• The TUGBBS forums are completely free and open to the public and exist as the absolute best place for owners to get help and advice about their timeshares for more than 30 years!

    Join Tens of Thousands of other Owners just like you here to get any and all Timeshare questions answered 24 hours a day!
  • TUG started 30 years ago in October 1993 as a group of regular Timeshare owners just like you!

    Read about our 30th anniversary: Happy 30th Birthday TUG!
  • TUG has a YouTube Channel to produce weekly short informative videos on popular Timeshare topics!

    Free memberships for every 50 subscribers!

    Visit TUG on Youtube!
  • TUG has now saved timeshare owners more than $21,000,000 dollars just by finding us in time to rescind a new Timeshare purchase! A truly incredible milestone!

    Read more here: TUG saves owners more than $21 Million dollars
  • Sign up to get the TUG Newsletter for free!

    60,000+ subscribing owners! A weekly recap of the best Timeshare resort reviews and the most popular topics discussed by owners!
  • Our official "end my sales presentation early" T-shirts are available again! Also come with the option for a free membership extension with purchase to offset the cost!

    All T-shirt options here!
  • A few of the most common links here on the forums for newbies and guests!

Tests Show Most Honey Isn't Honey

DonM

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
788
Reaction score
1
Location
New Fairfield, Connecticut
A couple of observations:


If you want to insure that the honey you're buying hasn't been processed, buy only comb honey.

The article talks about organic honey. I'm not an organic expert, but I thought that organic means that no pesticides were used in the production of the food in question. Bees can travel a distance of 2 miles or more in search of nectar (honey) and pollen. They do not have leashes on them limiting their foraging.

Wouldn't a 2 mile diameter would result in an area in excess of 3 miles? That would mean that the source of the nectar would have to be cerified pesticide free in a very large area. This could only be carried out in a large farm, and the hive could not be moved out of that area for even a short period of time- unless it was to another similar site.
 
L

laurac260

A couple of observations:


If you want to insure that the honey you're buying hasn't been processed, buy only comb honey.

The article talks about organic honey. I'm not an organic expert, but I thought that organic means that no pesticides were used in the production of the food in question. Bees can travel a distance of 2 miles or more in search of nectar (honey) and pollen. They do not have leashes on them limiting their foraging.

Wouldn't a 2 mile diameter would result in an area in excess of 3 miles? That would mean that the source of the nectar would have to be cerified pesticide free in a very large area. This could only be carried out in a large farm, and the hive could not be moved out of that area for even a short period of time- unless it was to another similar site.

What, you've never seen the bee farmers out walking their bees every morning??? You need to get out more! :p
 

JudyS

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
4,193
Reaction score
216
Location
Ann Arbor, MI
...
The article talks about organic honey. I'm not an organic expert, but I thought that organic means that no pesticides were used in the production of the food in question. Bees can travel a distance of 2 miles or more in search of nectar (honey) and pollen. They do not have leashes on them limiting their foraging.

Wouldn't a 2 mile diameter would result in an area in excess of 3 miles? That would mean that the source of the nectar would have to be cerified pesticide free in a very large area. This could only be carried out in a large farm, and the hive could not be moved out of that area for even a short period of time- unless it was to another similar site.
I'm no expert on organic honey, either, but bees aren't going to travel further than is necessary to find a flower type that they like. So, if you put the hive in the middle of something like organically grown clover or buckwheat, you will get honey from organically grown flowers. Honeybees generally prefer to work on one type of flower at a time, so even if there is a small amount of non-organically grown flowers over in the next field, they will likely ignore them.
 

CSB

Tug Review Crew
TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
611
Reaction score
3
Location
Thornhill, Ontario
Thank you for posting this. I am wondering if we have the same situation here in Canada. We probably do as I think that the government has for years cut back on inspectors/inspections and left the industries to police themselves.
 

memereDoris

TUG Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2009
Messages
133
Reaction score
1
Location
Alberta, Canada
Raw (unpasteurized) honey has the most health benefits. It has never been heated over 135 degrees. It is strained to remove the larger particles. It does not remain in a liquid state. It still contains pollen.

It is being used on large wounds on horses and other livestock because of its healing qualities. Our local vets are using it more and more. The honey must be unpasteurized. I have found that it controls infection in large wounds and the healed tissue has much less scarring. Zincoderm works almost as well but is much more costly.

I live in the "Honey Capital of Canada" and we are fortunate to be able to purchase raw honey from our local beekeepers.
 

Passepartout

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2007
Messages
28,730
Reaction score
17,625
Location
Twin Falls, Eye-Duh-Hoe
Interesting article. Yet another way for the high fructose corn syrup makers to corrupt the world's appetite for 'sweet'. Seems they find their way into any market that lacks regulation, inspection and oversight.

We are fortunate here to have a guy who bottles his own bee's output and puts a couple of quarts at a time on a table by the curb with an 'honor jar' to pay for it. You can see 'stuff' suspended in it. It gets hard if it's cold, and flows like motor oil when warm. And is wonderful on warm, homemade bread.

Jim
 

MichaelColey

TUG Review Crew: Expert
TUG Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2010
Messages
4,926
Reaction score
114
Location
Mansfield, TX
Resorts Owned
Palace View Branson (4 Lockouts), Grandview (Points), CMV (UDI), DVC (SSR 25)
Yet another way for the high fructose corn syrup makers to corrupt the world's appetite for 'sweet'. Seems they find their way into any market that lacks regulation, inspection and oversight.
If you look closely at what you think is honey, much of it doesn't even claim to be honey (although they imply it). It actually says "HONEY (flavored syrup)", and by syrup they mean corn syrup. Even some of the places mentioned in the article are like that. For instance, the last time I went to KFC I asked for some butter and honey for my biscuit. They gave me a packet of margarine and a packet of honey flavored syrup.
 

CapriciousC

TUG Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2008
Messages
389
Reaction score
0
Location
Savannah, GA
We have a great place here in Savannah that sells true honey:

www.savannahbee.com

They have online ordering. If you're ever visiting Savannah, be sure and stop in at their store on Broughton Street - in addition to wonderful products, they have a huge bee skep inside that kids can play in. My daughter would spend all day in there if I let her :)
 

stonebroke

TUG Review Crew
TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
300
Reaction score
12
Location
Mid-Atlantic
From the Source

We had some friends in Eastern Montana give us a mason jar full of the milky real stuff (delicious) and that got me looking around the great plains for other sources I found this one in North Dakota http://shop.dakotahoney.com/ .
 

dmharris

TUG Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2006
Messages
2,099
Reaction score
87
Location
Butler, PA
I bought honey from a roadside market here last summer, locally produced. When I opened the jar I could smell flowers. It was the most amazing honey I've ever had. Sold out fast because I went back for me and it was gone!
 

Patri

Tug Review Crew
TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
6,832
Reaction score
4,193
A couple friends raise bees, so I buy from them. Love comb honey. Helps with allergies too, since the pollen builds up immunity.
 

MULTIZ321

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
31,693
Reaction score
9,160
Location
FT. LAUDERDALE, FL
Resorts Owned
BLUEWATER BY SPINNAKER HHI
ROYAL HOLIDAY CLUB RHC (POINTS)
"Ulee's Gold"

If you get a chance, see the 1997 movie "Ulee's Gold" starring Peter Fonda, Patricia Richardson, and Christine Dunford. Ulee is a beekeeper whose "gold" is tupelo honey.

From Wikipedia -

"Tupelos are valued as honey plants in the southeastern United States, particularly in the Gulf Coast region. They produce a very light, mild-tasting honey.

In northern Florida, beekeepers keep beehives along the river swamps on platforms or floats during tupelo bloom to produce certified tupelo honey, which commands a high price on the market because of its flavor.

Monofloral honey made from the nectar of N. ogeche has such a high ratio of fructose to glucose that it does not crystallize.

The Apalachicola River in the Florida Panhandle is the center for tupelo honey.

The honey is produced wherever tupelo trees (three species) bloom in southeastern USA, but the purest and most expensive version (which is certified by pollen analysis) is produced in this valley.

In a good harvest year, the tupelo honey crop produced by a group of specialized Florida beekeepers has a value approaching US$1,000,000."

Richard
 

persia

newbie
Joined
Nov 18, 2007
Messages
1,179
Reaction score
6
Location
Carlingford, NSW
We've been buying honey from a local apiary for years now. We know the grower. Much as I love Costco, their honey is just bad. And who in their right mind would buy honey from Walgreens/CVS?
 

ScoopKona

Guest
Joined
May 7, 2008
Messages
6,170
Reaction score
3,708
Location
Monkey King Coffee - Captain Cook, Hawaii
Our honey isn't honey. Wood pulp is added to our food. Our beef is often treated with ammonia to kill off E.Coli. Eighty percent of the chickens sold in the US are infected with campylobacter or salmonella.

I'm surprised the honey story is making the rounds now, as it's a few years old.

While the only way to be sure is to buy comb honey, any small apiary isn't going to have ultra-filtration equipment. So unless they're diluting their product with drums of Chinese "honey," it's probably 100% honey. I doubt any beekeeper worth his buzz would risk the bad press that blending would bring.
 

CapriciousC

TUG Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2008
Messages
389
Reaction score
0
Location
Savannah, GA
"Tupelos are valued as honey plants in the southeastern United States, particularly in the Gulf Coast region. They produce a very light, mild-tasting honey.

In northern Florida, beekeepers keep beehives along the river swamps on platforms or floats during tupelo bloom to produce certified tupelo honey, which commands a high price on the market because of its flavor.

We buy Tupelo honey by the gallon. My daughter and I both have pollen-related allergies, and a physician friend recommended tupelo honey, because it contains the local pollens that may be causing our allergy issues. For the last couple of years, we add it to tea, cereal, etc. every morning, and have seen a significant decrease in our allergy symptoms.

The downside is that I believe this only works if you live in the areas where the honey is harvested, so Tupelo honey would only work for those of us living in the southeast. However, I would think that locally harvested honey could potentially have similar benefits for other allergy sufferers.
 

dioxide45

TUG Review Crew: Expert
TUG Lifetime Member
Joined
May 20, 2006
Messages
48,793
Reaction score
20,236
Location
NE Florida
Resorts Owned
Marriott Grande Vista
Marriott Harbour Lake
Sheraton Vistana Villages
Club Wyndham CWA
Raw (unpasteurized) honey has the most health benefits. It has never been heated over 135 degrees. It is strained to remove the larger particles. It does not remain in a liquid state. It still contains pollen.

It is being used on large wounds on horses and other livestock because of its healing qualities. Our local vets are using it more and more. The honey must be unpasteurized. I have found that it controls infection in large wounds and the healed tissue has much less scarring. Zincoderm works almost as well but is much more costly.

I live in the "Honey Capital of Canada" and we are fortunate to be able to purchase raw honey from our local beekeepers.

Growing up in Southern Ontario Canada, my grandparents were bee keepers with a few hives that they would use to supply them and the family with honey. One night while at my grandparents I had some kind of ailment. My grandmother gave me unpasteurized honey to fix the ailment. Well, that night I never had hives so bad in my life. So it seems that I can eat honey from the store but not that which came from her house. We don't really know why I had a reaction, but I haven't had unpasteurized honey ever since.
 
Top