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Why do we haggle over car prices?

Carta

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Price of eggs: $1.19, price of tv: $439, price of cell phone: $189, etc., etc.............
Everything in the US has a set price. Why are cars any different?
Thanks......
 

teepeeca

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Most merchandise/food in the United States has a "list", or asking price. There is no law (that I know of) that says that you can't "haggle" over any asking price.

Cars, being a "major" (expensive) purchase, can be singled-out as an item to "haggle". about the price. Have you ever "haggled" about the price of a house? I doubt that you just paid the "asking price" --- LOL !!!

Tony
 

Passepartout

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Price of eggs: $1.19, price of tv: $439, price of cell phone: $189, etc., etc.............
Everything in the US has a set price. Why are cars any different?
Thanks......
I may not haggle over the $1.19 eggs, but if the store next door has them for $.99 guess where I'm shopping? I'd ask the TV guy if $439 is his best price or if $400 is OK. I just got the activation fee waived on a new phone for DW.

Everything in the US doesn't have a set price. That's why they call it a SUGGESTED list price. On cars, there are any number of websites and services that will provide you the exact price a dealer pays for his stock. If you offer him a profit, and to buy from him before he has to pay any 'flooring', or interest on his stock, he may just take you up on your offer. Especially if you are a loyal customer, have no trade, finance through his plan, or buy some dealer installed accessories. In short, everyone in business deserves to make a profit. They just have no entitlement to extraordinary profit.

Jim Ricks
 

Mosca

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I've been in retail car sales for 26 years. No one knows what a good deal is, but everyone knows that they're supposed to ask for a discount. It's all good. I think it serves a purpose, it makes customers feel more confident that they did get a good deal. When we price the cars to rock bottom, people walk on the price. But if we leave a few hundred on the table and let them ask for it, they buy and they're happy.

Happy customers? I'm in favor of that.

I'm not looking to debate car sales here. It is what it is, I've made a living at it and I'm the same person there as I am here. I take the position that I'm not smart enough to remember a bunch of lies, so I tell the truth. Everything else follows from there.
 

Sea Six

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So many retailers offer "price matching" you'd be crazy if you weren't at least prepared to show what you can get things for from their competition. Maybe not a dozen eggs, but anything of higher value, like electronics. Never hurts to ask, and you should at least know what things are being sold for before you spend your own money.
 

sjuhawk_jd

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Price of eggs: $1.19, price of tv: $439, price of cell phone: $189, etc., etc.............
Everything in the US has a set price. Why are cars any different?
Thanks......
People haggle over the asking price of already heavily discounted 5-star timeshare rentals such as Westin, Marriott and Hilton.

On our 45 day or earlier check in rental boards, we are only allowed to ask for $100 per night. Many people haggle over these discounted rates.

Haggling is becoming a national past-time. People who are not struggling financially still want a discount on their $20K Bahamas (Atlantis vacation) by asking me to discount by $300 my rental.
 
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Elan

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I don't really haggle on the price of too many things. I might bluntly tell someone they want too much for something hoping that they'll drop the price, but I seldom offer less. Cars are the exception, because haggling is the norm for buying a car and sticker price is adjusted upward accordingly.

I tend to spend a lot of time comparison shopping so I have an idea of a fair price. Then I tend to wait to buy something at that price or less. I'd rather wait than haggle. Haggling just isn't my style. Nothing wrong with it, but when I watch someone else do it, they come off as a cheapskate to me. I know that's not necessarily accurate, but it's the way I view it. Not likely to change.

My FIL likes to brag how he got a $15 item for $10, or a 2 $10 items for $16. I sit and listen to his stories, but it truly amazes me that he is that enamored with saving $5-10 here or there.
 

Carta

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I don't think so. Sounds like you overpay for everything, except cars apparently.
==============================

I hear u guys loud and clear.. I guess i should have said: "Most things in the US"..... The reason i asked this question is: When i haggle and buy a car, i always wonder if i paid too much.. You may say "if you're happy, what's the big deal?" I just can't see paying more than someone else... Which leads to buyer's remorse...

Yes, you may haggle over the price of a house, but it's not the identical house..
Believe me, I'm not losing sleep over this.. Just wanted to hear other views...Thx

ps....I'm not even looking for a car..
 

Teresa

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My cantaloupe story

A little off topic - but goes toward 'haggling' a bit.

I go to a food auction. Amish (and others) bring in their produce (and bakery - yum!) and sell via auction. About 9 months a year 3 times a week.

I used to go regularly and buy for a group of friends. Most of the auction was wholesale. You didn't buy a few pounds of apples or peaches - you bought 10-12 bushels at a time. No such thing as a dozen of corn. You bought it by the bags of 6 dozen a bag. A 'lot' might be 10 bags (so that's 60 dozen of corn!). When this auction company was getting this thing going, the prices were generally pretty low because not too many people knew about it. People started telling their friends so more buyers came out. The last few years the prices have been higher (which is good for the growers). Going to an auction is haggling at its finest!

In the earlier years, one time there were a huge amount of cantaloupes. They were everywhere. Prices were low! I bought a 'lot' of cantaloupe for 10 cents each. Can you imagine paying only 10 cents for a cantaloupe? There were 191 of 'em - a LOT of them! Had to call my husband to bring the trailer (it was during an 'important' baseball game - he wasn't too happy). Imagine - I paid $19.10 for that nearly 200 cantaloupe. They were in a large wooden 'crate' and were loaded onto the trailer with a fork lift.

I had a lot of fun giving them to people at church and neighbors. One of my friends in our group took 40 (she paid $4.00 for them) and sold 'em for 2/$1.00 by the road - sold out in 2-3 hours - she wished she had taken more. Another friend took a kid's wagon and walked around their neighborhood giving them away to their neighbors (what a delightful neighbor encounter). I got a lot of 'value' for that $19.10 and enjoy telling the story. I sold some too. Kids and I cut and froze some. Ate a lot of cantaloupe over the next week. Oh - they were DELICIOUS!

Here's a glitch to that - some of the later lots went for 5 cents a piece! Which goes to prove no matter how well you think you did haggling there's someone out there that did better! Did I pay too much? :eek: GRIN!

The problem? I have a hard time paying regular price for a cantaloupe now - even a sale price! ;)
 

caribbeansun

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Ah - that's a different question altogether. You can never be 100% sure that you haven't left money on the table in any negotiation but with commodities there tend to be a lot of information available on line if you care to take the time to do the research - it's a personal choice as to whether the payoff = time investment. As an example look at Edmunds for car data.

I would suggest however that almost everything beyond the basics (groceries and low dollar items, taxes and other government fees (and even some of those in the right situation)) is negotiable to some degree.




==============================

I hear u guys loud and clear.. I guess i should have said: "Most things in the US"..... The reason i asked this question is: When i haggle and buy a car, i always wonder if i paid too much.. You may say "if you're happy, what's the big deal?" I just can't see paying more than someone else... Which leads to buyer's remorse...

Yes, you may haggle over the price of a house, but it's not the identical house..
Believe me, I'm not losing sleep over this.. Just wanted to hear other views...Thx

ps....I'm not even looking for a car..
 
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