wyndham Presidential Reserve at Panama City Beach, Wyndham Grand Desert, Wyndham Waikiki Beach Walk, Wyndham National Harbor, Club Wyndham Access
Grandview Las Vegas and Discovery Beach Resort - Both in RCI Points
I've never tried to hide that we bought developer and not just Wyndham either. Nor that Wyndham salespeople "fixed" problems for us by selling us more points. After finding TUG I learned about Owner Care and now know we most likely had other options. In the second half of 2010, 2011 and the first half of 2012 we could have been in the shoes other people are in with losing their timeshares or walking away.

I've told about that time in our lives but what I've never said is just how difficult a time it was for us when my husband got "retired" by his then company. On my 59th birthday just 5 weeks short of him turning 61. His then company was making cuts in order to sell the company. It meant that he wouldn't be able to collect the full retirement as he needed a few more years with them. I had no benefits but made enough to pay the bills and feed us. It was the increased cost of the health insurance when COBRA ran out in a few months that I didn't make enough to cover. We were older first time parents, our son had another year of college to go and was getting married on my husband's birthday. This couldn't have come at a much worse time and we were in no way financially prepared.

But that wasn't the worst of it by far. My husband had always worked even as a teenager and was completely devastated at losing his job. He was depressed and I wasn't seeing just how bad it was nor for how long it went on. He kept telling me he was fired which wasn't true at all. To get him to stop saying that I got him to agree that he wouldn't tell anyone about him losing his job until after the wedding so our personal issues didn't overshadow our son and DIL's wedding. He took on planning and preparing the food for their rehearsal dinner. That gave him something else to focus on and he was glad to be able to do it because it took a lot of strain off me. I was working 50-60 hours a week and sometimes even more. After their wedding he started really hunting for another job and easily found one. Yes it was in Florida and yes we really, really wanted to get away from the Northwest Pennsylvania winters but it wasn't a job he was thrilled about taking. He went to work for the State of Florida and they pay very poorly. He made 50% of what he previously made and that increased his sense of failure. Something I wasn't aware of until a little over a year later a competitor of his old company sought him out and he was back to making what he used to.

And it gets worse. For a little over 6 months that he was in Florida on his own I was back in PA. We talked daily but it isn't the same as having your spouse there. We got through house hunting and in the weeks following when we were waiting to close I fell at work and was laid up for months afterwards. Moving our belongings was an unmitigated disaster in every aspect of it. I don't allow myself to dwell on it as it is one of those things you just have to let go of because there is nothing you can do about it now.

There are two good things I then and now hang on to from that time after my husband lost his job. One is my instant and unwavering belief that my husband losing his job meant other, better doors were going to open for us. And they did. The other is related to our timeshares. My husband lived out of them for 4 months and 1 week from the time he arrived in Florida to start the job until a week after we closed on our house. Financially that was a lifesaver! I convinced him to give the job a try by telling him that thanks to the timeshares we weren't shelling out any money for a place for him to stay if he took the job. We didn't have to put down any deposits or commit to a lease. If he didn't like the job he could quit and just stay and enjoy whatever days remained inside of the 15 day cancellation window. That him trying the job was costing us nothing but the gas money to get down there.

Bear with me because there is a little more to the story. At the time my husband lost his job we were platinum Wyndham owners which means we owned over a million points with them and we had another timeshare in RCI. The maintenance fees seemed like a crippling expense we surely didn't need at that time. I have always managed our money and paid the bills so my stress level was through the roof. After all that we'd spent to buy what we had the idea of losing it all was heartbreaking. So I gave up what little free time I had with working 50-60 hour work weeks and gave up some desperately needed sleep time too to learn how to rent and do all the work renting involves. I didn't even know point managers existed at that time or I would have gone that route. For the next several years that renting saved us from going the routes other people take.

I am happy to say that we made up for what would have been the larger amount of pension he lost because we made a commitment to save hard for those remaining years until my husband retired and instead of retiring at 65 he worked a few more years. And that probably put us farther ahead than we would have been if none of that had happened. Because my husband set his own work schedule and his territory was all of Florida south of Sarasota and Fort Pierce we were able to use our timeshares more even before he retired than many people do even after they retire. That made it very easy for him to keep working those few extra years. As as some of you know from my posts we are making even more use of our timeshares now. Home only 28 out of 155 nights from mid July to mid December.

We have far more reasons to be grateful for our timeshares than we have regrets for what we spent. Many of us have a story and that's ours!
 
Last edited:

Fredflintstone

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I've never tried to hide that we bought developer not just Wyndham either. Nor that Wyndham salespeople "fixed" problems for us by selling us more points. After finding TUG I learned about Owner Care and now know we most likely had other options. In the second half of 2010, 2011 and the first half of 2012 we could have been in the shoes other people are in with losing their timeshares or walking away.

I've told about that time in our lives but what I've never said what just how difficult a time it was for us when my husband got "retired" by his then company. On my 59th birthday just 5 weeks short of him turning 61. His then company was making n order to sell the company. It meant that he wouldn't be able to collect the full retirement as he needed a few more years with them. I had no benefits but made enough to pay the bills and feed us. It was the increased cost of the health insurance when COBRA ran out in a few months that I didn't make enough to cover. We were older first time parents, our son had another year of college to go and was getting married on my husband's birthday. This couldn't have come at a much worse time and we were in no way financially prepared.

But that wasn't the worst of it by far. My husband had always worked even as a teenager and was completely devastated at losing his job. He was depressed and I wasn't seeing just how bad it was nor for how long it went on. He kept telling me he was fired which wasn't true at all. To get him to stop saying that I got him to agree that he wouldn't tell anyone about him losing his job until after the wedding so our personal issues didn't overshadow our son and DIL's wedding. He took on planning and preparing the food for their rehearsal dinner. That gave him something else to focus on and he was glad to be able to do it because it took a lot of strain off me. I was working 50-60 hours a week and sometimes even more. After their wedding he started really hunting for another job and easily found one. Yes it was in Florida and yes we really, really wanted to get away from the Northwest Pennsylvania winters but it wasn't a job he was thrilled about taking. He went to work for the State of Florida and they pay very poorly. He made 50% of what he previously made and that increased his sense of failure. Something I wasn't aware of until a little over a year later a competitor of his old company sought him out and he was back to making what he used to.

And it gets worse. For a little over 6 months that he was in Florida on his own I was back in PA. We talked daily but it isn't the same as having your spouse there. We got through house hunting and in the weeks following when we were waiting to close I fell at work and was laid up for months afterwards. Moving our belongings was an unmitigated disaster in every aspect of it. I don't allow myself to dwell on it as it is one of those things you just have to let go of because there is nothing you can do about it now.

There are two good things I then and now hang on to from that time after my husband lost his job. One is my instant and unwavering belief that my husband losing his job meant other, better doors were going to open for us. And they did. The other is related to our timeshares. My husband lived out of them for 4 months and 1 week from the time he arrived in Florida to start the job until a week after we closed on our house. Financially that was a lifesaver! I convinced him to give the job a try by telling him that thanks to the timeshares we weren't shelling out any money for a place for him to stay if he took the job. We didn't have to put down any deposits or commit to a lease. If he didn't like the job he could quit and just stay and enjoy whatever days remained inside of the 15 day cancellation window. That him trying the job was costing us nothing but the gas money to get down there.

Bear with me because there is a little more to the story. At the time my husband lost his job we were platinum Wyndham owners which means we owned over a million points with them and we had another timeshare in RCI. The maintenance fees seemed like a crippling expense we surely didn't need at that time. I have always managed our money and paid the bills so my stress level was through the roof. After all that we'd spent to buy what we had the idea of losing it all was heartbreaking. So I gave up what little free time I had with working 50-60 hour work weeks and gave up desperately needed sleep time too to learn how to rent and do all the work renting involves. I didn't even know point managers existed at that time or I would have gone that route. For the next several years that renting saved us from going the routes other people take.

I am happy to say that we made up for the increased pension he lost because we made a commitment to save hard and instead of retiring at 65 my husband worked a few more years. Because my husband set his own work schedule and his territory was all of Florida south of Sarasota and Fort Pierce we were able to use our timeshares more even before he retired than many people do even after they retire. That made it very easy for him to keep working those few extra years. As as some of you know from my posts we are making even more use of our timeshares now. Home only 28 out of 155 nights from mid July to mid December.

We have far more reasons to be grateful for our timeshares than we have regrets for what we spent. Many of us have a story and that's ours!
Thank you for sharing such a lovely story. It’s always nice to read about folks who overcame challenges in their lives like you have. It’s challenging sometimes to gain employment in your 60s but not insurmountable.

What’s also very refreshing is how your timeshare purchases carried your through your rough and your good times.

It seems like Florida has been good to you as well. I know, if I was ready to retire, I would prefer the Sun over snow and cold.

A Happy New Year to you!


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Grammarhero

Official TUGBBS Rescission Master
TUG Lifetime Member
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Location
Washington, DC Area
Resorts Owned
Wyndham 353k pts, Williamsburg Plant 4L/4 & 2/2, DRI South Bend 1/1
I've never tried to hide that we bought developer and not just Wyndham either. Nor that Wyndham salespeople "fixed" problems for us by selling us more points. After finding TUG I learned about Owner Care and now know we most likely had other options. In the second half of 2010, 2011 and the first half of 2012 we could have been in the shoes other people are in with losing their timeshares or walking away.

I've told about that time in our lives but what I've never said what just how difficult a time it was for us when my husband got "retired" by his then company. On my 59th birthday just 5 weeks short of him turning 61. His then company was making cuts in order to sell the company. It meant that he wouldn't be able to collect the full retirement as he needed a few more years with them. I had no benefits but made enough to pay the bills and feed us. It was the increased cost of the health insurance when COBRA ran out in a few months that I didn't make enough to cover. We were older first time parents, our son had another year of college to go and was getting married on my husband's birthday. This couldn't have come at a much worse time and we were in no way financially prepared.

But that wasn't the worst of it by far. My husband had always worked even as a teenager and was completely devastated at losing his job. He was depressed and I wasn't seeing just how bad it was nor for how long it went on. He kept telling me he was fired which wasn't true at all. To get him to stop saying that I got him to agree that he wouldn't tell anyone about him losing his job until after the wedding so our personal issues didn't overshadow our son and DIL's wedding. He took on planning and preparing the food for their rehearsal dinner. That gave him something else to focus on and he was glad to be able to do it because it took a lot of strain off me. I was working 50-60 hours a week and sometimes even more. After their wedding he started really hunting for another job and easily found one. Yes it was in Florida and yes we really, really wanted to get away from the Northwest Pennsylvania winters but it wasn't a job he was thrilled about taking. He went to work for the State of Florida and they pay very poorly. He made 50% of what he previously made and that increased his sense of failure. Something I wasn't aware of until a little over a year later a competitor of his old company sought him out and he was back to making what he used to.

And it gets worse. For a little over 6 months that he was in Florida on his own I was back in PA. We talked daily but it isn't the same as having your spouse there. We got through house hunting and in the weeks following when we were waiting to close I fell at work and was laid up for months afterwards. Moving our belongings was an unmitigated disaster in every aspect of it. I don't allow myself to dwell on it as it is one of those things you just have to let go of because there is nothing you can do about it now.

There are two good things I then and now hang on to from that time after my husband lost his job. One is my instant and unwavering belief that my husband losing his job meant other, better doors were going to open for us. And they did. The other is related to our timeshares. My husband lived out of them for 4 months and 1 week from the time he arrived in Florida to start the job until a week after we closed on our house. Financially that was a lifesaver! I convinced him to give the job a try by telling him that thanks to the timeshares we weren't shelling out any money for a place for him to stay if he took the job. We didn't have to put down any deposits or commit to a lease. If he didn't like the job he could quit and just stay and enjoy whatever days remained inside of the 15 day cancellation window. That him trying the job was costing us nothing but the gas money to get down there.

Bear with me because there is a little more to the story. At the time my husband lost his job we were platinum Wyndham owners which means we owned over a million points with them and we had another timeshare in RCI. The maintenance fees seemed like a crippling expense we surely didn't need at that time. I have always managed our money and paid the bills so my stress level was through the roof. After all that we'd spent to buy what we had the idea of losing it all was heartbreaking. So I gave up what little free time I had with working 50-60 hour work weeks and gave up some desperately needed sleep time too to learn how to rent and do all the work renting involves. I didn't even know point managers existed at that time or I would have gone that route. For the next several years that renting saved us from going the routes other people take.

I am happy to say that we made up for what would ;have been a larger amount of pension he lost because we made a commitment to save hard for those remaining years until my husband retired and instead of retiring at 65 he worked a few more years. And that probably put us farther ahead than we would have been if none of that had happened. Because my husband set his own work schedule and his territory was all of Florida south of Sarasota and Fort Pierce we were able to use our timeshares more even before he retired than many people do even after they retire. That made it very easy for him to keep working those few extra years. As as some of you know from my posts we are making even more use of our timeshares now. Home only 28 out of 155 nights from mid July to mid December.

We have far more reasons to be grateful for our timeshares than we have regrets for what we spent. Many of us have a story and that's ours!
Thank you for sharing your beautiful stories @Jan M. @Fredflintstone . As my parents were refugees, I also grew up poor. My mom would stitch my sock holes instead of buying new ones. I rarely got new clothes, but used ones at Goodwill or the Salvation Army. I often wore my older sister's hand-me-downs, so I got made fun of a lot. Christmas dinner was often porridge and beans.

I remember my parents' employers both dropped them to part-time work, and my parents missed two mortgage payments. They were worried about being foreclosed upon, sued for any deficiency payments, and how they were going to afford an attorney. As they were obviously uninformed, they didn't even know they didn't have to worry about deficiency lawsuits at the time, which would have saved them a lot of stress and anxiety. They were also worried about their credit scores and whether they'd be able to buy another car if their car breaks down. That's why I take great exception to the idea TS foreclosure information is helpful only to the well-off and not to the middle-class or lower middle-class TS owners. I've been there.

From those experiences, my sisters and I committed to work hard and never return to that situation. My older sis is a doctor. My sisters and I never quit our lower-middle-class spending habits, at the chagrin of our spouses. I guess it's our fear never to return to that situation, If my wife and I spent like normal middle-class people, our net worth would be $300k, instead of $400k. I am still amazed how many middle-class folks buy their kids $10 meals twice-daily, or $100 shoes every three (3) months or every "season." Or how many middle-class fathers buy $1000 new flat-screen tvs, $1000 new smart phones, or electronics every year. Or how many middle-class mothers buy $100 shoes and a $100 purse every month, "one for each outfit."

My sisters and I both give to our parents. My older sis gives $400/month, me $200/month, and my little sis $100/month to my parents. With their SS income, it's enough for them to retire comfortably. Their house is nearly paid off.

I see disinformation to be especially concerning in the lower middle-class communities. I had another disabled client who hadn't filed taxes for ten (10) years. I asked her why she never filed taxes, told that it's actually a federal crime, and that she actually could have gotten money back with Earned Income Child Credit. She said her accountant told her she didn't have to file since she was disabled. Turns out her accountant was a "hood accountant," and not a CPA. I wondered how many lower-income folks are not getting Earned Income Child Credits from advice from "hood accountants."

Eventually, she filed three (3) years of tax returns, paid any late penalties, and got about $5.8k total back in Earned Income Child Credits. She apologized to the IRS for not filing taxes and explained her disability kept her from physically traveling to brick-and-mortar tax-filing businesses or accessing online tax-filing websites. Honestly, I don't think the IRS minded too much, since they technically owed her money. Besides the refund check, we never heard back from the IRS. I was happy that she started telling her other disabled friends with children that they too could get Earned Income Child Credits.

The point is that I actually agree that mainly the well-informed, resourceful, and well-connected TS owners know about anti-deficiency. Exit companies, such as Wesley, use anti-deficiency to draw less-informed, less resourceful, and less-connected TS owners in. Exit companies profit off their knowledge of anti-deficiency. I didn't even know about anti-deficiency until the second year of law school.

I want less-informed, less resourceful, and less-connected TS owners to know about anti-deficiency, even those that can't afford the $15 TUG membership fee. If they did, maybe they'd use TS deedback programs more and pay $3k to those exit companies less often.
 
Last edited:

Fredflintstone

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Bravo @Grammarhero!

One really doesn’t understand until they are in that person’s shoes.

Although I respect the fact that resorts are in a profit driven business. I draw the line when the sales team use creative methods to get someone into a timeshare knowing full well they cannot afford it and are vulnerable. Then, this person is left with dire choices as a result. Just read the mountain of stories on BBB complaints, consumer affairs and the like and the picture becomes clearer.

A case in point is I assisted a person who has an income of 12 k per year with rent of 750 a month. They were gifted a free vacation from a non profit organization to Las Vegas. They had free airfare, 1 k spending and timeshare accommodation. It was a Christmas Gift.

Miraculously, they ended up with a 25 k timeshare with zero down and a loan set at a 26.99 percent interest rate for 10 years. This person has clear, proven cognitive challenges and doesn’t understand. They are their own Guardian. They are vulnerable to any sophisticated sales pitches due to their cognition and desire to feel accepted. In short, they aim to please at all costs.

Fast forward, this person was crying and distraught when the bills started pouring in. Of course, the recession allowance has expired. They can’t afford the payments or the MF. Frankly, the collection letters and calls they received were quite threatening. So, I got involved at no cost. I was shocked after explaining this person’s situation how the resort stuck with “a deal is a deal” and “he signed the contract.”

At the end, the resort ran with their tails between their legs, took back the timeshare and forgave the loan. I was prepared to deal with them in Court at my expense if they weren’t going to be reasonable. The relief this person had was priceless and, I think, lesson learned on their part too. That’s why I keep advocating for buyer/seller lawyers before transactions complete. It’s to avoid situations like this.

Providing basic legal information is empowering and as @Grammarhero stated, we are focussing in on the less informed and the vulnerable.





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Last edited:

dayooper

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The Land of Ice and Snow
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HGVC at The Flamingo
Bravo @Grammarhero!

One really doesn’t understand until they are in that person’s shoes.

Although I respect the fact that resorts are in a profit driven business. I draw the line when the sales team use creative methods to get someone into a timeshare knowing full well they cannot afford it and are vulnerable. Then, this person is left with dire choices as a result. Just read the mountain of stories on BBB complaints, consumer affairs and the like and the picture becomes clearer.

A case in point is I assisted a person who has an income of 12 k per year with rent of 750 a month. They were gifted a free vacation from a non profit organization to Las Vegas. They had free airfare, 1 k spending and timeshare accommodation. It was a Christmas Gift.

Miraculously, they ended up with a 25 k timeshare with zero down and a loan set at a 26.99 percent interest rate for 10 years. This person has clear, proven cognitive challenges and doesn’t understand. They are their own Guardian. They are vulnerable to any sophisticated sales pitches due to their cognition and desire to feel accepted. In short, they aim to please at all costs.

Fast forward, this person was crying and distraught when the bills started pouring in. Of course, the recession allowance has expired. They can’t afford the payments or the MF. Frankly, the collection letters and calls they received were quite threatening. So, I got involved at no cost. I was shocked after explaining this person’s situation how the resort stuck with “a deal is a deal” and “he signed the contract.”

At the end, the resort ran with their tails between their legs, took back the timeshare and forgave the loan. I was prepared to deal with them in Court at my expense if they weren’t going to be reasonable. The relief this person had was priceless and, I think, lesson learned on their part too. That’s why I keep advocating for buyer/seller lawyers before transactions complete. It’s to avoid situations like this.

Providing basic legal information is empowering and as @Grammarhero stated, we are focussing in on the less informed and the vulnerable.





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Great story!
 

klam2go

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Campbell River, BC
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former Grandview at Las Vegas owner
Just in the last stage of "selling" our Grandview timeshare (1 Bedroom RCI 49,000 annual points). Shoutout to LT Transfers for their excellent work. FYI so you know what we paid. Every thing is complete. Deed is filed, points are transferred, and the new owner has received their 2020 invoice. We're just waiting for the letter from the resort.

LT Transfers: $461.55 USD which included the $250 resort transfer fee, LT's fees and all filing fees, taxes, etc. Paid by us (seller)

Notary: $50 CDN. We live in Canada so we had to go to our notary and have our signatures witnessed on the deed + another $27 CDN to express post the deed back to LT and track the package internationally.

The new owner paid the 2020 maintenance fees ($417.50 USD) and the RCI transfer ($99 USD if already a member).

Daily Management wanted to charge us $2500 USD to deed back the timeshare. We'd already spent $495 USD to a reseller with zero results.

If you really want to "sell" (reality is give it away) make sure your membership and fees are up to date , offer to pay the transfer fees and you are out.

In the end what we paid to get out equals about one year's worth of maintenance fees and RCI fees.
 

farinc

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This discussion reminds me of the Seinfeld episode where Kramer decides the easiest way to get a refund on a stereo is to buy postal insurance on a package because the post office will "write it off". :doh:

I suspect the Wyndham/Mad Money example refers to bad debt on loans with timeshare sales instead of unpaid MF.

But ignoring the fact that unpaid MF's most likely are paid by other owners rather than the company, just because a company has set up an allowance for something doesn't make it ethical to specifically take an action that will result in that allowance being used. Consider that most retailers also have an allowance for theft or "shrinkage" - would stealing then be okay because an accounting entry has been made somewhere? :shrug:

When there is a reasonable alternative to get rid of an unwanted asset I'm an advocate of taking the action which will fulfill contractual obligations. In this case the resort is relatively easy to get rid of via a viable transfer to a lucky new timeshare owner who will hopefully appreciate it (and also helps them avoid the snare of timeshare salespeople) or by a deedback for relatively low $$$.


Thanks for the vid. Hilarious episode.
 

farinc

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Just in the last stage of "selling" our Grandview timeshare (1 Bedroom RCI 49,000 annual points). Shoutout to LT Transfers for their excellent work. FYI so you know what we paid. Every thing is complete. Deed is filed, points are transferred, and the new owner has received their 2020 invoice. We're just waiting for the letter from the resort.

LT Transfers: $461.55 USD which included the $250 resort transfer fee, LT's fees and all filing fees, taxes, etc. Paid by us (seller)

Notary: $50 CDN. We live in Canada so we had to go to our notary and have our signatures witnessed on the deed + another $27 CDN to express post the deed back to LT and track the package internationally.

The new owner paid the 2020 maintenance fees ($417.50 USD) and the RCI transfer ($99 USD if already a member).

Daily Management wanted to charge us $2500 USD to deed back the timeshare. We'd already spent $495 USD to a reseller with zero results.

If you really want to "sell" (reality is give it away) make sure your membership and fees are up to date , offer to pay the transfer fees and you are out.

In the end what we paid to get out equals about one year's worth of maintenance fees and RCI fees.
What information does the buyer provide during the process other than of course their name and address?
 

Grammarhero

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Ethical issues ? Would it come close to the unethical way this thing was sold to us ? I don't think so. I'm only worried if this has international legal implications. I don't think so, but maybe someone here actually *knows*.
@DutchTraveler Good afternoon, to help other tuggers in similar situations, would you kindly let me know if you decided to stop paying and, if so, whether yourcredit got affected? You may DM or PM me.
 
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We are still considering the options. I really feel like not putting in another dime and just letting it ride. Having to pay to get rid of it seems so counter intuitive ... The only reason we're still thinking about it, is we don't want to restrict our choices in the future .. Suppose we want to move to the USA for some reason. This could haunt us. It's also difficult to just forget about the whole thing since it was such a huge expense at the time. Doing a transfer would at least close the chapter for good.
 

CalGalTraveler

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It's hard to close a chapter and admit you lost money. However, the money is gone and nothing you can do at this point will bring it back.

$250 to deedback sounds like a small amount of money to sleep at night.
 

Grammarhero

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We are still considering the options. I really feel like not putting in another dime and just letting it ride. Having to pay to get rid of it seems so counter intuitive ... The only reason we're still thinking about it, is we don't want to restrict our choices in the future .. Suppose we want to move to the USA for some reason. This could haunt us. It's also difficult to just forget about the whole thing since it was such a huge expense at the time. Doing a transfer would at least close the chapter for good.
Good morning @DutchTraveler , if you defaulted on your TS, would you kindly PM me as to whether your credit got affected? It would help tuggers in similar situations moving forward.
 
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