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People drowning at resorts and on cruise ships

WinniWoman

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Reminds me of the time when a friend of mine's dad passed away from a heart attack on a cruise ship. He was traveling with his wife and some friends to Bermuda. They were in their 80's. Because he died in international waters, his body was held in Bermuda. His wife was flown back to the states in a helicopter. It took about a week for all the paperwork and then his grandson flew to Bermuda to retrieve the body. He told us of the cab ride to the airport with the body in the trunk. The cab driver took him and "grandpa" on a final sightseeing trip before heading out to the airport.

Two weeks after his death they were able to have his funeral here in the states.
 

Pat H

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It's unlikely an AED would have helped someone who was drowning. It's a common misconception that AED's START hearts. They do not. They shock the heart back to a normal rhythm. That said, I'm a firm believer in AED's. I am on a committee where I live and over the past few years we have gotten the Board of Directors to add several AED's on property, including golf courses.

If you are ever in a situation where an AED needs to be used, don't be afraid to use it. The A stands for Automatic and the machine is easy to use. You just turn it on and it tells you what to do. You really can't hurt someone by using it. If the AED can't help the victim because there is no hearbeat, it will tell you to continue CPR.
 

Passepartout

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http://www.cruiselawnews.com/2015/0...s-cruises-criticized-after-passenger-drowned/

Maybe Princess might assign at least one English speaking waiter to each swimming pool now?

While swimming in one of the pools at http://VelasVallarta.com earlier in February 2015 (or maybe October 2014) a woman walking in the water near me and asked if I was angry that Mr. Velas does not have a Defibrillator at the resort? Apparently she was participating in the daily water aerobics class at the other pool with approximately 40-50 other guests and suddenly the class realized a man was drowning less than 20 feet from them. She said she ran to her husband, a medical doctor about 100 feet away in the middle pool while some of the other guests with medical training (at least three medical doctors licensed in either USA or Canada) were in the pool or area, numerous nurses etc and apparently she was still in shock in the afternoon that the resort does not have a Defibrillator because maybe the resort guest had a heart attack or other problem and if the resort owned a Defibrillator and put it perhaps in the towel hut or near the resort life guard stand that medically trained hotel guests could have helped the drowning man. Apparently when you die in swimming pools in foreign countries or onboard cruise ships, your family needs to lower their expectations. I think cruise ships with put dead passenger bodies in refrigerated compartments until they reach the next port or later and ship to deliver to the local governments.

Is there really a question, request, or practical information here? People die all the time, sadly, sometimes while away from home. Yes, automatic defibrillators should be fairly handy wherever people are- just like fire extinguishers. Along with hand rails and ramps. It just takes the rest of the world a little longer to comply with U.S. standards that they are not subject to.

Much better- and something we can all do, is to learn CPR.

I guess one should check their travel insurance to see if it covers repatriation of a remains, should one expire while traveling. We had a shirt-tail relative who traveled to the Philippines for 'marginal' (my word) medical treatment for cancer. It didn't work, and he died there. His family are not people of means. He had no insurance to bring back his remains. It was decided to have him cremated there, then his son could bring the 'cremains' back in luggage to be interred as they wished, nearer home.

Jim
 

geekette

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Is there really a question, request, or practical information here? People die all the time, sadly, sometimes while away from home. Yes, automatic defibrillators should be fairly handy wherever people are- just like fire extinguishers. Along with hand rails and ramps. It just takes the rest of the world a little longer to comply with U.S. standards that they are not subject to.

Much better- and something we can all do, is to learn CPR.

I guess one should check their travel insurance to see if it covers repatriation of a remains, should one expire while traveling. We had a shirt-tail relative who traveled to the Philippines for 'marginal' (my word) medical treatment for cancer. It didn't work, and he died there. His family are not people of means. He had no insurance to bring back his remains. It was decided to have him cremated there, then his son could bring the 'cremains' back in luggage to be interred as they wished, nearer home.

Jim

Unclear to me as well, but many many pools are "swim at your own risk" so I would not expect an English-speaking "waiter" at each pool.
 

VegasBella

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apparently she was still in shock in the afternoon that the resort does not have a Defibrillator because maybe the resort guest had a heart attack or other problem and if the resort owned a Defibrillator and put it perhaps in the towel hut or near the resort life guard stand that medically trained hotel guests could have helped the drowning man.

Just for the record, anyone can use a defibrillator. You don't need any training at all to use one. Just rip it off the wall and open it up. Press start or whatever and it literally tells you what to do. The only thing you'd need is to understand the directions. It's very simple.

See this: http://www.redcross.org/prepare/location/workplace/easy-as-aed

I agree with Passepartout that everyone should learn CPR. But again, this is still something anyone can do, even with very little training. The key is simply to be able to ensure that they don't have a heartbeat (do NOT do CPR on someone with a pulse) and then to do chest compressions over the heart. You don't need to breathe, you don't need to be super specific timing-wise, you just have to pump blood to the brain, that's all.

See this: http://www.redcross.org/prepare/hands-only-cpr
 

Ty1on

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Unclear to me as well, but many many pools are "swim at your own risk" so I would not expect an English-speaking "waiter" at each pool.

Maybe we should start requiring Russian, Chinese, and Swedish speaking waitresses and bartenders at Las Vegas pools, too!
 

x3 skier

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Coming up on my first "birthday" after being revived with CPR and a couple of shots from an AED. Highly recommended if your heart stops like mine did (or whatever it did that caused a Physician to start CPR after I hit the floor). :)

Cheers
 

puppymommo

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Coming up on my first "birthday" after being revived with CPR and a couple of shots from an AED. Highly recommended if your heart stops like mine did (or whatever it did that caused a Physician to start CPR after I hit the floor). :)

Cheers

Happy Birthday! We're glad you're here!
 

Patri

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We sure are x3. No wonder you sign off Cheers. Life is to be celebrated.
 
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