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replacing hot water pipes

cmdmfr

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I would like to know if anyone out there that may be involved in plumbing or knows anything about plumbing if there is any type of pipe that I can use in place of copper; I have several hot water pipes leaking and have to replace them. The old pipes are connected to a boiler and carry hot water to the baseboard heaters so the pipes will have to withstand extremely hot water for a length of time.
 
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LUVourMarriotts

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I had new baseboard installed when I finished my basement. All of the piping that lead to the baseboard is called waterPex or Pex. According to my plumber, it is what all new construction is using for running hot and cold water lines instead of copper. It's cheaper and easier. I actually installed all of the lines from near my furnace to where the baseboard was going. It was probably the easiest part of finishing that basement.
 

PigsDad

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Our ~3 yo house has PEX, and it is great. No pipe noise, and hot water gets to faucets faster since it is a point-to-point distribution system. For retrofits, I would think PEX would definitely be the way to go, simply because the labor portion would be so much less expensive.

Kurt
 

jschmidt

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PEX (Cross Linked Polyethylene) is your best bet. You can buy all the things you need at Lowe’s. It is run like wire in that you install a fitting on one end, run the PEX, cut-it and put a fitting on the other end. Use Red PEX for hot water and Blue PEX for cold water. I’ve re-piped an old farm house and had no installation problems or leaks. PEX is also being used almost exclusively in new construction in my area.

If you need a lot of fittings you may want to check here: www.pexconnection.com. I’ve been buying bigger quantities of fittings from the PEX Connection because their prices are better than Lowe’s. Because of the shipping costs, it’s cheaper to get the PEX pipe from Lowe’s. The PEX Connection also sells a "Design and Installation Guide".
 
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DonM

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I have several hot water pipes leaking and have to replace them.
Do you know why the copper pipes are failing? How are they failing? i.e. are they leaking at the soddered joints, or are
the copper pipes being "eaten away" ?

It's important to understand what the problem is before you attempt to correct it. I assume based on my own experience that your joints are failing. I say this because I have aggressive water that "ate" through my schedule M (cheap thin pipe). My problem was entirely restricted to my potable water system- not my heating system. The heating system used the same thin pipe, however when you heat the water it eliminates the aggressiveness of the water- that's why the sch M pipe is suppossed to be used on the heating system- also because the thin pipe transfers the heat better.

Do some research on the Pex. I replaced my entire home's fresh water plumbing without much trouble, and saved myself thousands. I believe the type of Pex for the heating system is different than the type I used. In addition there are many manufacturer's of the pipe and the system used to attach the pipe to the manifold etc. I used the Wirsbo system and I'm very happy. You can't mix and match systems.

Good Luck
 

cmdmfr

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Don the pipes are about 50 to 60 years old and they are just starting to get pin holes along the walls. Also the water is well water not treated but not hard water. So I figure if the pipes are that old that the pex pipe should last for a while
 

DonM

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Don the pipes are about 50 to 60 years old and they are just starting to get pin holes along the walls. Also the water is well water not treated but not hard water. So I figure if the pipes are that old that the pex pipe should last for a while

OK if the pipes have been there for that many years, I think you can assume that you've got your monies worth. (But FYI I have well water and my water is only moderately hard, and the PH is about 7.4 which is alkaline, and I have aggressive water)

As I recall you're talking about pipes for baseboard heat- and the quality of the water really doesn't come into play because the heating of the water eliminates any aggressiveness anyway.

Just remember to get the right kind of Pex for baseboard, and do some due diligence on the types of systems to join the pipes. I used a company called Pex supply and was happy

http://www.pexsupply.com/


good luck and do google Plumbing forum
 

janej

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Urgent, please help

I came across this thread just when I need it.

My water bill jumped last quarter. The water company came and found that my townhouse has a leak between water meter and main switch. I had a couple of estimates and signed a contract for getting a new water line between meter and entrance to the house for $2000. Today the contractor started working and after they cut the water pipe before it entering the house, I asked them to run a test to confirm the leak was indeed outside. They did and found that the leak is in between the entry point and main switch. They quoted me $2700 for the job now and wanted an answer by the morning.

Should I look into PEX pipe for this job? They are going to do it with cooper pipe going through the ceiling. I also have to fix a few holes on the dry wall afterward.

Please help me decide,

Jane
 

PigsDad

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I came across this thread just when I need it.

My water bill jumped last quarter. The water company came and found that my townhouse has a leak between water meter and main switch. I had a couple of estimates and signed a contract for getting a new water line between meter and entrance to the house for $2000. Today the contractor started working and after they cut the water pipe before it entering the house, I asked them to run a test to confirm the leak was indeed outside. They did and found that the leak is in between the entry point and main switch. They quoted me $2700 for the job now and wanted an answer by the morning.

Should I look into PEX pipe for this job? They are going to do it with cooper pipe going through the ceiling. I also have to fix a few holes on the dry wall afterward.
I'm no plumbing expert, but I don't think PEX would be a good choice for the water main coming into the house, because it is smaller and would not support the flow that would be needed. They might make it in larger diameters, but I have not personally seen that.

Kurt
 

janej

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Kurt,

Thanks a lot for the information. I decide to let the contractor finish the work. I am glad they did the test before replacing the outside line. It would be a lot more $$$ otherwise.

Jane
 

DonM

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I came across this thread just when I need it.

My water bill jumped last quarter. The water company came and found that my townhouse has a leak between water meter and main switch. I had a couple of estimates and signed a contract for getting a new water line between meter and entrance to the house for $2000. Today the contractor started working and after they cut the water pipe before it entering the house, I asked them to run a test to confirm the leak was indeed outside. They did and found that the leak is in between the entry point and main switch. They quoted me $2700 for the job now and wanted an answer by the morning.

Should I look into PEX pipe for this job? They are going to do it with cooper pipe going through the ceiling. I also have to fix a few holes on the dry wall afterward.

Please help me decide,

Jane
I have no experience with the water line coming into the house. Pex is available in 1" diameter

Google Plumbing forum

good luck
 
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