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Just WOW: United Airlines Boeing 777 with 231 passengers makes emergency landing in Denver [MERGED]

x3 skier

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I assumed that airlines would use the same logic as we would when driving cross country. We take the newer Toyota rather than our 2005 Buick- which is in good condition but more likely to have an issue. Silly me.
I did see a line in an article from Loyalty Lobby that I liked referring to the replacement plane United used- “Again one of the oldest planes in UA’s fleet. One has to admire the guts of United’s flight planners.”

With proper maintenance and inspections, an aircraft and engines could stay in service safely indefinitely. What causes them to be retired is it becomes uneconomical to continue to make more extensive repairs and more efficient designs becoming available. There are DC-3’s flying today built in the 1940’s. In fact, I own and fly a plane built in 1946 and it will likely outlast me:cool:. If I wanted a new one that offered not much more, it would have cost me about 10 times as much.

Cheers
 
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DrQ

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I assumed that airlines would use the same logic as we would when driving cross country. We take the newer Toyota rather than our 2005 Buick- which is in good condition but more likely to have an issue. Silly me.
I would take the 2005 Buick if it were maintained like an aircraft of a top tier domestic carrier.
 

MULTIZ321

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BLUEWATER BY SPINNAKER HHI
ROYAL HOLIDAY CLUB RHC (POINTS)

pedro47

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What is the life span of a commercial jet plane engine and how often are the jet engines inspected for blade damage, metal fatigue and stress?
 

bogey21

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I remember when the Elactras were crashing in the early 50s. My recollection is that what they did to stop the crashes was slow them down...

George
 

DrQ

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What is the life span of a commercial jet plane engine and how often are the jet engines inspected for blade damage, metal fatigue and stress?
It is based on hours of use. Unless they see a problem with a particular type of engine like they just did with the P&W, then they will have emergency inspections.

Same thing with the airframe.
 

x3 skier

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What is the life span of a commercial jet plane engine and how often are the jet engines inspected for blade damage, metal fatigue and stress?
The life could be forever given proper maintenance. Life limited parts are monitored continuously by onboard systems.

The inspections are triggered by the number of cycles, time at high temperature, total hours, vibrations, oil sampling and many other factors. The specific intervals are a function of the design and outlined in maintenance manuals approved by the FAA at the time of certification and revised as service experience indicates.

I’m not specifically familiar with the PWA 4000 series but fan blades are checked visually daily for any nicks or other damage and probably before every flight. It one of the things the Pilot or First Officer does when he/she does the walk around before flight. More detailed inspection using eddycurrent or unlrasonic probes for non visible damage are done when the plane is in for maintenance and sometimes in the field if required. I believe that’s what’s going to be required now for the PWA 4000 Engines.

Cheers
 
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