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Do you know how much you are getting skimmed?

DanCali

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I feel that the best way for Marriott to have done it was to give all platinum weeks at a resort the same number of points rather than the average. If ALL platinum owners had the option based on availability to reserve ALL platinum weeks, why should any week(s) now be out of reach using points?

If your week at your resort is a platinum week, and all platinum owners can reserve weeks 21 to 36, then give all owners enough points to book any week 21 to 36, not just enough points to reserve week 21 or 36 (or as in many cases not enough points to book any platinum week). If Marriott deems those weeks at your resort are worth 3000 points, then give ALL platinum owners at that resort 3000 points. You now can trade for any 3000 point week at any resort, and you also can bank points and reserve 2 platinum weeks in your home resort the following year (one with points, one with home week). That would be fair and a points program I would join. I will not join the current program where they aren't even giving me enough points to reserve ANY week in my season. :mad:
The certainly would have been the best outcome but would have prevented the "reseasoning" that they did (I'm not saying the reseasoning was necessary, but just making a point).

If they did do the reseasoning, where they give weeks in the same season different points requirements to exchange into, and then give owners enough points to book any week in the season (i.e., points equal to the most valuable week rather than the average) it would have created a situation where all the owners combined have more points than are available in the system, which is probably an illegal outcome. Giving the owners the average at least would have prevented that outcome. Giving owners less than the average is skimming - which ironically must be legal :ponder:

What you suggest would have been possible if they did what many, if not all, other developers do with points systems - i.e., require the same number of points to book any week in a season. Then give owners that same number...

You raise an interesting point that was also raised by pipet... many tuggers would be unhappy with even getting the average points required to exchange into their season (which is probably the best we can do given the reseasoning). We are used to calling at exactly 13 or 12 months out, we are persistent, and on average probably manage to book better weeks than the average owners. Many probably wouldn't enroll even if Marriott did give us the average because we'd complain there was "skim" relative to the highest valued week...

However, I think that if Marriott gave owners the average required to trade into their season, they would probably have less of a PR problem on their hand. The discussion would switch to whether or not the reseasoning was fair. While there are arguments for and against, the reseasoning is probably at least more understandable than the skimming, which even now we don't know where all those points go (6%-13% of all the points of people who redeem for points in a given year is a lot of money to follow around).

FWIW, I think that if I got the average of the season I would have probably enrolled as an NCV owner... when you combine getting the average "trading power" of your season for points trades, with the ability to still book any week at your home resort as a week, and do II trades for uptrades it's not such a bad combo. Then getting the average of your season is the cost you pay for the convenience of instant confirmation, but at least you don't feel that Marriott dips its hands in your pockets each time you use points.
 

siberiavol

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That is a very good point.

Yes it could happen. And I am not aware that anyone has asked this.

As a side note - I think one needs to think about it slightly differently. Basically once you redeem for points in a given year you are like a points owner. You have no home resort and the best thing to do is to stop thinking like a weeks owner at that point... You just try to use the points you got (post skim) in whatever manner works best for you. If you make a reservation at (what was) your home resort or elsewhere that's neither here nor there. Once you have the points, you are not restricted to a particular resort or season (you can, in fact, book a different season at your "home" resort). You are only limited by availability and the number of points you have.

If you'll take a look at the spreadsheet for NCV you will see that some Platinum weeks are 2900 points to book and some are 4700. The fact that I got 3475 versus ~3700 (the average of the season) means there was skim. With the 3475 points I can still book the 2900 points Platinum weeks and come out ahead but the fact that NCV is my home resort doesn't really matter at this point, nor does it negate the skimming. Note that had I gotten the full 3700 points I'd have more points left over when booking a 2900 point week and would still be unable to book the 4700 points weeks. On the other hand, I can book in the Gold season too and I can book at any other resort with using the 3475 points I got. The issue is that Marriott should have given me 3700 points, because that's the number that represents the average "trade power" of my season.

And this skim issue seems to affect 100% of weeks owners.
Thanks for your hard work and useful information. I think your" side note" high lights a concept that would be useful to many on this board. When you shift asset classes focus on what you have not what you use to have. Points are a different asset class in a sense.

For an enrolled member the decision is whether to go to points for each property. If you decide to give up your week for points wouldn't it be the most productive use of time to see how to use the currency you have now.

In another year you get another chance to decide what to do. People shift from stocks to bonds to property etc all the time. How many times do we get a chance to start fresh each year with a maximun loss of $199 plus the one time fee to enroll.
 

GregT

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Well said, but if Marriott didn't do this, then no weeks owner would have the need to buy any points and there wouldn't be any revenue generated. It's all about making money, disguised behind the idea that flexibility is the better way.
This is exactly right -- without the skimming, owners would be able to do like-for-like and the need to purchase 1,000 points packages would be much reduced.

However, skimming often leaves the points converter 300-500 points short of what they really need to use the system, requiring that they consider a purchase of points for $9,200 (1,000 points at $9.20).

I have no problem at all with a for-profit company ensuring its financial success and viability -- but this is very disappointing that Marriott adopted this approach to disguise the true cost of the system . I personally would have much preferred a higher enrollment fee and paying fees for transactions outside of my home resort (reservation fee, housekeeping fee, etc similar to HGVC).

All the best,

Greg
 

BocaBum99

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Thanks for your hard work and useful information. I think your" side note" high lights a concept that would be useful to many on this board. When you shift asset classes focus on what you have not what you use to have. Points are a different asset class in a sense.

For an enrolled member the decision is whether to go to points for each property. If you decide to give up your week for points wouldn't it be the most productive use of time to see how to use the currency you have now.

In another year you get another chance to decide what to do. People shift from stocks to bonds to property etc all the time. How many times do we get a chance to start fresh each year with a maximun loss of $199 plus the one time fee to enroll.
I agree that you need to check the cost to go to each property. I view the skim as a currency exchange fee. When you go to Europe and exchange dollars to Euros, you pay a fee to do so. There is a buy rate and a sell rate for Euros, the difference is what the exchange company takes as profit. Same is true for Marriott.

To provide the best analysis, convert the points you get into a $MF/point (e.g. If you get 3000 points and your maintenance fees are $1000, then your $MF/point is $.30), then check some scenarios you are considering by multiplying that $MF/point by the number of points required for that trade. If the cost alarms you, don't do it. If it seems reasonable, then go for it.
 

BocaBum99

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This is exactly right -- without the skimming, owners would be able to do like-for-like and the need to purchase 1,000 points packages would be much reduced.

However, skimming often leaves the points converter 300-500 points short of what they really need to use the system, requiring that they consider a purchase of points for $9,200 (1,000 points at $9.20).

I have no problem at all with a for-profit company ensuring its financial success and viability -- but this is very disappointing that Marriott adopted this approach to disguise the true cost of the system . I personally would have much preferred a higher enrollment fee and paying fees for transactions outside of my home resort (reservation fee, housekeeping fee, etc similar to HGVC).

All the best,

Greg
You will probably be able to rent points from other owners or even from Marriott rather than purchasing points for $9200 per thousand.
 

GregT

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You will probably be able to rent points from other owners or even from Marriott rather than purchasing points for $9200 per thousand.
Agreed -- I feel sorry for the points converter who doesn't realize they can transfer (ie rent) points from others to make up for the points shortfall and writes the check for $9,200 and then $400 annually in MFs.
 

Lawlar

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Thank You

Thank you for explaining the point skimming concept. That was really helpful to me.

You folks are great!!!

Now I think I'll hang on to my fixed week deed and skip this skimming nonsense.
 

DanCali

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I view the skim as a currency exchange fee. When you go to Europe and exchange dollars to Euros, you pay a fee to do so. There is a buy rate and a sell rate for Euros, the difference is what the exchange company takes as profit. Same is true for Marriott.
You can view it that way but the difference between the Marriott skim factor and a currency exchange fee is that currency exchange fees existed forever and they are acceptable. They are also there to protect dealers from currency fluctuations (as well as profit).

Marriott's skim is unlike any other points system. It is unprecedented. To me, the better analogy is like a casino charging you a fee to convert your chips to dollars when you go to the cashier to cash out. If Caesar's Palace started that policy next week on the Vegas strip, how long do you think they would stay in business?


To provide the best analysis, convert the points you get into a $MF/point (e.g. If you get 3000 points and your maintenance fees are $1000, then your $MF/point is $.30), then check some scenarios you are considering by multiplying that $MF/point by the number of points required for that trade. If the cost alarms you, don't do it. If it seems reasonable, then go for it.
You can only go for it if you have the points :)
 
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BocaBum99

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You can view it that way but the difference between the Marriott skim factor and a currency exchange fee is that currency exchange fees existed forever and they are acceptable. They are also there to protect dealers from currency fluctuations (as well as profit).

Marriott's skim is unlike any other points system. It is unprecedented. To me, the better analogy is like a casino charging you a fee to convert your chips to dollars when you go to cashier to cash out. If Caesar's Palace started that policy next week on the Vegas strip, how long do you think they would stay in business?




You can only go for it if you have the points :)
I totally agree that Marriott is doing something unprecedented with skim. I think it's a very bad idea and I hope they repeal it.
 

BocaBum99

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Agreed -- I feel sorry for the points converter who doesn't realize they can transfer (ie rent) points from others to make up for the points shortfall and writes the check for $9,200 and then $400 annually in MFs.
The sad state of timesharing is that those with the knowledge (top 2-3% most of whom are frequent visitors to TUG) do extremely well and the rest struggle or are getting skimmed in many ways that they don't even know about.

In a odd way, those uninformed owners can be helped by the points system despite the skim. For instance, if a MOC owner has been depositing for equal trades to Orlando, at least in the point system, they can get more than they used to get by using II.
 

tombo

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If they did do the reseasoning, where they give weeks in the same season different points requirements to exchange into, and then give owners enough points to book any week in the season (i.e., points equal to the most valuable week rather than the average) it would have created a situation where all the owners combined have more points than are available in the system, which is probably an illegal outcome. Giving the owners the average at least would have prevented that outcome. Giving owners less than the average is skimming - which ironically must be legal :ponder:

What you suggest would have been possible if they did what many, if not all, other developers do with points systems - i.e., require the same number of points to book any week in a season. Then give owners that same number...

You raise an interesting point that was also raised by pipet... many tuggers would be unhappy with even getting the average points required to exchange into their season (which is probably the best we can do given the reseasoning). We are used to calling at exactly 13 or 12 months out, we are persistent, and on average probably manage to book better weeks than the average owners. Many probably wouldn't enroll even if Marriott did give us the average because we'd complain there was "skim" relative to the highest valued week...

However, I think that if Marriott gave owners the average required to trade into their season, they would probably have less of a PR problem on their hand. The discussion would switch to whether or not the reseasoning was fair. While there are arguments for and against, the reseasoning is probably at least more understandable than the skimming, which even now we don't know where all those points go (6%-13% of all the points of people who redeem for points in a given year is a lot of money to follow around).
Marriott would still put the best in season weeks out of reach if they gave owners the average.

If the prime platinum weeks require 3000 points, the least demand platinum weeks receive 2500 points, and all platinum owner's receive the average which is 2750 points, then not a single owner has enough points to reserve a preferred 3000 point platinum week at their reosrt or any resort Marriott asigns the identical point value to. So if resort A and Resort B all have prime weeks requiring 3000 points but all platinum owners at both resorts only receive the average which is 2750 points, then NONE of the owners at resort A have enough points to reserve an identically rated prime week at resort B, and no one at resort B can reserve at resort A, and neither can bank points to reserve a prime week at their own resort the following year. Now you are locked out of all prime weeks at like rated resorts and even at your home resort unless you buy or borrow points. Who ndo you think will end up with the prime weeks that no owners at like resorts can afford to reserve? Could the answer be Marriott?

If they had instead said all platinum weeks at resort A and resort B are worth 3000 points, owners at resort A could (based on availability) reserve a prime platinum week at resort B, and vice versa. Marriott would not be locked out from selling points just because they made the points assignments equitable for all owners. Simple sales pitch. You own 3000 points every year at resort A which will get you like resorts each year like resort B, but the best resorts like resort c in Hawaii require at least 5000 points. If you combine your 3000 points for 2 years you can reserve a 5000 point week with 1000 points left over, but those points won be enough to get a vacation. If you BUY an additional 1000 points you now have 4000 points each year. You use 3000 points to vacation at a like resort this year and you carry over 1000 points to next year giving you 5000 points to reserve a nicer resort/location like resort C in Hawaii. By adding points you can go on a vacation in your home resort or one like it each year and every other year take a much nicert trip.

If they had wanted to, Marriott could have treated owners fairly while still creating a need for owners to buy more points. Almost all owners but those who own many weeks, or those receiving lots of points from owning a week with the best locations/seasons, will need additional points to continue to vacation at the resorts/weeks they are used to if they use points. The market was there to sell more points to current owners even if Marriott hadn't gotten so greedy and implemented the point stealing skim.
 
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windje2000

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You can view it that way but the difference between the Marriott skim factor and a currency exchange fee is that currency exchange fees existed forever and they are acceptable. They are also there to protect dealers from currency fluctuations (as well as profit).

Marriott's skim is unlike any other points system. It is unprecedented. To me, the better analogy is like a casino charging you a fee to convert your chips to dollars when you go to cashier to cash out. If Caesar's Palace started that policy next week on the Vegas strip, how long do you think they would stay in business?




You can only go for it if you have the points :)
Well put. Also, thanks for the spreadsheets you put together.
 

pipet

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The sad state of timesharing is that those with the knowledge (top 2-3% most of whom are frequent visitors to TUG) do extremely well and the rest struggle or are getting skimmed in many ways that they don't even know about.

In a odd way, those uninformed owners can be helped by the points system despite the skim. For instance, if a MOC owner has been depositing for equal trades to Orlando, at least in the point system, they can get more than they used to get by using II.
This is very true. I was one of those people who didn't know how to use the system well. My solution was not to exchange often (and then only back to Hawaii) because I didn't want to eat the loss. On the surface, the points is very exciting because I do get more value for my week than if I only do a single downtrade exchange with II (no AC, XYZ fun stuff), and I think that's why some of the owners even here on TUG are happy with it; they won't have to work the II system at all. Also, with II, you don't necessarily have to have HI (or some other expensive week) to get those super deals, and I think that causes some resentment. The disparity will continue in II if inventory allows (but that's the big question, now).

I think some will write off the ability to do lateral exchanges for the ability to downtrade with the knowledge they are getting more than the little guy who converts (who probably won't convert!), not thinking about how costly such a transaction is to themselves. I can't be happy with a system that penalizes me, too!

You can obviously see I am still stuck on not being able to do the island-to-island exchanges with points!:annoyed: Yes, I should just move on (I'll shutup about it now), but everytime I look at the point redemption chart I'm POd because I do feel like I should be able to get into HI (again, big selling point of HI). Hopefully with II, I still will for a long, long time.
 

windje2000

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Dan - best analytical post on skim on the board. But it reflects a static analysis - a snapshot in time.

Points currently are at a $9.20 intro price, and some say they will go to $10. That's one way of raising prices.

But there's another way.

Consider this -- The land trust owns deeds and sells points.

Marriott controls not only the cash price of points, but also the exchange ratio of points to deeds. The exchange ratio is 'subject to change.'

Suppose they raise all prices 10% - the price of occupancy goes up 10% and the points assigned to your deed goes up 10%. I believe DClub rules allow them to do that.

1. A villa assigned 4000 points/week rents for 5000 points/week. - 1000 point skim which is 25%.

2. Prices increase 10% - New prices - that villa is now assigned 4400 points rents for 5500 points.

3. The skim (in percent) stays the same. The skim (in points or units) increases.

The skim is still 25% [1000/4000 = 1100/4400] but the unit skim goes from 1000 to 1100.

4. The trust just created 400 new points to sell if they own the villa in the example.

5. They diluted (skimmed) the interests of the points owners and created demand for more points.

6. If you've got points banked, they just got devalued also.
 

DanCali

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Dan - best analytical post on skim on the board. But it reflects a static analysis - a snapshot in time.

Points currently are at a $9.20 intro price, and some say they will go to $10. That's one way of raising prices.

But there's another way.

Consider this -- The land trust owns deeds and sells points.

Marriott controls not only the cash price of points, but also the exchange ratio of points to deeds. The exchange ratio is 'subject to change.'

Suppose they raise all prices 10% - the price of occupancy goes up 10% and the points assigned to your deed goes up 10%. I believe DClub rules allow them to do that.

1. A villa assigned 4000 points/week rents for 5000 points/week. - 1000 point skim which is 25%.

2. Prices increase 10% - New prices - that villa is now assigned 4400 points rents for 5500 points.

3. The skim (in percent) stays the same. The skim (in points or units) increases.

The skim is still 25% [1000/4000 = 1100/4400] but the unit skim goes from 1000 to 1100.

4. The trust just created 400 new points to sell if they own the villa in the example.

5. They diluted (skimmed) the interests of the points owners and created demand for more points.

6. If you've got points banked, they just got devalued also.
My understanding until now is that they cannot just raise all prices by 10%. I thought the number of points at each resort was fixed so if they raise the price (points) for 1 week, they need to lower the price for a different week. I didn't dig into those documents, but that was my impression based on reading other posts somewhere along the way.

What you are saying is something else - and if it is true it could open a whole new can of worms... but I am not sure it'd be allowed for Marriott to do that.

As for the static analysis - that's the best I can do given the data :) But at least all the data is there so it's relatively objective and valid given the 2011 calendar we got from Marriott itself...
 

GeNioS

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Marriott's skim is unlike any other points system. It is unprecedented.
THanks for all your work on this....i think you're right. Last year I bought a very small interest in the Wyndham points system. I bought 84,000 points, which represents a 1br during prime season at the resort. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't thing there is any way that Wyndham can ever change the amount of points it takes to reserve a 1br in prime season. After all, my points are tied to a deed of a 1br week at the resort.

I can understand how newer resorts may have increased point values...after all, they do cost more to build, inflation, yadda yadda yadda...but it wouldn't make any sense that with me paying maitenance fees to keep up my own resort, there should be no way that my points shouldn't be able to get me into what I purchased year after year....correct?

But now Marriott is telling me that if I join up into their points system that my week isn't worth enough points to rent itself....how does that work? And it seems (I can't quote anyone in particular) that I get the feeling that people are actually talking about the possibility of Marriott raising the points required to reserve units in the future...much like the devaluation of the rewards points. There is NO WAY that can happen, right? I mean, if you're a new owner and you've never known anything other than points and you buy points with the idea it will get you a specific unit year after year...there is NO WAY that one day Marriott is going to tell that guy,"Oops, sorry...this year your points aren't enough to get in anymore...you have to buy more." Right?

The more I learn the more confused I get.
 

GregT

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My understanding until now is that they cannot just raise all prices by 10%. I thought the number of points at each resort was fixed so if they raise the price (points) for 1 week, they need to lower the price for a different week. I didn't dig into those documents, but that was my impression based on reading other posts somewhere along the way..
I posed this specific question when I spoke to the Director of Customer Advocacy. It is my understanding that the points that we are given for our weeks will not change (up or down) once established, however it is very possible that the Marriott Points Chart will change.

Specific weeks may go up/down depending on actual demand and supply, however the total points required will remain the same. If a specific week goes down, then something else went up to compensate.

By the way, I'm trying to be more on point here -- I started one of my skim rants but then decided it was just repeat of my other skim rants, so I deleted it. That's progress towards remaining factual, isn't it??? :)

Best to all,

Greg
 

brigechols

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THanks for all your work on this....i think you're right. Last year I bought a very small interest in the Wyndham points system. I bought 84,000 points, which represents a 1br during prime season at the resort. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't thing there is any way that Wyndham can ever change the amount of points it takes to reserve a 1br in prime season. After all, my points are tied to a deed of a 1br week at the resort.

I can understand how newer resorts may have increased point values...after all, they do cost more to build, inflation, yadda yadda yadda...but it wouldn't make any sense that with me paying maitenance fees to keep up my own resort, there should be no way that my points shouldn't be able to get me into what I purchased year after year....correct?

But now Marriott is telling me that if I join up into their points system that my week isn't worth enough points to rent itself....how does that work? And it seems (I can't quote anyone in particular) that I get the feeling that people are actually talking about the possibility of Marriott raising the points required to reserve units in the future...much like the devaluation of the rewards points. There is NO WAY that can happen, right? I mean, if you're a new owner and you've never known anything other than points and you buy points with the idea it will get you a specific unit year after year...there is NO WAY that one day Marriott is going to tell that guy,"Oops, sorry...this year your points aren't enough to get in anymore...you have to buy more." Right?

The more I learn the more confused I get.
Your week can get you into the home resort for a week during your season; however, there is no guarantee that points will get you into the home resort for a week during your season or at any other time. Marriott may increase/decrease the number of vacation club points required to reserve an interval. Also, Marriott may increase/decrease the number of points assessed for your unit if you deposit for vacation club points. For example, today I will receive 4025 vacation club points if I enroll the Ko Olina unit. Next year, Marriott may review the supply/demand for Ko Olina and decide to decrease that number of increase that number. Just log into your MVCI account and check the value of your week. This disclaimer appears "The points value of my enrolled week(s) and the points required to occupy any particular resort are subject to change."
 
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DanCali

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Vistana: WKV, HRA (5*)
Marriott: NCV (Pres)
THanks for all your work on this....i think you're right. Last year I bought a very small interest in the Wyndham points system. I bought 84,000 points, which represents a 1br during prime season at the resort. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't thing there is any way that Wyndham can ever change the amount of points it takes to reserve a 1br in prime season. After all, my points are tied to a deed of a 1br week at the resort.

I can understand how newer resorts may have increased point values...after all, they do cost more to build, inflation, yadda yadda yadda...but it wouldn't make any sense that with me paying maitenance fees to keep up my own resort, there should be no way that my points shouldn't be able to get me into what I purchased year after year....correct?

But now Marriott is telling me that if I join up into their points system that my week isn't worth enough points to rent itself....how does that work? And it seems (I can't quote anyone in particular) that I get the feeling that people are actually talking about the possibility of Marriott raising the points required to reserve units in the future...much like the devaluation of the rewards points. There is NO WAY that can happen, right? I mean, if you're a new owner and you've never known anything other than points and you buy points with the idea it will get you a specific unit year after year...there is NO WAY that one day Marriott is going to tell that guy,"Oops, sorry...this year your points aren't enough to get in anymore...you have to buy more." Right?

The more I learn the more confused I get.
I am not that familiar with Wyndham but as far as I know all points systems have the equation that "points in = points out" or, in other words, the total points available for owners to use equal the total points in the entire system. This equation should also hold resort by resort. It does not hold in the Marriott system.

To accomplish that equation you can (i) give all weeks in a season the same point value (tombo's suggestion) both for exchanging in and in terms of points given to owners, (ii) give different weeks different points values (what Marriott did when in switched from weeks to points) and give owners the average required to trade into their season (not what Marriott did). As others pointed out, in option (ii) even if you get the average of the season you will have weeks in your season you cannot reserve with points but at least the points you get represent more accurately the "trading power" of your season. If you got the average points of your season and could still book any week in your season as a week, that's probably something many owners would be somewhat more comfortable with.

As to what can or may happen... your guess is as good as mine. I have yet to see a recorded document with the full rules of this program and what the developer can or cannot do. They gave us reservation rules. But I want to see what happens with the skim, what Marriott can do with those points, when Marriott is allowed to make reservations for itself or for the trust etc... You'd think that has to be disclosed to owners somewhere. :ponder:
 
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m61376

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I'm unclear on that from documents, but my best guess that the point level you enroll your week at will never drop. So, if you get 7475, that's what you'll always get and your MF's will run with your underlying resort as they do currently.
From what I've been told is that Marriott may make adjustments to both the point allotments and the point cost as their actuarial calculations deem appropriate. Since the total points for the units in the trust remains stable, if one oges up the other goes down. I was told that the points allocated may be adjusted similarly.

Again, this is just what I was told, but it does point out that the points allocated may even go down. For example- Caribbean weeks received on the whole much lower allocations even in Plat. season. IF the demand increases there because of that and more people decide to go there than Hawaii, there could be a point adjustment up for the Caribbean and down for Hawaii. I am not saying that will happen- but if it did, Marirott can make those adjustments- so nothing is guaranteed.
 

camachinist

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Here's some support for your perspective, from the exchange procedures manual, 094873:0154_1478499.10 3/12/2010 4:27 PM:

2. Exchange Members. Each calendar year, an Exchange Member may Deposit Use Periods associated with the Exchange Member’s Interest with the Exchange Company during the applicable Deposit Window. Exchange Members are required to Deposit Use Periods in 7-consecutive evening increments (in accordance with the usage calendar associated with the Exchange Member’s Component). Lock-off portions of an Accommodation are not eligible to be deposited. Deposits may only be made during the Deposit Window for the Use Period that the Exchange Member desires to Deposit. With respect to Exchange Members who own alternate year Interests, such Exchange Members will be entitled to Deposit Use Periods associated with their Interests during the calendar year in which such Exchange Member’s use rights occur, and will be required to use their Exchange Points during the same year; provided, however, such Exchange Member will be assessed Exchange Company Dues on an annual basis.
For administrative convenience in the operation of the Program and for determination of the respective rights of Exchange Members to enjoy the benefits of the Program, the Exchange Company will assign a Distribution of Exchange Points to each Exchange Member for Use Periods Deposited by the Exchange Member for exchange each Use Year. The number of Exchange Points in a Distribution for a particular Use Period is based on various factors such as relative daily and seasonal demand, Accommodation capacity, size, view, and furnishings, and other valuation parameters established by the Exchange Company and may very from year to year by such factors. The number of Exchange Points in a Distribution is not in any way intended to be reflective of the economic value of any Interest.
 

BocaBum99

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Here's some support for your perspective, from the exchange procedures manual, 094873:0154_1478499.10 3/12/2010 4:27 PM:
It will be interesting to see how often Marriott changes the skim factor. If they make it worse, it will really add salt to the wound to owners. They certainly won't be congratulated for doing such a thing.

I think it's more likely that they decide they made a mistake and get rid of skim. I am wondering what owners on this message board would do if they did?
 

RedDogSD

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It will be interesting to see how often Marriott changes the skim factor. If they make it worse, it will really add salt to the wound to owners. They certainly won't be congratulated for doing such a thing.

I think it's more likely that they decide they made a mistake and get rid of skim. I am wondering what owners on this message board would do if they did?
Depends on how they got rid of it. Would they give owners enough points to get anything in their season, or just the average? Most NCV owners would not be happy if they could still not get enough points for July, August and most desert owners would not be happy if we could not get enough points for March-April.

To duplicate the way that Disney, Hilton, etc have done it, they would have to reduce the number of different point reservation categories. They usually only sold 3 (sometimes 4) seasons, but now they have 6-8 different point totals for the year.
 
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