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peaches

Rose Pink

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I planted a mini peach tree last year. It isn't supposed to get bigger than five feet by five feet. It looks so cute and has some nice large fruit this year. The peaches are a good color and texture but have very little sweetness or flavor. I am wondering if the lack of flavor is caused by the variety or if it has something to do with the growing conditions. I'd hate to have to rip it out but if this is how the fruit is always going to taste, it isn't worth the space it is taking up. Any ideas?
 

DonM

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The variety does make a difference. The best tasting peaches I ever had were from a tree I planted. I forget the variety, but besides the great taste, it was also susceptible to bacterial spot- so the tree didn't last long.

The tree I now have doesn't carry the disease, but the fruit isn't as tasty- but the squirrels don't seem to mind it!

Another thing to remember is that once the fruit is picked, it's flavor will no longer develope. You can't pick it before it's ripe- unlike bananas or other fruit, the fruit will soften but the flavor won't improve- so resist the impulse to pick it too soon.

don
 

Rose Pink

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...once the fruit is picked, it's flavor will no longer develope. You can't pick it before it's ripe- unlike bananas or other fruit, the fruit will soften but the flavor won't improve- so resist the impulse to pick it too soon.

don
Thanks for taking the time to reply, Don. The fruit is fully ripe, just not as flavorful as I'd expected. This is what I have:
http://www.millernurseries.com/cart.php?m=product_detail&p=79
This picture shows the fruit on the tree. You can't see the fruit on mine as it is completely hidden by foliage. I almost forgot I had peaches until I saw one that had fallen to the ground.
 

wackymother

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I wouldn't yank it out just yet. Give it a few more years. All kinds of fruit (and vegetables) have good years and bad years. We pick apples at the same orchard near us every year, and some years the apples are fantastic, sweet and crisp, and some years the same varieties are mealy and bland. Temperature and rainfall play a part.

I didn't click on your link--do you know the cultivar? If you do, you could ask your county agricultural extension agent about it or post on a peach-growing forum; there must be one out there! Good luck!
 

Rose Pink

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I was wondering if it got too much shallow water. One of the peaches had fallen to the ground this morning and it shattered and goo came out. I picked the last three peaches. The largest one had a black area. I cut it out but the rest of the peach didn't taste peachy. It was sort of mushy but not juicy. I don't know the cultivar. The link doesn't specify. I think it is graft to make it miniature.
 

wackymother

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Well, I would give it a few more years if the peaches were gooey like that. Could the peaches have been overripe rather than underripe? It sounds like they may have gotten away from you, and many peaches are at their prime in July, not August.

Does the area have poor drainage in general? Do call the county agricultural agent; maybe he/she be able to tell you what happened and will have some tips on improving the drainage, pruning, enriching the soil, whatever. A dwarf peach tree that produces full-size peaches in one year sounds pretty nice to me, so it might be worth some extra trouble.
 

Rose Pink

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I shall spare the little thing. It really is cute. I am going to prune it as I did not do so last year. It has alot of little branches in the center--really rather crowded. I was wondering if the fruit was too ripe. Does the sugar content go down in peaches when they are too ripe? It has excellent drainage. I planted it on a raised island in lots of fresh soil and compost.
 

Passepartout

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Heck, if nothing else the tree will have pretty flowers in the spring and sliced into a bowl of ice cream, even store-bought cardboardy peaches taste pretty good.

Jim Ricks
 

Chrisky

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Hi. This is what I know about peach trees. Some of which has been mentioned.
They require good drainage, and will not grow in waterlogged or heavy soils. Soil should dry out before thoroughly watering. They should get fertilized about once every 10 days. The trees should be pruned to get air and sun into the tree. When you see little fruit forming, some of them should be removed. You'll have a little less fruit, but probably bigger.
If the fruit was mushy in the center they might have been too ripe.
I agree, keep the tree, and see what happens next year. Whenever we plant trees, I always give the trees at least 3 years, to get used to the soil and it's new conditions.
 

wackymother

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I am going to prune it as I did not do so last year. It has alot of little branches in the center--really rather crowded. I was wondering if the fruit was too ripe. Does the sugar content go down in peaches when they are too ripe? It has excellent drainage. I planted it on a raised island in lots of fresh soil and compost.
With pruning a fruit tree, there are better times to prune for fruit and better times to prune for growth. I can't remember which is when, though! :doh: The idea is that when you prune, you shock the tree, and then it puts its energy into either producing fruit OR growing more.

I think culling the fruit, as Chrisky suggests, makes sense. That way you get more larger better peaches, in theory anyway.

Not sure if the sugar content goes down when a peach gets overripe, but they do start getting mealy and going bad from the center out when they're overripe. They do taste bland then, too, come to think of it.
 

wackymother

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I forgot to say that even bland peaches are good if you slice them up and stew them with sugar and a bit of liqueur--maybe peach liqueur or orange liqueur. The liqueur is optional, but what the heck. :whoopie:
 

Rose Pink

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Not sure if the sugar content goes down when a peach gets overripe, but they do start getting mealy and going bad from the center out when they're overripe. They do taste bland then, too, come to think of it.
That describes it. I ate the last two this morning and they were mealy. I shall pick and eat them earlier next year. I love peaches.
 

Rose Pink

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Thanks, everyone, for your comments and suggestions. I appreciate it.
 
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