• The TUGBBS forums are completely free and open to the public and exist as the absolute best place for owners to get help and advice about their timeshares for more than 30 years!

    Join Tens of Thousands of other Owners just like you here to get any and all Timeshare questions answered 24 hours a day!
  • TUG started 30 years ago in October 1993 as a group of regular Timeshare owners just like you!

    Read about our 30th anniversary: Happy 30th Birthday TUG!
  • TUG has a YouTube Channel to produce weekly short informative videos on popular Timeshare topics!

    Free memberships for every 50 subscribers!

    Visit TUG on Youtube!
  • TUG has now saved timeshare owners more than $21,000,000 dollars just by finding us in time to rescind a new Timeshare purchase! A truly incredible milestone!

    Read more here: TUG saves owners more than $21 Million dollars
  • Sign up to get the TUG Newsletter for free!

    60,000+ subscribing owners! A weekly recap of the best Timeshare resort reviews and the most popular topics discussed by owners!
  • Our official "end my sales presentation early" T-shirts are available again! Also come with the option for a free membership extension with purchase to offset the cost!

    All T-shirt options here!
  • A few of the most common links here on the forums for newbies and guests!

[2008] Plantar Fasciitis

Wonka

TUG Lifetime Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
1,066
Reaction score
1
Points
498
This started in my right heel about 7-8 months ago. I've had two cortizone injections. The first one didn't accomplish much. After the second, I started wearing tennis shoes with a heel support and the problem went away for several months. However.....it's back, now it's also bothering my left foot as well.

I'm hoping to get an appointment with my podiatrist this week. As I recall, he said I couldn't have many injections but I don't remember why.

Any suggestions? Should I see an MD of some kind?
 

Big Matt

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
6,154
Reaction score
1,618
Points
599
Location
Northern Virginia
I had a high ankle sprain two years ago and due to my favoring it I got PF. It was pretty bad and I'm an avid walker so it was getting in the way. My orthopedic surgeon had me wear a boot at night and within two weeks it was much better and I've only had very minor flare ups since.
 

Gramma5

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
420
Reaction score
0
Points
16
Location
Venice Fl area
I also struggled with PF for about 9-10 mos. I had two cortisone injections, got custom inserts, tried the night boot (hated that!) and finally took my podiatrists advice and got rid of all the cute flat sandals (even the ones with good support) and wear shoes that have good support and a heel of some sort. I also stretch daily and I stand on a stair and lower my heels to stretch them. Since I've done that, my PF is gone. Good luck, PF makes life very uncomfortable...I even stopped walking the beaches for a long time. Now I can do it without a problem!
 

DeniseM

Moderator
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
57,862
Reaction score
9,340
Points
1,849
Resorts Owned
WKORV, WKV, 2-SDO, 4-Kauai Beach Villas, Island Park Village (Yellowstone), Hyatt High Sierra, Dolphin's Cove (Anaheim)
If you use the search function (Search this Board) to search for this topic, you will find lots of good Info. in the old posts.

My husband and I both developed this at about the same time. He went to a specialist and paid for an expensive insert.

I started wearing Dr. Schols inserts (over-the-counter) and Birkenstocks, all the time, and we both fully recovered.
 

Sandy VDH

TUG Review Crew: Elite
TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
9,908
Reaction score
4,276
Points
648
Location
Houston, TX
Resorts Owned
Wynd VIP Plat GF, HGVC Elite, WM, HICV, +
I have chronic PF, part of the effects I have from my autoimmune form of arthritis.

I had done everything over the last 12 years with minimal improvement. Shots, inserts, boots, basic stretching, the usually remedies.

But it got so bad I had Physical Therapy (PT) on them (which included a variety of items, (heat, exercises, ultrasound, electric stimulation, hot wax, etc.). That has has the best and longest lasting effects. It still bothers me if I am on my feet a lot more than normal, but it is so much better. Consider investigating PT. I wish I had 10 years ago instead of suffering for so long.
 
Last edited:

applegirl

Tug Review Crew: Rookie
TUG Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2007
Messages
1,542
Reaction score
6
Points
248
Location
Apple Valley, CA
My mother has been fighting plantar fasciatis for several years now. She got good results from doing the stretches mentioned above on a consistent basis and having my father rub her foot at least once a day. She also wears shoes with good support and does not go barefoot. She wore the boot thing for a while also which was annoying but it does work. The stretches though seem to be key.

You need to investigate this as soon as possible. Don't wait.

Janna
 

mecllap

Tug Review Crew: Rookie
TUG Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2006
Messages
462
Reaction score
0
Points
16
Location
North Carolina
Doing the stretching exercises in bed before getting up, and again at night can help a lot. The best thing I did was switch to Nike Shox shoes -- took a month or two, but since I've been wearing them pretty much exclusively (altho I do wear slippers around home) I haven't had a pf problem for a few years now; they also helped my back.
I hated buying Nike, and spending that kind of money, but I swear by them now; they even wash okay and last quite a while. Got the idea from the PA at my Dr.'s -- some of the nurses wear them. Of course, if you're committed to suits and business clothes and spiffy shoes, you'll need to do something else. I was lucky and could wear them at work, and am now retired, so can wear them all the time.
 

pjrose

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2005
Messages
8,739
Reaction score
15
Points
473
Location
Central PA USA
I've gone through this twice, and it was awful. I lived on ibuprofen and have a big collection of gel shoe and heel pads.

Stretching was the most help - just regular stretching the back of the calves like you were warming up for running. The podiatrist said that while stretching the calves I was also stretching something in the foot that would help. I did my stretches each day in the shower and while brushing my teeth.

In each case it took close to a year to go away, but it eventually did. HOWEVER, I can't walk around barefoot on hard surfaces anymore - after just a short time my heels start to hurt, reminding me to get on some springy shoes or slippers.
 

dougp26364

TUG Review Crew: Expert
TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
14,539
Reaction score
3,257
Points
698
Location
Kansas
Resorts Owned
Marriott Grand Chateau
Marriott Shadow Ridge
Marriott Ocean Pointe
Marriott Destination Club Points
Hilton Grand Vacation Club Las Vegas Blvd
Grand Colorado on Peak 8
Spinnaker French Quarter Resort Branson
My wife has had it very bad in booth feet. It started when she was working as a CNA on had tile/concrete floors and was unable to sit down very often in a 12 hour shift.

She went through everything there was to do. Physical therapy, ultrasound to the feet, tissue harvest/grafting (they take 40 ml of blood out, spin it down and reinject it into the feet), cortisone shots, stretching, wearting the boots at night et...... I figure I went into debt somewhere in the neighborhood of $10,000 over the course of a 12 to 18 months with little to no improvement.

What has worked best has been finding shoes that actually fit her feet properly. In her case, she's had to go with shoes that come in European sizing. For some reason she can find the right size easier and in her case, she's fallen in love with the Ecco brand of shoe. She has even been able to were her custom fit orthopedic inserts with her Ecco's without experiencing a lot of pain and discomfort.

The other thing she had to do was transfer to a job that got her off her feet. She now sits for the better part of her 12 hour shift rather than be on her feet for most of 12 hours. Getting off her feet has made the largest improvement in her ability to walk.

She still has pain if she walks much more than 1/2 mile but, she use to have extreme pain walking any distance at all. For a time all she could were were Croc's and those really aren't that good for PF. It's just that they felt better on her feet and didn't hurt her so much to walk.
 

Wonka

TUG Lifetime Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
1,066
Reaction score
1
Points
498
Nike Shox - Cortisone injections

Thanks for all the replies

We live in FL, and this started after I was wearing casual loafers without sox almost all the time (like others do here in FL). They had very little support. I had worn sandals at times, but not too often. We also walk a lot, and I do wear tennis shoes. I'm sure my problem started from not wearing shoes with enough support often enough.

After my last Cortisone shot, I started wearing tennis shoes 99% of the time, except when were at the beach which is infrequently and the last couple hours of the night watching television (no shoes). As I said in my earlier post, the problem disappeared for a few months, I suppose I slipped back into my hold habits a little, but not very much. I wore the slip on shoes out to dinner a couple of times.

I'm going to take a look at the Nike Shox shoes today. What's different about them compared to other good tennis shoes? Do they have more support? I am currently wearing Addidas that are supposed to have extra heel support.

Last, does anyone know the risk of additional Cortisone injections? I thought I read somewhere where too many injections can cause a tendon to collapse. I wonder if that's true of the tendon in my foot.
 

Beaglemom3

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
4,026
Reaction score
92
Points
433
Location
Boston
Wonka, I had it, big-time.
My nephew, a DPM, recommended something that was, I thought, counter-intuitive to resolving my problem. He sent me some very hard-molded plastic heel inserts for my shoes. Presto-changeo! It did the job. Hasn't returned and it's been 5 years.
If I still had them, I'd mail them to you, but I gave them to a friend and it worked for her.
Hope you mend well.
B
 

matbec

TUG Review Crew
TUG Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2007
Messages
359
Reaction score
9
Points
378
Location
GTA, ON, Canada
I'm going to take a look at the Nike Shox shoes today. What's different about them compared to other good tennis shoes? Do they have more support? I am currently wearing Addidas that are supposed to have extra heel support.

I, too, have had to deal with PF. Had the anti-inflammatories, physical therapy, stretching exercises, ultrasound treatments, orthopedic sandals, motion control running shoes, and finally cortisone injections. Eventually, it did go away with some minor flare-ups as others have described, but treatable with the stretching. I also tend to wear the orthopedic sandals as slippers when at home, which helps keep the pain at bay.

Would suggest that you look at shoe brands that have some or full motion control as those will have better arch and heel support. I've had New Balance and Saucony - both are really good running shoes with excellent arch and heel support. Also, go to a store that specializes in foot care and they should be able to point you to a good shoe. I find that a specialty running store has very knowledgeable staff when it comes to this type of shoe.

Good luck and hope you get relief from the pain.
 

rickandcindy23

TUG Review Crew: Elite
TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
32,340
Reaction score
9,276
Points
1,049
Location
The Centennial State
Resorts Owned
Wyndham Founder; Disney OKW & SSR; Marriott's Willow Ridge and Shadow Ridge,Grand Chateau; Val Chatelle; Hono Koa OF (3); SBR(LOTS), SDO a few; Grand Palms(selling); WKORV-OF ,Westin Desert Willow.
I solved my problems in two weeks with a seated calf-raise machine that we purchased for our weight room. It was about $300 and worth every penny.
 

Wonka

TUG Lifetime Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
1,066
Reaction score
1
Points
498
Wonka, I had it, big-time.
My nephew, a DPM, recommended something that was, I thought, counter-intuitive to resolving my problem. He sent me some very hard-molded plastic heel inserts for my shoes. Presto-changeo! It did the job. Hasn't returned and it's been 5 years.
If I still had them, I'd mail them to you, but I gave them to a friend and it worked for her.
Hope you mend well.
B

I ordered a pair of heel supports for Plantar faciitis on the internet and have been wearing them in my tennis shoes for about 10 days after this started. They haven't really helped much.
 

pjrose

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2005
Messages
8,739
Reaction score
15
Points
473
Location
Central PA USA
I also have some of the boots designed for this. They are just for sleeping and sitting around the house. They keep the ankle in a 90 degree angle, so the foot isn't straightening. This keeps a continuous light stretch that helps a lot. There are lots of different kinds on the internet or you can get them at a medical supply store or through your doctor. Price ranges from $20 each up to around $80 each.

Taping the foot is also helpful - ask your podiatrist how, or PM me. The right taping pulls up your arch and stabilizes the foot. Arch support is critical - When your arches are flat, your foot loses springiness, and that contributes to heel pain.

Good shoes are essential. We are fortunate to have a family owned shoe store that has been in business close to 100 years, where they really know how to fit you and only carry high quality shoes - athletic, orthopedic, whatever. When I walk in and look at something the owner immediately knows if it will work for me or not! He usually picks for me, and he's always right. They also add/subtract inserts and modify as needed.

Anyway, I've had great luck with SAS, Aetrex, InStride, and Etonic. Nikes might be ok too, though you may need to add gel or other pads.

Regarding injections, I had one in my knee for something else - it only lasted a week or two - but the orthopedist said he would only do them three times a year. I guess the cortisone eventually goes through your body and is strong stuff. For a day or two after my injection my face was flushed and I felt kind of ill......perhaps it didn't stay in the knee and that's why it didn't last as long?
 
Last edited:

Wonka

TUG Lifetime Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
1,066
Reaction score
1
Points
498
I also have some of the boots designed for this. They are just for sleeping and sitting around the house. They keep the ankle in a 90 degree angle, so the foot isn't straightening. This keeps a continuous light stretch that helps a lot. There are lots of different kinds on the internet or you can get them at a medical supply store or through your doctor. Price ranges from $20 each up to around $80 each.

Taping the foot is also helpful - ask your podiatrist how, or PM me. The right taping pulls up your arch and stabilizes the foot. Arch support is critical - When your arches are flat, your foot loses springiness, and that contributes to heel pain.

Good shoes are essential. We are fortunate to have a family owned shoe store that has been in business close to 100 years, where they really know how to fit you and only carry high quality shoes - athletic, orthopedic, whatever. When I walk in and look at something the owner immediately knows if it will work for me or not! He usually picks for me, and he's always right. They also add/subtract inserts and modify as needed.

Anyway, I've had great luck with SAS, Aetrex, InStride, and Etonic. Nikes might be ok too, though you may need to add gel or other pads.

Regarding injections, I had one in my knee for something else - it only lasted a week or two - but the orthopedist said he would only do them three times a year. I guess the cortisone eventually goes through your body and is strong stuff. For a day or two after my injection my face was flushed and I felt kind of ill......perhaps it didn't stay in the knee and that's why it didn't last as long?

Today, I stopped by the Podiatrist's office and got another cordisone injection. He confirmed three injections a year is the maximum suggested. If forgot to ask why...sigh...

He gave the injection in one foot only saying it would also help the other, and also provided a prescription for inflamation (Piroxicam). I was eligible for medicare on 10/1, the nurse indicated there might be a medicare limit on injections (I'll deal with that later). My right foot feels better already. The last injection was in June and lasted until mid-October.

The podiatrist thought my Adidas shoes looked well-supported and noted the heel inserts. He suggested that the investment in custom heel inserts might be worth it, even though they are expensive.

Getting old kinda sucks.
 

jackie

TUG Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2008
Messages
85
Reaction score
0
Points
6
Location
New Haven, Missouri
I did all the things above. Finally my orthopedic surgeon did out patient
procedure with a machine that beats the bottom of your feet. In six weeks
pf was gone. I had it for 4 years. And now it has been 4 years and no
more pf. I can walk and stand all day.
 

KarenLK

TUG Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2006
Messages
1,422
Reaction score
46
Points
408
Location
near Buffalo, NY
Am I the only one who has had surgery? It was outpatient and he "cut" the tendon so that the tendon did not rub on the growth. I have been fine ever since.
 

Wonka

TUG Lifetime Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
1,066
Reaction score
1
Points
498
I did all the things above. Finally my orthopedic surgeon did out patient
procedure with a machine that beats the bottom of your feet. In six weeks
pf was gone. I had it for 4 years. And now it has been 4 years and no
more pf. I can walk and stand all day.

Do you have any more information on this procedure? What's it called? My Podiatrist said surgery was an option, but nothing like what you describe.
 

dougp26364

TUG Review Crew: Expert
TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
14,539
Reaction score
3,257
Points
698
Location
Kansas
Resorts Owned
Marriott Grand Chateau
Marriott Shadow Ridge
Marriott Ocean Pointe
Marriott Destination Club Points
Hilton Grand Vacation Club Las Vegas Blvd
Grand Colorado on Peak 8
Spinnaker French Quarter Resort Branson
Thanks for all the replies

We live in FL, and this started after I was wearing casual loafers without sox almost all the time (like others do here in FL). They had very little support. I had worn sandals at times, but not too often. We also walk a lot, and I do wear tennis shoes. I'm sure my problem started from not wearing shoes with enough support often enough.

After my last Cortisone shot, I started wearing tennis shoes 99% of the time, except when were at the beach which is infrequently and the last couple hours of the night watching television (no shoes). As I said in my earlier post, the problem disappeared for a few months, I suppose I slipped back into my hold habits a little, but not very much. I wore the slip on shoes out to dinner a couple of times.

I'm going to take a look at the Nike Shox shoes today. What's different about them compared to other good tennis shoes? Do they have more support? I am currently wearing Addidas that are supposed to have extra heel support.

Last, does anyone know the risk of additional Cortisone injections? I thought I read somewhere where too many injections can cause a tendon to collapse. I wonder if that's true of the tendon in my foot.

IMO, you'll need a good arch support and there just aren't a lot of shoes out there with good arch supports. We just stopped by The Walking Company store and picked up a new pair of Ecco shoes for the wife and orthotic inserts for both of us. The last pair we purchased from The Walking Company lasted us over 2 years. They're not inexpensive at $70 per pair but, they've made a world of difference for my wife's feet and done wonders for mine as well since I'm on my feet a lot at work.

I've found that I can buy the inexpensive $29 Avia's at Kohl's when there on sales and put these soft orthotics in them and do much better than spending $100 to $200 on a pair of shoes that will have the insoles wore out in a few months.
 

dougp26364

TUG Review Crew: Expert
TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
14,539
Reaction score
3,257
Points
698
Location
Kansas
Resorts Owned
Marriott Grand Chateau
Marriott Shadow Ridge
Marriott Ocean Pointe
Marriott Destination Club Points
Hilton Grand Vacation Club Las Vegas Blvd
Grand Colorado on Peak 8
Spinnaker French Quarter Resort Branson
I did all the things above. Finally my orthopedic surgeon did out patient
procedure with a machine that beats the bottom of your feet. In six weeks
pf was gone. I had it for 4 years. And now it has been 4 years and no
more pf. I can walk and stand all day.

Do you have any more information on this procedure? What's it called? My Podiatrist said surgery was an option, but nothing like what you describe.

It's an osetron and it didn't do sqaut for my wife. It was expensive, they put my wife under general anesthesia so she would be more relaxed when they did it and, while her feet were a little better, she still couldn't walk very far without a lot of pain. It's not something either I or she would recomend.
 

BSQ

TUG Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2005
Messages
791
Reaction score
0
Points
16
Location
Los Angeles & Charlotte
for me good arch support was the key. I developed a touch of this last year. It took 6 months before it cleared up and has not returned. My doctor just had me use arch supports and actually the only shoe I could wear that didn't cause it to flair up where my Crocs. Bless those ugly rubber shoes.
 

dougp26364

TUG Review Crew: Expert
TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
14,539
Reaction score
3,257
Points
698
Location
Kansas
Resorts Owned
Marriott Grand Chateau
Marriott Shadow Ridge
Marriott Ocean Pointe
Marriott Destination Club Points
Hilton Grand Vacation Club Las Vegas Blvd
Grand Colorado on Peak 8
Spinnaker French Quarter Resort Branson
Am I the only one who has had surgery? It was outpatient and he "cut" the tendon so that the tendon did not rub on the growth. I have been fine ever since.

Both of the poditrist's my wife saw and our family doctor recommended against this procedure, even as a last resort. I don't know how good or bad that advice was but, since it was consistant we took it as good advice. It may be an individual thing where some people are better candidates for the surgery than others. :crash:
 

Glynda

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2005
Messages
3,794
Reaction score
2,581
Points
599
Location
Charleston, SC
Resorts Owned
Bluegreen Points Lodge Alley Inn.
Brewster Green (two weeks).
Surgery

Am I the only one who has had surgery? It was outpatient and he "cut" the tendon so that the tendon did not rub on the growth. I have been fine ever since.

Normally, surgery isn't recommended. The condition is caused by inflammation which causes a tear and bleeding. The blood calcifies and becomes a spur. To operate puts one at risk of more bleeding, more calcification, the creation of more spurs. Not saying it always happens, it's a risk.

The "cure" is to treat the inflammation. As long as there is no inflammation, one doesn't feel the spur. There are numerous methods. I tried everything (except surgery)...shots, prescription, special shoes, physical therapy. Loosing weight worked for me.
 
Top