• The TUGBBS forums are completely free and open to the public and exist as the absolute best place for owners to get help and advice about their timeshares for more than 30 years!

    Join Tens of Thousands of other Owners just like you here to get any and all Timeshare questions answered 24 hours a day!
  • TUG started 30 years ago in October 1993 as a group of regular Timeshare owners just like you!

    Read about our 30th anniversary: Happy 30th Birthday TUG!
  • TUG has a YouTube Channel to produce weekly short informative videos on popular Timeshare topics!

    Free memberships for every 50 subscribers!

    Visit TUG on Youtube!
  • TUG has now saved timeshare owners more than $21,000,000 dollars just by finding us in time to rescind a new Timeshare purchase! A truly incredible milestone!

    Read more here: TUG saves owners more than $21 Million dollars
  • Sign up to get the TUG Newsletter for free!

    60,000+ subscribing owners! A weekly recap of the best Timeshare resort reviews and the most popular topics discussed by owners!
  • Our official "end my sales presentation early" T-shirts are available again! Also come with the option for a free membership extension with purchase to offset the cost!

    All T-shirt options here!
  • A few of the most common links here on the forums for newbies and guests!

Auld lang syne

swift

TUG Lifetime Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
2,037
Reaction score
12
Points
36
Ok, I have always wondered. What is the translation of this song? Anybody know the history of it?


Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne?

For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne,
We'll tak a cup of kindness yet,
For auld lang syne!
 

ricoba

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2005
Messages
6,272
Reaction score
2
Points
323
Location
Metro Los Angeles
Long long ago, old time since, days gone by...."We'll take a cup o' kindness for the old days gone by".....

From Wikipedia:

"Auld Lang Syne" is a Scottish poem written by Robert Burns in 1788 and set to the tune of a traditional folk song (Roud # 6294). It is well known in many English-speaking countries and is often sung to celebrate the start of the new year at the stroke of midnight on New Year's Day.

The song's (Scots) title may be translated into English literally as "old long since", or more idiomatically, "long long ago"[1] or "days gone by". The phrase "Auld Lang Syne" is also used in similar poems by Robert Ayton (1570–1638), Allan Ramsay (1686-1757), and James Watson (1711) as well as older folk songs predating Burns.[2] In his retelling of fairy tales in the Scots language, Matthew Fitt uses the phrase "In the days of auld lang syne" as the equivalent of "Once upon a time." In Scots syne is pronounced like the English word sign.
 

AwayWeGo

TUG Review Crew: Expert
TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
15,760
Reaction score
1,686
Points
699
Location
McLean (Fairfax County), Virginia, USA.
Resorts Owned
Grandview At Las Vegas

[triennial - points]
Modern Translation. (Sort Of.)

Should auld acquaintance be forgot, = Should we drop all old business ?
And never brought to mind? = And totally forget about it ?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot, = Should we let bygones be bygones ?
And auld lang syne? = For old times' sake ?

For auld lang syne, my dear, = I mean, the past is so over, babe.
For auld lang syne, = And, like, it's done & gone.
We'll tak a cup of kindness yet, = So let's all just make up & start over fresh.
For auld lang syne! = For old times' sake.

-- Alan Cole, McLean (Fairfax County), Virginia, USA.​
 

wackymother

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2005
Messages
5,665
Reaction score
1,387
Points
598
Location
NJ
Alan's translation is pretty close, but would you believe I actually studied this poem in college? (English majors, what are you gonna do?)

There are actually a couple of levels of meaning here--both Alan's version, which is, "Let's let bygones be bygones and raise a cup together," and "As we grow older and our lives change and we drift apart, let's think of our old friends at this moment and remember how much we love them. Let's drink to them and the old days and to even better days to come!" That's why it's traditional for New Year's--it's about both looking back, and looking forward. And drinking, of course. :hi:
 

AwayWeGo

TUG Review Crew: Expert
TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
15,760
Reaction score
1,686
Points
699
Location
McLean (Fairfax County), Virginia, USA.
Resorts Owned
Grandview At Las Vegas

[triennial - points]
Full Disclosure.

Alan's translation is pretty close, but would you believe I actually studied this poem in college? (English majors, what are you gonna do?)
That's why it's traditional for New Year's--it's about both looking back, and looking forward. And drinking, of course.
Actually, I am a recovering English major myself. I don't remember whether I studied that poem in college. I think I was supposed to (i.e., it must have been assigned). Don't know whether I actually, er . . . ah, um, uh, you know -- like, studied it. (Too much drinking, no doubt -- back then, I mean, not now.) So it goes.

-- Alan Cole, McLean (Fairfax County), Virginia, USA.​

 

wackymother

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2005
Messages
5,665
Reaction score
1,387
Points
598
Location
NJ
Actually, I am a recovering English major myself. I don't remember whether I studied that poem in college. I think I was supposed to (i.e., it must have been assigned). Don't know whether I actually, er . . . ah, um, uh, you know -- like, studied it. (Too much drinking, no doubt -- back then, I mean, not now.) So it goes.

-- Alan Cole, McLean (Fairfax County), Virginia, USA.​


Well, Alan, this is the time for looking back. And looking forward. And drinking! :whoopie:
 
Top