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What are some of your favorite dishes to prepare at the timeshare resort when you do not want to eat at a restaurant?

bobby

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We don't "cook". Just heat up grocery store things. Often dinner is everyone goes to a good grocery and picks up what they want for dinner at the premade counters. A great way to have things you like but others don't (fried chicken, okra, etc.). Bring right home and eat. A large purchased chocolate cake starts off the week. Costco isn't around where we timeshare.
 

klpca

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Why would you not have access to your dried herbs? They don't take up much space in luggage.
I have two full kitchen drawers of herbs plus my two raised beds outside. You never know which ones you might need. :D I suppose that I could take the "most likely" suspects, but truthfully we usually take two carryon sized suitcases so space is also an issue. For my roast chicken I use rosemary, sage, thyme, garlic, and parsley. Plus I would need my salt and pepper grinders. It's just easier to buy things preseasoned.
 

GetawaysRus

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Anyone else tried these yet? I found them in-store at our local Costco, in the closed refrigerator cases (the ones with doors) that have meats such as hot dogs. About $13-14 or so if I remember, and good for 2 meals for both of us. We've been wrapping the entire rack in aluminum foil to reduce the mess (after making sure to get all the BBQ sauce out of the package and onto the ribs), then putting them on our grill (set a little above Medium) for about 30 minutes. They're quite good, and I suspect would be a fun timeshare meal if you like ribs and want something easy to prepare.

Costco Baby Back Pork Ribs.JPG
 
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Icc5

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It all depends on what we are doing,weather,etc. We usually eat out at least once a day when on vacation. If we decide to sleep in or not leave the unit till later we make sure to have English muffins,bacon,eggs. My wife will make eggs and either sausage or bacon on the muffin. We also try to get fresh bagels if in an area that has a bakery or coffee shop. We also have bacon,lettuce,tomato at least one of the days. We try staying simple which we also do at home. We do eat out on vacation several times even though neither one of us are big restaurant people. If we have a BBQ nearby we will grill some steaks and burgers along with some good sausage.
When on vacation we usually drive a lot to see the sights even if it means long drives.
We also try finding a grocery store that has the pre cut up fruit. We eat more fruit then we ever used to and fruit works great for a light breakfast or lunch. We also always have milk and cereal as a quack meal. Tacos and burritos always for simple again. When we want something more refined we hit a restaurant.
Bart
 

easyrider

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For our Mexico trips we usually arrive after 5 pm and have been up since 3 am to catch our first flight at 5 am. We usually bring a frozen package of Garlic Chicken casserole and have that on our first night. Sometimes pizza and beers at the beach depending on who is traveling with us.

For Hawaii trips it is the same travel times but we end up with a couple of extra hours because of the time zone difference. We like to go to the ABC store, get a couple plates of finger foods and some beverages and head to the beach for sunset.

Driving destinations for us include bbq's on site so we bbq something.

Bill
 

exco

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Thank you for your suggestions and ideas.
Here are some of my favorite recipes to cook at a timeshare resort:

Microwave steamed eggs

Shredded Chicken

Fruit and yogurt smoothie

I would appreciate more recipes from you.
 

crowmg

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We are gone during the day so we have dinner when we get back from our shopping, travels or sightseeing. Mostly premade foods like grilled chicken, bagged salads and fresh vegetables/fruits from the grocery store.
 

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I have two full kitchen drawers of herbs plus my two raised beds outside. You never know which ones you might need. :D I suppose that I could take the "most likely" suspects, but truthfully we usually take two carryon sized suitcases so space is also an issue. For my roast chicken I use rosemary, sage, thyme, garlic, and parsley. Plus I would need my salt and pepper grinders. It's just easier to buy things preseasoned.
That's understandable. I always know which four meals I will prepare and that helps in deciding what to bring and what to leave at home for things such as spices/herbs. Then I just have to buy the fresh ingredients at the destination.
 

amycurl

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Our joke is if we're not at the grocery store every day, we're not really on vacation. ;)

When we got married, we registered for and received a "campground kitchen," which now lives in our timeshare box. It's like a hanging toiletries kit, but with space for spices, oils, etc. So that goes with us on every drive-to timeshare trip.

We then bring things that work to create quick lunches or to extend leftovers...this includes things like pasta and sauce, box macaroni and cheese, a can or two of soup, a can of tuna and/or chicken, our homemade and canned applesauce and tomatoes, and usually a cheap package of ramen. And then usually small Tupperware containers of staples like flour and sugar. (Lemme tell you about the time that TSA in Kona was confused when my mother packed a small electronic device--inside a secure plastic case--within the small flour container, still with some flour in it....) Some trips we find we eat out lunches mostly, and some places it's mostly dinners. (Depends on the day/location/season.) We probably only eat out maybe 4 or 5 times total. One of the things I love to do is find local farmer's markets and be inspired by local ingredients and go from there. My mother, my daughter, and I all enjoy cooking and baking, and exploring other places' foodways (both local markets and grocery stores) is part of the fun we get out of timeshare vacations.

Soup--of some kind--usually gets made at least once per vacation. (Leftovers + quart of homemade tomatoes and/or can of cream of something soup = tasty lunches for days.) Easy grilled something usually once (esp. if it's nice weather.) Lemon sponge is a favorite dessert.

Have any of you ever participated in the "Iron Chef" type activity that some Marriott resorts run? Our family loves those, and we almost always win. ;)
 

cafeirene

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For locations we can drive to and have visited before (thus are well aware of any kitchen limitations), we try to sous vide then freeze at least one steak-like item in advance to sear for dinner one night, pre-make and freeze for transit either a bolognese or maybe a batch of gumbo. Pack starches to cook there (rice, pasta, potatoes). For Carmel, we can always stop and pick up fresh artichokes or other veg on the way, for Tahoe locations we try to stop in at a fruit stand near Auburn on the way up to fill in any fresh items. Also, for Northstar, we pick up at least one ready to heat dinner from Truckee Food Shop, a chef-owned local food provider who makes a variety of entrees and select ala carte items for lunch or dinners. The roasted chicken dinner is the best!! In Sedona, since that is a road trip destination, we know what the local shopping is, plan accordingly and also seek out tamales from Tamaliza for more than one meal. Definitely the best restaurant in Sedona.

We pack those items we know we want - a few select spices, tools, wine and sparkling water. butter, olive oil, etc. Tools include a microplane, a juice squeezer, maybe a knife, and an aeropress for coffee.

When we fly (say for Hawaii), we normally have regular shopping locally, taking full advantage of fresh fish and fruit, veg. Of course we haven't been able to visit Hawaii since Covid-19, and hope some of our favourite food sources somehow survive. We generally cook most mornings and evenings, and if out at lunch, would plan that be the main-meal-of-the-day. Depending on length of stay, very few Costco items (hard to justify a 1L bottle of rum for 10 days but if we are staying 2+ weeks or have extra people, it might be worth it, but generally on Maui we support Tamura's who also have excellent poke to go. I buy fresh fish 4-5 times a week when on island and try to simplify and go native in my cooking.
 

klpca

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That's understandable. I always know which four meals I will prepare and that helps in deciding what to bring and what to leave at home for things such as spices/herbs. Then I just have to buy the fresh ingredients at the destination.
Fresh herbs are the ultimate luxury to me. We get a CSA box every week with produce (only $25 - what a deal!) so I told my husband to just plant more herbs for me and skip the veggies. Funny herb story - somehow the mint died. Mint is like a weed and I had no idea that it could be killed but I saw it with my own two eyes. Last week I noticed a weed in the rocks surrounding our raised beds. Yep, it's mint. We'll never get rid of it now!

I really don't meal plan when we travel. I am impressed that you know what you will prepare! I am not that organized. I used to be but over the years I have gotten a bit lazy - or more of a free spirit - take your pick. I take a look at what's on hand and that's what we have for dinner.
 

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For our home timeshare, I plan out our meals in advance before leaving home, factoring in what restaurants we want to visit and what we want to cook at the resort. We are at about 50-50 dining out and eating in. We typically have fruit, yogurt, and granola for breakfast and salads, sandwiches or leftovers (usually from our restaurant meals) for lunch. Our home resort (Charter Club of Marco Beach) has a wonderful huge gas grill that can be used (at least pre-Covid) by multiple people at once. My husband enjoys socializing at the grill! We typically have grilled chicken, grilled steak and grilled shrimp or scallops during our stay. I bring a set of salt and pepper shakers plus spice mixes in our luggage. We always seek out local farmer's market for fresh veggies to grill as well as fruit for breakfast and snacks. Sometimes, I will bring along Martha White muffin mixes (just add water) or shelf-stable packets of rice mixes or Trader Joe's shelf-stable Indian veggie mixes. I have been doing that less in the past couple of years as we try to move away from processed foods.
 

dioxide45

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It seems like we always pick up a Costco chicken and a bagged Caesar salad and have that for a couple of meals. If I am going by car and I feel like dragging a crockpot, I sometimes make pulled pork with the easiest recipe in the world. I am thinking of calling ahead next time I want bring this and seeing if I can get a crockpot from the resort. This recipe has over 5000 five star reviews on allrecipes website.

SLOW COOKER PULLED PORK
  • 1 (2 pound) pork tenderloin
  • 1 (12 fluid ounce) can or bottle root beer
  • 1 (18 ounce) bottle your favorite barbecue sauce
  • hamburger buns, split and lightly toasted

Place the pork tenderloin in a slow cooker; pour the root beer over the meat. Cover and cook on low until well cooked and the pork shreds easily, 6 to 7 hours. (Note: the actual length of time may vary according to individual slow cooker, my crockpot cooks a lot faster.) Drain well. Stir in barbecue sauce. (I prefer to provide on the side since not everyone likes the same amount of sauce.) Serve on hamburger buns. I usually add a premade bag of coleslaw with dressing on the side to serve as a condiment. I have added sliced onions and used other cuts of pork as well.
In my opinion pork tenderloin makes for a very dry and aweful pulled pork. There simply isn't enough fat marbled in the meat and the grain of the meat is too short and too fine. Go for a bone in pork shoulder. I often do this in the pressure cooker (cooked using the slow cook method for 10 hours) I cut a large onion in quarters, put it in the pressure cooker with the pork shoulder with about two cups of water. I will also pour in some blasphemous liquid smoke and cook for 10 hours. You can then warm up some BBQ sauce and use it to top the pulled pork after it is cooked. I don't cook it with the pork. I like Sticky Fingers sauces from the grocery store, but that is probably something you will only find in the Southeast, though we could find it back in Ohio.
 

CPNY

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silentg

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Since he retired in August 2019,my husband has been doing most of the cooking, he enjoys it. He is a good cook!
When we went to Virginia, he went to Food Lion and bought enough food for the whole stay. We brought some things with us since we drove to the timeshare. Coffee, pasta, cereal, spices. We ate at the restaurant at the resort the first night, after a long day driving. But then we had chicken two nights, potatoes, vegetables. Another night we had pasta, and we had cold cuts and chicken salad for lunches. Breakfast we had cereal, juice coffee and bagels. On our way home we stopped at Denny’s for breakfast. It was a nice to go away for a few days and still practicing social distancing and mask wearing.
 

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We have a tote stored at the resort in Mexico with a crock pot, kitchen knives, and various paper and plastic items remaining at the end of our vacation. With the crock pot, we can enjoy the beach or pool and do not have to check and stir it every hour. Save quite a bit of money by eating in the room and not paying the All Inclusive fees charged by the resort. I am diabetic and prefer not to drink alcohol and try to watch my diet (most of the time). Resort food can be costly during a 4 to 6 week vacation.
 

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We usually eat dinner out at least half of the time. I will grill steaks, hamburgers, hot dogs, or chops for dinner served along with some salad and a starch. In locations with good seafood available, I make my own adaption of Pasta Primavera with lots of sautéed fresh veggies (peppers, onions, mushrooms, zucchini, etc.) and than add Shrimp sautéed in a white wine butter sauce. It is a lot of work but it is a special treat during vacation. We also make traditional pasta with jarred red sauce (or occasionally bring our own homemade meat sauce).

Lunch is usually sandwiches, fruit, and chips. Breakfasts are mix of eggs and toast, cereal and yogurt, or rarely pancakes with berries. Will occasionally go out for breakfast or lunch if it fits in with the sightseeing plans for the day or there is someplace special we want to try.

--Jon
 

NOLA47

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I’ve been reading this thread and can’t resist adding something. We take a couple of driving family vacations each year with a big group - about a group of 12-14. We’ve tried eating out with each family taking a turn one night choosing the restaurant and picking up the tab for everyone. While that is fun for some, it’s no fun for the younger kids (and frankly some of the older ones too) waiting for a party that size to be served. Also, the kids don’t want to stop what they are doing to get cleaned up to go out to dinner. Now, just about all our meals are at the resort unless the kids go off on their own and eat out on occasion. Included in our grocery run when we arrive are cold cuts for sandwiches at the beach.

i use a rolling cart to pack spices and things we use all the time or that I already have on hand at home so that we don’t have to buy them on vacation. At both locations we use the outdoor grills A LOT! Our family loves grilled weiners, burgers, steaks and fish. We have even grilled lobster tails. We enjoy some pretty nice meals by cooking ourselves. I also cook gumbo and red beans ahead of time and bring so that I just have to warm in a crock pot. In the evening when it’s time to wind down, someone will bake cookies and/or pop popcorn. Ice cream is a staple to eat alone or with those warm cookies.

Over the years, I’ve generated a list of things to remember (specific to the location) including items for the beach. The list has changed over the years and as the kids get older but I can’t tell you how helpful those lists have been. We take photos throughout the vacation and at the end I make a photo book for each family. I set up the photo book but wait for a nice coupon from Picaboo to purchase it. The books are priceless. When we are all together, we pull those books out and have the best laughs.

one last tip.... if we have eggs left at the end of the week, I boil them the night before and have them for a quick breakfast or for the ride home since we don’t have time to nor the desire to cook on the morning we check out if the resorts.
 
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mchct

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Wow, these ideas for meals in your timeshare kitchen sound great! Has anyone tried to bring an "Instant Pot" type cooker, since those function as a pressure cooker or slow cooker crock pot?

When we've stayed at the Marriott Desert Villa in Palm Springs CA (we live in Southern California, so not too far/just under 2 hours drive time), we've shopped at Costco and Sams Club and will also pick up the rotisserie chicken or pizza for no prep. Also the tamales are easy to heat in a microwave, some ready made salads are good for dinner or lunch. Plus some bagels, yogurts or other bakery items for easy breakfast.

When we go to Hawaii we usually stay at the Marriott Ko Olina or other Marriotts on the other islands. We'll also go to Costco, Sam's and local shops like Don Quijote or the local farmer's markets and pick up fruits, vegetable, & groceries for simple breakfast and things like fish, chicken, burgers or steaks to grill for dinner. We'll usually buy lunch out at a local place and get a plate lunch and the portions are always huge, so we'll eat the leftovers for dinner or bbq. I also like to buy the local desserts like malasadas or mochi or ice cream like Dave's since there's room in the freezer. In Hawaii, they have the frozen May's teriyaki burgers, chicken teriyaki and some other grilling stuff that's easy and convenient to grill. So we tend to keep it fairly simple when travelling and timeshareing in the US.

But when we go for a week stay at our home resort, Marriott Phuket Beach Club in Thailand we use our villa kitchen for most of our meals since MPB is far from the larger stores and restaurants; and while the reastaurants at the Marriott resort (MPB is integrated and shares amenities with the JW Marriott) are very good, they're very Western priced.

We hire a driver (Mr. Kom, since 2012!) on our second day for the whole day from 10 AM to 9-10 PM. We'll do any sightseeing & shopping, have lunch and dinner with Mr. Kom at great local places where most tourists would probably not be aware of (that's why it's always great to have a local person!), and do the majority of our grocery shopping in Phuket Town. Recent years, there's been a lot of development in the Mai Khao area and other resorts were built in the area so there are more local restaurants and in the past couple of years there's now a 7-11 and Family Mart within very easy walking/biking distance.

Groceries are generally very inexpensive in Thailand and we'll buy everything (chicken, pork, rice, veggies, fruit, eggs, cooking oil, noodles, coconut milk, sauce mixes, spices, vinegar, condiments, desserts, pastries, etc.) from the big supermarket chains Tesco or Big C and I'll usually bring a large soft sided cooler for the perishables, with our luggage. Mr. Kom will always ask me what groceries/fruits we want and he'll stop at several of the numerous road side local fruit vendors or tables in front of the people's houses with fresh local mangos, pineapples, lychee, rambutan and other local fruits for very cheap and perfectly ripe! If you ever get to Phuket and see the local tiny little pineapples (about the size of a hand grenade!) in season, try it as those are the best - they are super sweet, even better than the local Hawaii pineapples! On our last trip, our friends (originally from Hawaii) travelled and stayed with us and they were amazed at how good these tiny pineapples were! Many of the stands have them already bagged-cut and sliced up with the ends of the stem sticking out like a handle so it's easy to eat. Some of the weekend local street market vendors will sell these small bags of cut up pineapples, but for a bit more than the roadside stands.

Anyways, we will cook most of our meals in our villa kitchen using local ingredients because the western ingredients are much more expensive. If we go to Bangkok, we'll sometimes take a cooking class which is fun. To make it simpler, we'll buy premade curry pastes, satay seasonings, etc. and make various curries like red, yellow, green, Panang, Massaman. We'll make chicken satay, pad see ewe, pad thai, rad nah, fried rice, Tom Yum soups, and even mango sticky rice for dessert! The Marriott PB villas have a fully equipped kitchen (no dishwasher, but the maids will do your dishes with daily housekeeping!) and full sized refrig, place settings, and pretty much most cooking utensils, appliances, even a rice cooker. MPB supplies bottled water, ground coffee & decaf for the coffee maker, instant coffee tubes, teas, sugars (brown and white), creamer and salt and pepper packets and replenishes it daily and you can always ask for more. They also supply and replenish laundry detergent for the washer & dryer.

We always leave our leftover grocery supplies of dried rice, noodles, sauces, condiments, etc. with our housekeeping staff to divy up, as they always appreciate it when we ask them (and leave a note giving them permission to take the leftovers-must be the resort's policy) probably because they don't make much money. One time we really overbought (or maybe ate out a bit more than planned) and had a couple pounds of leftover chicken in the freezer and eggs in the refrigerator and they seemed very surprised that we had so much leftover. But they were happy. :)

I guess even though we're on vacation, I don't mind cooking (and cleaning as I feel a bit "odd" having the maids wash our dishes!) our meals in such a gorgeous place! And it's fun to try and recreate the recipes that we learned at the cooking class! If you ever get a chance to go to Phuket, try and stay at the Marriott Phuket Beach Club! The other Marriott timeshare, the Marriott Mai Khao resort is nice, but we prefer the MPB resort more with it's location right on the beach and integrated amenities with the JW Marriott.

Like many others, we weren't able to travel this year because of Covid 19 travel restrictions and had to push our week out to 2021 or 2022. We really miss the travel but also the inexpensive and fresh fruit from Thailand this year as some of our stores here in So Cal are charging $5 for a tiny bag of rambutan or lychee fruits where we would probably pay less than $1 for that same size bag! And the rambutan and these other "exotic" fruits aren't as sweet, tasty, and fresh as compared to Phuket! Can't wait to get travelling again! It was helpful and fun reading everyone's favorite dishes to cook in their timeshares, their tips, or what supplies and equipment they bring!

Thanks again!
Cathy
 

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All of our 5 TS's have grills, from Hawaii Marriotts to Caribbean. Hubby grills, I toss salad in a bag & nuke a couple sides. I'm also in charge of opening the wine. Viola. Done while in my jammies!
And, boy, are the people in the elevator trying to grab that grilled steak or fish off hubby's plate! We, too, pack in an insulated bag and put in the luggage - 6-8 lbs of steak/chops.
 

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I thought of something else --

Several members mentioned getting the rotisserie chickens from Sam's or Costco and also using the grills. Try cutting the chicken in half lengthwise and passing it on the grill. It is really good.

When just about everyone is in the pool, we put burgers and or wieners on the grill and I gather all the fixings, condiments and other items in my cart and bring to the grill area. When the meat is ready, we gather everyone to eat right by the grills rather than taking it back upstairs. Easy cleanup right there and the supplies are placed back in the cart to transport to the room. It is so very convenient.
 
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