• The TUGBBS forums are completely free and open to the public and exist as the absolute best place for owners to get help and advice about their timeshares for more than 26 years!

    Join tens of thousands of other owners just like you here to get any and all Timeshare questions answered!
  • TUG started 27 years ago in October 1993 as a group of regular Timeshare owners just like you!

    Check out our happy birthday post here: Happy Birthday TUG!
  • TUG has now saved timeshare owners more than $15,000,000 dollars just by finding us in time to rescind a new Timeshare purchase! A truly incredible milestone!

    Read more here: TUG saves owners more than $14 Million dollars
  • Follow the TUG Member Banner as it travels the world on vacation with Timeshare owners! Also sign up to get the banner sent to you so you can submit a photo of your vacation with the banner to share with TUG! Banner Thread
  • Sign up to get the TUG Newsletter for free! Join tens of thousands of other owners who get this every week! Latest resort reviews and the most important topics discussed by owners during the week!
  • Our official "end my sales presentation early" T-shirts are available again! Also come with the option for a free membership extension with purchase to offset the cost!

    Read more Here
  • A few of the most common links here on the forums for newbies and guests!

Hilton Grand Vacations to cut ~1,600 jobs in pandemic response

GT75

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
Moderator
Joined
May 30, 2016
Messages
2,078
Reaction score
950
Points
423
Location
Gig City in Tennessee
Resorts Owned
HGVC-x7
HGV to cut ~1,600 jobs in pandemic response - Link
 

lds337

TUG Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2012
Messages
86
Reaction score
51
Points
129
Location
Illinois
Resorts Owned
HGVC Kings Land, HGVC Ocean 22, HGVC Sunrise Lodge, Sheraton Desert Oasis, Westin Kierland, and Wyndham Glacier Canyon
HGV to cut ~1,600 jobs in pandemic response - Link
Unfortunately this maybe just the beginning of much larger changes


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

Tamaradarann

TUG Review Crew: Expert
TUG Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2006
Messages
2,361
Reaction score
652
Points
323
Location
Long Island, New York
Resorts Owned
HGVC South Beach, HGVC Las Vegas, HGVC Las Vegas on the Strip, HGVC Sea World, Misner Place
QUOTE="GT75, post: 2518833, member: 87063"]
HGV to cut ~1,600 jobs in pandemic response - Link
[/QUOTE]

We have some friends who work at the Hilton Hawaiian Village who have been subjected to the layoffs. When the Village was closed back in April the workers were furloughed. (I am not sure I know the real difference between the two.). Now some of those workers have been officially job cut and others have been told they will be reporting to work on a certain date. From my understanding both groups of people are really not happy. The former because they are unemployed, and the latter because they fear getting the virus from going to work.
 

MPrince

TUG Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2020
Messages
29
Reaction score
21
Points
53
Resorts Owned
HGVC The District by Hilton Gold, HGVC Oceans 22 Platinum, Elara Gold, Elara Platinum, Flamingo Gold
Furloughs are temporary, and usually for a specified period of time. Layoffs can also be temporary, but often (and are more likely to be) permanent.
 

dioxide45

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
May 20, 2006
Messages
30,291
Reaction score
4,404
Points
699
Location
NE Florida
Resorts Owned
Marriott's Grande Vista
Marriott's Harbour Lake
SVV - Bella
SVV - Key West
Furloughs are temporary, and usually for a specified period of time. Layoffs can also be temporary, but often (and are more likely to be) permanent.
Usually layoffs will require the employee to be rehired. They don't have to rehire the same employees. With a furlough they will often retain benefits during their furlough, but with a layoff, benefits are cut off at a certain point and they would get severance if eligible.
 

dgalati

TUG Member
Joined
Jul 16, 2015
Messages
2,274
Reaction score
917
Points
223
As COVID cases spike this fall more layoffs and resort closures are a real possibility. Most hospitality companies are hurting from the closures earlier this year along with the low occupancy rates mandated on reopenings.
 

brp

TUG Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2007
Messages
2,221
Reaction score
815
Points
323
Location
Bay Area, CA
As COVID cases spike this fall more layoffs and resort closures are a real possibility. Most hospitality companies are hurting from the closures earlier this year along with the low occupancy rates mandated on reopenings.
I don't want to digress into a COVID discussion thread, but one thing I saw today in the NY Times daily blog is germane to this point. The story mentioned that while we are seeing an increases in cases lately, much of this is likely attributable to higher testing rates as justified by reduced hospitalizations and steady to declining death rates. In the end, this could mean that real cases are not increasing and the impact on HGVC (and travel, in general) may not be as pronounced.

Again, not trying to start a debate on this, just adding a counterpoint that I happened to read today.

We can hope.

Cheers.
 

klpca

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2006
Messages
6,237
Reaction score
4,281
Points
499
Location
CA
Resorts Owned
SDO, Quarter House, Seapointe, Coronado Beach, HGVC Bay Club, Carlsbad Inn
We have some friends who work at the Hilton Hawaiian Village who have been subjected to the layoffs. When the Village was closed back in April the workers were furloughed. (I am not sure I know the real difference between the two.). Now some of those workers have been officially job cut and others have been told they will be reporting to work on a certain date. From my understanding both groups of people are really not happy. The former because they are unemployed, and the latter because they fear getting the virus from going to work.
Plus they will probably be doing their job and their former co-workers job for the same pay.

My daughter worked in high end retail sales (she starts her new job today!). Her former company cut staffing to the bone so that they didn't even have enough staff to cover bathroom breaks during the day, much less cover for people to take time off for doctor's appointments or vacations. They also cut way back on merchandise because of cash flow issues, yet expected staff to maintain their sales numbers. So unrealistic. But that's how it's being done because there are a lot of companies (and states I suppose) that have blown through their rainy-day funds and are just out of cash.

We are in a sorry state financially. Buckle up.
 

dayooper

TUG Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2018
Messages
1,736
Reaction score
1,278
Points
224
Location
The Land of Ice and Snow
Resorts Owned
HGVC at The Flamingo
I don't want to digress into a COVID discussion thread, but one thing I saw today in the NY Times daily blog is germane to this point. The story mentioned that while we are seeing an increases in cases lately, much of this is likely attributable to higher testing rates as justified by reduced hospitalizations and steady to declining death rates. In the end, this could mean that real cases are not increasing and the impact on HGVC (and travel, in general) may not be as pronounced.

Again, not trying to start a debate on this, just adding a counterpoint that I happened to read today.

We can hope.

Cheers.
The positivity rate is one of the stats that public health officials use to determine whether to suggest opening up more or bring in more regulations. It’s the ratio of how many people are testing positive. Right now NYC has a 7 day rolling average of a 1.3% positivity rate. You want the number below 5% to open up and NYC’s is very good. Here in Michigan, we are up to a 4.3% rate and climbing.

FYI - The highest rate is Nevada with a 46% positivity rate.

I originally had Iowa as the highest with 49.9%, but the data is actually 20.9% making Nevada with the highest rate.

Other HGVC states:

Utah: 15.1%
Florida: 12%
S. Carolina: 5.8%
Illinois: 5.5%
Colorado: 5.3%
Hawaii: 2.5%
California: 2.4%
Washington DC: 1.2%

Edit - The site I got my data from transcribed Iowa's data from John's Hopkins University wrong. They are at 20.9% instead of 49.9%. I have changed the data above to reflect that error.
 
Last edited:

dioxide45

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
May 20, 2006
Messages
30,291
Reaction score
4,404
Points
699
Location
NE Florida
Resorts Owned
Marriott's Grande Vista
Marriott's Harbour Lake
SVV - Bella
SVV - Key West
The positivity rate is one of the stats that public health officials use to determine whether to suggest opening up more or bring in more regulations. It’s the ratio of how many people are testing positive. Right now NYC has a 7 day rolling average of a 1.3% positivity rate. You want the number below 5% to open up and NYC’s is very good. Here in Michigan, we are up to a 4.3% rate and climbing.

FYI - The highest rate is Iowa with a 49.9% positivity with Nevada close behind with a 46% rate.

Other HGVC states:

Utah: 15.1%
Florida: 12%
S. Carolina: 5.8%
Illinois: 5.5%
Colorado: 5.3%
Hawaii: 2.5%
California: 2.4%
Washington DC: 1.2%
Positivity rate seems like an odd metric to use since you really don't control how many are tested and most often one would only get tested if they think they are sick. Wouldn't a better metric to use be new cases per 1000 population or something like that?
 

ljmiii

TUG Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2008
Messages
1,055
Reaction score
426
Points
293
Location
NY, NY
Positivity rate seems like an odd metric to use since you really don't control how many are tested and most often one would only get tested if they think they are sick. Wouldn't a better metric to use be new cases per 1000 population or something like that?
Public health officials look at a number of different metrics - but new cases per 100K people and % positive are the most common. Percent positive per test gives you a good view into how widespread the disease is...but as you say it sometimes says more about a state's interest in testing than it does COVID.

Meanwhile, in the US tests are up, cases are up, hospitalizations have unfortunately started to climb since late September, and deaths have thus far remained steady. But these nationwide numbers mask a wide discrepancy between each state.

US covid 10 20.jpg
 

dayooper

TUG Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2018
Messages
1,736
Reaction score
1,278
Points
224
Location
The Land of Ice and Snow
Resorts Owned
HGVC at The Flamingo
Positivity rate seems like an odd metric to use since you really don't control how many are tested and most often one would only get tested if they think they are sick. Wouldn't a better metric to use be new cases per 1000 population or something like that?
@ljmiii is correct in that there are many statistics health officials use.

One of the reasons they use positivity rate is that it shows how much testing is going on. Communities that have a higher positivity rate usually aren't testing as much. Most health officials believe the more testing that is done, the safer the community is. When communities aren't testing as much, people are slipping through the cracks who are sick. I know it sounds strange, but that's how it was explained to me by a friend of mine that's in the know.

Think of it this way, if someone thinks they may have been exposed or are experiencing slight symptoms and they get tested, they know much earlier than if they waited until the symptoms were stronger. It's why I had myself tested a few weeks ago. I was experiencing slight symptoms and was exposed to someone that was positive. I had both the rapid and lab tests done and was negative. If I was positive, I would have been quarantined during the time when I would have been most infectious. The more testing we do, the quicker people know they are sick and can quarantine themselves stopping the spread from their end. In this case knowledge is power.
 
Last edited:

Talent312

Tug Review Crew: Rookie
TUG Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2007
Messages
14,027
Reaction score
3,937
Points
548
Resorts Owned
HGVC & GTS
Back to the topic at hand:
Typically, when a business cuts staffing, they expect remaining worker-bees to: (1) Feel grateful that they still have a job, and (2) double up on to cover the missing co-worker. For consumers, it may slow customer response times, such as maintenance calls, IT fixes to website issues and customer service at the call center.

.
 
Last edited:

hurnik

TUG Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2006
Messages
1,410
Reaction score
345
Points
293
Location
Albany, NY
Unfortunately I'd say this is to be expected in the accommodation business (hotels, timeshares, etc.) given mandated occupancy levels and/or entire shutdowns for months. I feel bad for everyone affected by this, and it sucks for everyone. Hopefully things will improve sooner rather than later.
 
Top