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Vintage Kitchen Appliances

Timeshare Von

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<<snipped>>
:whoopie: So happy days are ahead, as after a $40 spend, a "new" one is on its way to us today! HURRAY for all of those people who never throw anything away!

It arrived today and was in mint condition . . . works perfectly. Can't wait to steam crab legs with it soon!
 

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Congratulations, and thanks for the fun thread!
 

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Same outcome with our family silver in 1979 :( As I recall the story behind our set, it was a wedding gift to my parents in 1956.

My grandmother's china had been a gift from my Uncle who owned a jewelry store. I'm not quite sure how my mother got the silver (plate, in a nice and very popular pattern [Rogers Bros. Adoration]) - but I seem to recall it being a wedding present as well. Reminds me that I still need a few knives and grapefruit spoons!
 

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Your posts about the hand cranked metal grinder brings back memories of my mother's clamped to our table. But for the life of me, I can't remember what she used it to grind! It definitely wasn't liver. We lived on a farm, and had our own meat - beef, pork and chicken - that we had butchered, so I suppose she could have been grinding some pieces. Any other popular uses for a grinder like this? I guess I must not have been eager to eat whatever it was, or I'd probably remember!
 

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I purchased two of the old oil lamps with mirrors on eBay several years ago to hang in my living room. During power outages they light up the room with enough light to read by.. . .

During our last power outage we were wondering about those. Candles and flashlights are ok for a short while, but this was four days. Maybe we'll check eBay :)
 

wackymother

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Your posts about the hand cranked metal grinder brings back memories of my mother's clamped to our table. But for the life of me, I can't remember what she used it to grind! It definitely wasn't liver. We lived on a farm, and had our own meat - beef, pork and chicken - that we had butchered, so I suppose she could have been grinding some pieces. Any other popular uses for a grinder like this? I guess I must not have been eager to eat whatever it was, or I'd probably remember!

Sausage? That would be the usual use for a grinder like this. Sausage, or sausage meat without casings. My grandmother's cranberry relish would not have been the usual purpose for it--these grinders are really made for meat.
 

glypnirsgirl

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Thankfully my mother didn't have any of those! The glasses fill the top of my buffet and have to be dusted!! I also completed my mother's silver and my grandmother's china collections from eBay. That process was a tad more costly :)

For a long time the only two things that I could do on the internet were playing bridge with my mom and ebay.

I, too, completed old vintage china on ebay. But, it was what I wanted for my new marriage. With my first husband, he chose the china, Solitaire by Lenox. Very plain.

I love my new old china. Blue Tree .

I had that club aluminum dutch oven --- in turquoise --- my first husband took it when he left. I loved that pot and I never knew what it was. It was a pot his mother had and just gave me. It was perfect for several dishes that I regularly make. Now I know how to replace it!

elaine
 

bjones9942

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During our last power outage we were wondering about those. Candles and flashlights are ok for a short while, but this was four days. Maybe we'll check eBay :)

I really enjoy my lamps. While they aren't always on eBay, they show up often enough to wait for a nice one. Make sure the wall mounting bracket is included. Expect to pay ~$100 each. If the mirror is loose from its mounting post a hot glue gun will fix it.

stmartinfan said:
Your posts about the hand cranked metal grinder brings back memories of my mother's clamped to our table. But for the life of me, I can't remember what she used it to grind! It definitely wasn't liver. We lived on a farm, and had our own meat - beef, pork and chicken - that we had butchered, so I suppose she could have been grinding some pieces. Any other popular uses for a grinder like this? I guess I must not have been eager to eat whatever it was, or I'd probably remember!

I do both hamburger and sausage (loose meat for patties and filled casings with the sausage stuffer attachment). I also make chili meat - a coarser, larger grind. As mentioned, it *can* be used for fruits (sauces and butters) and vegetables (baby food?). I believe some people used it for mince-meat pie filling. You can also make breadcrumbs with them - but a rolling pin works just fine for me.
 
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chellej

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Your posts about the hand cranked metal grinder brings back memories of my mother's clamped to our table. But for the life of me, I can't remember what she used it to grind! It definitely wasn't liver. We lived on a farm, and had our own meat - beef, pork and chicken - that we had butchered, so I suppose she could have been grinding some pieces. Any other popular uses for a grinder like this? I guess I must not have been eager to eat whatever it was, or I'd probably remember!

My mom always used hers to grind up ham for ham salad or ham croquettes.

I use my food processor but it just isn't the same consistancy
 

bjones9942

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I, too, completed old vintage china on ebay. But, it was what I wanted for my new marriage. With my first husband, he chose the china, Solitaire by Lenox. Very plain.

I love my new old china. Blue Tree .

elaine

My grandmother's china is Shelley Sheraton (the pink ones - I like the blue better).

shelley.jpg


I use my pattern, Noritake Sweet Leilani as my everyday dishes.
sweetleilani.jpg
 

MuranoJo

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We still have my DH's grandmother's hand grinder, which mounts on the countertop or table. The only times I used it were when we were first married and I'd make a fresh cranberry jello salad. Brought a smile when someone else said they liked the sounds of the cranberries popping.

I think the original use was mainly for grinding meats.

Cook's Illustrated publication has a 'What is it?' section for each issue, where people send in photos of unusual, usually very old, kitchen gadgets. There's quite a collectibles market out there for some of these items.
 

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I use my pattern, Noritake Sweet Leilani as my everyday dishes.
sweetleilani.jpg

I really like this pattern! I have a Noritake set my MIL gave me years ago, but this thanksgiving, with 16 people at the table, I just didn't want to bother with the handwashing. But it's very nice china.
 

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I really like this pattern! I have a Noritake set my MIL gave me years ago, but this thanksgiving, with 16 people at the table, I just didn't want to bother with the handwashing. But it's very nice china.

Thanks! I have a service for 16 :eek: - with the exception of the cream ('rimmed') soup bowls (nine so far). I also don't have the luncheon plates (I have 16 pieces of a 1960's [anchor hocking lunch plate + cup]), and only have one coffee mug and espresso cup. The handwashing isn't a problem ... it's the fact that they can't (no, they can't - don't believe the advertisments) go into the microwave that I don't like!
 

Timeshare Von

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My grandmother's china is Shelley Sheraton (the pink ones - I like the blue better).

shelley.jpg

Those are really beautiful . . . so ornate. Thanks for sharing w/ us!
 

pjrose

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Vintage China

Oh, what pretty pretty china patterns!

I have never used my "good" china b/c when I was 21 I made a bad choice, and picked a really ostentatious pattern. Way too formal and pretentious. I should sell it all on eBay or Replacements.com - each piece still in its little plastic wrapping with the sawdust from shipping from London :eek:

However I have my Mom's and my Mother-in-Law's patterns in corner cabinets, and find it quite interesting how similar they are - their silver patterns are also similar. I guess both were popular styles in the 30s. I use them occasionally.

Mom's Wedgwood -
http://www.ebay.com:80/itm/WEDGWOOD-china-TINTERN-AL9490-pttrn-DESSERT-PLATE-/280153227033

Mother-in-Law's Spode-
http://chinafinders.com/Spode/spherpl.jpg
 
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MuranoJo

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One of my collector obsessions about 15 years ago was Vernonware Gingham. After seeing this post, I went to Amazon and they pushed me to Replacements.com, and I discovered I may need to document and photograph my collection, given the prices they charge for just a single piece.

Here are some examples. (40's-50's mostly)
 

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My mother's china pattern was Franciscan Apple pattern, which to be honest, I never liked. BUT I am now using it for everyday. We have a lot of extras to the set.

I went to Borders during their close-out sale with a 10 dollar gift certificate, and ended up buying napkins. This was early fall, so I bought some with apples and leaves on them. Lo and behold, they are nearly a perfect match for the Franciscan ware! Now I wish I had bought more napkins!!
 

pjrose

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One of my collector obsessions about 15 years ago was Vernonware Gingham. After seeing this post, I went to Amazon and they pushed me to Replacements.com, and I discovered I may need to document and photograph my collection, given the prices they charge for just a single piece.

Here are some examples. (40's-50's mostly)

That is really unique china. I have this thing against green, but if it were in blue and white/cream perhaps with some rose accents, I'd start looking for it!

Replacement's prices are outrageous; you could get on their lists for both buying it and selling it to them to see the difference; you'll get lists in the mail every few months. eBay's prices for completed sales are likely more realistic. I just went to eBay and found that Organdie and Homespun are similar, but brown/yellow colors, and look like they'd be great to mix and match. No blue pattern, though :(
 
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stmartinfan

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Sausage? That would be the usual use for a grinder like this. Sausage, or sausage meat without casings. My grandmother's cranberry relish would not have been the usual purpose for it--these grinders are really made for meat.

After thinking about it some more, I think cranberries are the answer...My mother also made a wonderful fresh cranberry relish, and she wouldn't have had any other tool to grind them up.

I didn't end up with the grinder when she moved out of her house, but I do have two of her relish trays. They were large round clear glass plates divided into sections that sat on a small "silver" centerpiece that spun like a lazy susan. Holiday meals always included that tray filled with several kinds of pickles (sweet and dill), candied apples and a few other similar items. I never think to stock up on items to fill it - simple to do but a fun addition to a meal.
 

MuranoJo

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That is really unique china. I have this thing against green, but if it were in blue and white/cream perhaps with some rose accents, I'd start looking for it!

Replacement's prices are outrageous; you could get on their lists for both buying it and selling it to them to see the difference; you'll get lists in the mail every few months. eBay's prices for completed sales are likely more realistic. I just went to eBay and found that Organdie and Homespun are similar, but brown/yellow colors, and look like they'd be great to mix and match. No blue pattern, though :(

How about this--same pattern but in blue/cream/rose?

I actually ended up getting a sample of every color of this pattern, just to have it and I have one of these calico samples. It really is very hard to find, at least out here in the West.

Edited to add: These are handpainted, and you may see quite a variance in the color applications. I learned to get quite picky with the vibrance of the colors.
 
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MuranoJo

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My mother's china pattern was Franciscan Apple pattern, which to be honest, I never liked. BUT I am now using it for everyday. We have a lot of extras to the set.

I have a friend who collected the Franciscan ivy pattern.
By now you may see I'm (or was) pretty obsessive about collecting the older dinnerware. :)
 

wackymother

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After thinking about it some more, I think cranberries are the answer...My mother also made a wonderful fresh cranberry relish, and she wouldn't have had any other tool to grind them up.

I didn't end up with the grinder when she moved out of her house, but I do have two of her relish trays. They were large round clear glass plates divided into sections that sat on a small "silver" centerpiece that spun like a lazy susan. Holiday meals always included that tray filled with several kinds of pickles (sweet and dill), candied apples and a few other similar items. I never think to stock up on items to fill it - simple to do but a fun addition to a meal.

I know that kind of tray! You should try to use it sometime. Occasionally I remember to put out little things like that before a meal, and my guests always love it. Do you have a pickle store near you? Or does your grocery store have an olive bar? Either of those makes it easy to fill up the little trays. Way too easy, actually; the little bowls always runneth over.

My grandmother would grind an apple and an orange into her relish, too, so those also went through the grinder. Sometimes we would add a peeled pear.
My MIL makes cranberry relish, too, and it's good...but not as good as Grandma's....
 
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stmartinfan

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I know that kind of tray! You should try to use it sometime. Occasionally I remember to put out little things like that before a meal, and my guests always love it. Do you have a pickle store near you? Or does your grocery store have an olive bar? Either of those makes it easy to fill up the little trays. Way too easy, actually; the little bowls always runneth over.

My grandmother would grind an apple and an orange into her relish, too, so those also went through the grinder. Sometimes we would add a peeled pear.
My MIL makes cranberry relish, too, and it's good...but not as good as Grandma's....

The relish sounds identical to my mother's! It must have been a popular recipe in the 50s. It was wonderful with the fresh flavors and crisp texture.

I guess I've got a new idea for my next dinner party - a bountiful relish tray. I've got a good upscale grocery nearby that stocks lots of specialty brands of pickles, olive bar, etc., so I'm sure I could easily fill it if I just plan ahead.
 
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