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FAA: More Than 45,000 Drones Have Been Registered in Just 2 Days

MULTIZ321

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FAA: More Than 45,000 Drones Have Been Registered in Just 2 Days - by Raymond Wong/ Tech/ Mashable/ mashable.com

"Damn, are there are a lot of people flying drones in the United States.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) reports that more than 45,000 drones have been registered since the Federal Drone Registration website went live on Monday.

There are so many registrations, in fact, that the FAA is planningf to take the website offline on Wednesday at 9 p.m. ET for maintenance in order to prepare for the influx of incoming drone registrations; the administration is anticipating 400,000 drones could be sold this holiday season. The drone registration will return online on Thursday at 6 a.m. ET, following the nine-hour maintenance.

On Dec. 14, the FAA announced all drones weighing between 0.55 and 55 pounds — including cameras and other payloads — would need to be registered before they could be legally flown in the sky.

Drones purchased after Dec. 21 must be registered before they are flown for the first time. People who purchased drones prior to then have until Feb. 19, 2016, to register, letting the FAA "trace the ownership of an aircraft in the event of an incident," according to its website..."

AP_100803687953.jpg

Image: Andrew Matthews/Associated Press


Richard
 

MULTIZ321

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This Drone Can Fly Through the Air and Under Water - by Matthew Hussey/ Shareables/ TNW News/ thenextweb.com

"While drones have been getting a bad rap for dropping from the skies at inopportune moments recently, a new drone from Rutgers University can swim as well as fly.

Funded by a grant from the Office of Naval Research, the Naviator can be deployed for either aerial reconnaissance or for snooping underwater.

“They have submarines that can launch things from the submarine and it pops out into the water and goes and does some things, but it can’t come back,” explains Marco Maia, a Rutgers doctoral student who worked on the project.

“It does one mission and one mission only. Then you have airplanes that deploy vehicles from the air that can dive into the water, from then on they’re in the water and cannot come back out. This vehicle does all those things.”

The Office of Naval Research has taken a keen interest in the project as it can help with the maintenance of ships, explains associate professor Javier Diez..."

Richard
 

dioxide45

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I believe that this rule also covers model aircraft. My father has flown radio controlled model airplanes since the early 1990s. More of a hobby, no cameras, nothing fancy. He lives in Canada, so I don't know if they have similar requirements now with drones becoming so popular.

I really wonder how well the new system will work. Is it just another big waste of time and money? So what if someone has a drone registered? There could be a near encounter that will again result in nothing because if they can't identify who owns the drone when it is flying it is of no help. SUre if it brings down a plane and the drone also crashes, then great. But unless they can find the drone that was the culprit, I think the whole thing is a waste of time.

Perhaps if someone is complaining of a drone flying through their neighborhood spying on people, they may be able to catch the perpetrator. If they can bring down the drone.
 

am1

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As far as drones go I think that cameras should not be allowed within so many feet above the land.
 

SMHarman

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As far as drones go I think that cameras should not be allowed within so many feet above the land.
Not possible or practical.

1. How do you launch.
2. Just fit a long lens.
 

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I believe that this rule also covers model aircraft. My father has flown radio controlled model airplanes since the early 1990s. More of a hobby, no cameras, nothing fancy. He lives in Canada, so I don't know if they have similar requirements now with drones becoming so popular.

I really wonder how well the new system will work. Is it just another big waste of time and money? So what if someone has a drone registered? There could be a near encounter that will again result in nothing because if they can't identify who owns the drone when it is flying it is of no help. SUre if it brings down a plane and the drone also crashes, then great. But unless they can find the drone that was the culprit, I think the whole thing is a waste of time.

Perhaps if someone is complaining of a drone flying through their neighborhood spying on people, they may be able to catch the perpetrator. If they can bring down the drone.

This entire thing is asinine. Can someone please direct me to FAA's explanation of what a "drone" even is? How many props?

That is, must people with R/C helicopters also register their craft? What about R/C airplanes? Do they need to register? If not, why not?

As someone that actually flies these R/C multicopters, as I prefer to call them, I ask: if someone is a goon that intends to do stupid things with them, as with any other tool/hobby/sport/ etc. on the planet, do you think they intend to register their craft? Really???

Legislators that come up with this crap are good at one thing only: taking your money. It's $5 per registration folks. Where's the money going?

Some monkey actually had the brainless thought to suggest "you could do bad things with these drones like load it with explosives...." Really? Hmm, seems to me a evil person could do the same thing with a car. And then there's those evil box cutters.

I have no intention of registering mine, and, I intend to continue flying in a respectful manner. Period.
 

Phydeaux

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As far as drones go I think that cameras should not be allowed within so many feet above the land.

Would you like to explain why? For your privacy?

Have you ever stepped outside and gone for a walk? Have you ever been to a gas station? Grocery store? Bank? Market? Street corner? You know, places outside of the interior of your home.

Do you have any idea how many times your photo is captured daily, without your knowledge, and without your permission?

Yes, there's jerks that invade peoples privacy with multicopters. There's also jerks that invade privacy or conduct other non sensible, irritating, unlawful, criminal acts with nothing but their knuckle dragging selves.
 

dioxide45

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This entire thing is asinine. Can someone please direct me to FAA's explanation of what a "drone" even is? How many props?

That is, must people with R/C helicopters also register their craft? What about R/C airplanes? Do they need to register? If not, why not?

As someone that actually flies these R/C multicopters, as I prefer to call them, I ask: if someone is a goon that intends to do stupid things with them, as with any other tool/hobby/sport/ etc. on the planet, do you think they intend to register their craft? Really???

Legislators that come up with this crap are good at one thing only: taking your money. It's $5 per registration folks. Where's the money going?

Some monkey actually had the brainless thought to suggest "you could do bad things with these drones like load it with explosives...." Really? Hmm, seems to me a evil person could do the same thing with a car. And then there's those evil box cutters.

I have no intention of registering mine, and, I intend to continue flying in a respectful manner. Period.

It looks like the AMA is suggesting to its members to hold off on registering their model aircraft. Though they suggest (as they always have) that its members put their name, address, and AMA number on or in their aircraft.

http://amablog.modelaircraft.org/amagov/2015/12/17/hold-off-on-registering-model-aircraft/

Another note, currently drone registration is free until January 20th. Registration is also only valid for three years, so you have to re-register and pay the $5 fee every five years.

I agree that this new registration is ineffective. They could have required registration at time of purchase with each aircraft requiring a unique serial number. Though registration will also produce a unique number that you place on the aircraft.

Though just like any registration, people who want to do bad things will find ways around it. I think this is more of a deterrent for people that are hobbyists flying aircraft near airports where there have been a number of near misses. People flying their model aircraft take great pride in what they created and don't want to see that whiped out. Someone who dropped $100 on a pre-made drone probably are not as careful.
 

pedro47

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I believe that this rule also covers model aircraft. My father has flown radio controlled model airplanes since the early 1990s. More of a hobby, no cameras, nothing fancy. He lives in Canada, so I don't know if they have similar requirements now with drones becoming so popular.

I really wonder how well the new system will work. Is it just another big waste of time and money? So what if someone has a drone registered? There could be a near encounter that will again result in nothing because if they can't identify who owns the drone when it is flying it is of no help. SUre if it brings down a plane and the drone also crashes, then great. But unless they can find the drone that was the culprit, I think the whole thing is a waste of time.

Perhaps if someone is complaining of a drone flying through their neighborhood spying on people, they may be able to catch the perpetrator. If they can bring down the drone.

What will happen if a person purchase and failed to register it? There have been a drone spotted/flying in our area and we are 1/2 mile from a police station and fire station. However, no action have been taken against the person flying that drone. Plus we are near a major military installation .
 

am1

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Land above your private property. A few hundred feet above should be restricted. A long lens would defeat this but let them work for it a bit.

You may think differently if someone starts flying a done outside your bedroom window.

Would you like to explain why? For your privacy?

Have you ever stepped outside and gone for a walk? Have you ever been to a gas station? Grocery store? Bank? Market? Street corner? You know, places outside of the interior of your home.

Do you have any idea how many times your photo is captured daily, without your knowledge, and without your permission?

Yes, there's jerks that invade peoples privacy with multicopters. There's also jerks that invade privacy or conduct other non sensible, irritating, unlawful, criminal acts with nothing but their knuckle dragging selves.
 

Phydeaux

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What will happen if a person purchase and failed to register it? There have been a drone spotted/flying in our area and we are 1/2 mile from a police station and fire station. However, no action have been taken against the person flying that drone. Plus we are near a major military installation .

I'm aware of the 5 mile airspace restriction from airports, but not aware of a police or fire station airspace restriction. Could you post the applicable FAA link please?

Also, "near" is a relative term. What is the distance in miles or km drones are flying from this major military installation? Me thinks if the military is interested in putting a stop to it, they will.
 
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Phydeaux

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Land above your private property. A few hundred feet above should be restricted. A long lens would defeat this but let them work for it a bit.

You may think differently if someone starts flying a done outside your bedroom window.

Have you or anyone you know personally, had a multi copter flying outside your bedroom window?

If someone begins flying outside my window, *I* will deal with it. I don't need someone else to restrict the entire population from something that I am fully capable of handling on my own, thanks anyhow.
 
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SMHarman

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What will happen if a person purchase and failed to register it? There have been a drone spotted/flying in our area and we are 1/2 mile from a police station and fire station. However, no action have been taken against the person flying that drone. Plus we are near a major military installation .
You could not launch one in 25 miles of NYC without being 1/2 mile from a police or ambulance or fire station!
Land above your private property. A few hundred feet above should be restricted. A long lens would defeat this but let them work for it a bit.

You may think differently if someone starts flying a done outside your bedroom window.
These things have. 1000 ft ceiling. So now you are proposing a floor over every home.

Perhaps owners should file flight plans also!

There are other laws already on the books to prevent someone sticking a camera up against your window. By then it's sufficient on your property that you can shoot it down or otherwise disable it.

Why in the space of a year or two the US can force a federal drone registry but not have a Federal gun registration system baffles me.
 
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am1

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Then go at it from another angle. If a drone is over your property below a certain height you are free to knock it down.

You could not launch one in 25 miles of NYC without being 1/2 mile from a police or ambulance or fire station!

These things have. 1000 ft ceiling. So now you are proposing a floor over every home.

Perhaps owners should file flight plans also!

There are other laws already on the books to prevent someone sticking a camera up against your window. By then it's sufficient on your property that you can shoot it down or otherwise disable it.

Why in the space of a year or two the US can force a federal drone registry but not have a Federal gun registration system baffles me.
 

MULTIZ321

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What the New FAA Restrictions Have to Say About Your Drone - by Kelsey D. Atherton/ Aviation/ Popular Science/ popsci.com

"You can fly anything under 55 pounds, but prepare to register.

Earlier today, the FAA announced its rules for drone registration. Any drone weighing more than 250 grams, which is roughly half a pound or about two sticks of butter, has to be registered by February 16th, 2016, or the drone’s owner could face thousands of dollars in fines.

But if you already have a drone, just bought one for your niece for Christmas, or are thinking about getting one, here's a simple guide to see if yours meets the weight limit. It's by no means comprehensive, but should give you a rough idea of what types of drones people will have to register.

There's one important point before beginning, and that's about usage..."

Richard
 

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Then go at it from another angle. If a drone is over your property below a certain height you are free to knock it down.
I don't know but I'm sure a libertarian will soon be testing that in a US court.
 

x3 skier

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As a pilot, I'm scared s****** some moron will being flying these near airports. Having seen what birds that weigh much less than the drone weight limit have done to windshields and props and having tested aircraft engines against similar weight birds, the potential damage can be catastrophic. :mad:

Registration won't stop these nutters but if I'm killed or injured by a registered drone, my heirs might have an easier time sending them to jail. Of course this assumes some clown who ignores the already existing rules will register, a highly dubious assumption but hopefully they can be tracked via serial number.

Cheers
 
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dioxide45

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As I pilot, I'm scared s****** some moron will being flying these near airports. Having seen what birds that weigh much less than the drone weight limit have done to windshields and props and having tested aircraft engines against similar weight birds, the potential damage can be catastrophic. :mad:

Registration won't stop these nutters but if I'm killed or injured by a registered drone, my heirs might have an easier time sending them to jail. Of course this assumes some clown who ignores the already existing rules will register, a highly dubious assumption but hopefully they can be tracked via serial number.

Cheers

They can only be tracked by serial number if the owner registers their drone. You can register the drone using the serial number of the drone. It may be possible to narrow down where a drone was sold based on serial number, but unless they start taking registrations at time of purchase, knowing who owns the drone might be difficult. Unless the owner sent in a warranty registration after buying their drone.
 

x3 skier

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They can only be tracked by serial number if the owner registers their drone. You can register the drone using the serial number of the drone. It may be possible to narrow down where a drone was sold based on serial number, but unless they start taking registrations at time of purchase, knowing who owns the drone might be difficult. Unless the owner sent in a warranty registration after buying their drone.

Agree but barcoding readers or Credit Card records of the sale might help. It should be easier than tracking laser pointers that some halfwits are pointed at cockpits at night. As I don't do night flying, that hazard is not as worrying as a drone collision. :cool:

Cheers
 

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F.A.A. Drone Laws Start to Clash With Stricter Local Rules - by Cecilia Kang/ Technology/ International New York Times/ The New York Times/ nytimes.com

"MIAMI — Frank Carollo, a longtime member of the City Council here, had worked for several weeks fine-tuning a proposal to limit the use of recreational drones, the increasingly popular remote-controlled flying devices. Minutes before the start of the vote on the rules this month, lawyers from the Federal Aviation Administration called him.

The lawyers said the Miami ordinance needed to make clear that the federal agency had ultimate control over airspace. Not wanting to delay the vote, Mr. Carollo complied, deleting requirements about permitting that would have duplicated those by the F.A.A., before getting the new law approved unanimously by the City Council.

“People we had not spoken to at the F.A.A. and at companies suddenly called for amendments,” Mr. Carollo said after the vote. “But there had been a void on public safety and the use of drones. We understand the F.A.A. regulates drones, but the F.A.A. doesn’t have bodies on the ground to enforce their rules. That is why I believed Miami had to have its own rules.”..."


28dronelaw-web1-master675.jpg

Steven Brajdic flying a drone at Drones Plus in Miami. Credit Ryan Stone for The New York Times


Richard
 

vacationhopeful

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Or do as an acquaintance of mine did 6 months ago .. he simply brought his drone with cash. Did NOT like the idea of the government requiring him to license his toy ....
 

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Or do as an acquaintance of mine did 6 months ago .. he simply brought his drone with cash. Did NOT like the idea of the government requiring him to license his toy ....

I do NOT like the idea of 'toys' bringing down aircraft, either.
 

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I have set up my own anti-aircraft battery in the backyard.

Drones had better mind their flight paths.
 

MULTIZ321

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Woman Allegedly Persuades Neighbor to Shoot Down Legal Drone - by Chris Matyszczyk/ Tech Culture/ C/net/ cnet.com

Technically Incorrect: In Oklahoma, a construction company is using a drone to inspect a property. A neighbor allegedly doesn't like that. (echnically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives.)

Now that drones have to be registered with the Federal Aviation Administration, everything's going to be fine, isn't it?

Ordinary people will look up to the sky and mutter, "Ah, yes. There flies a registered drone."

Or perhaps they'll still look up, fear that the drone is spying and shoot the darned thing down.

This is what allegedly occurred in Edmond, Oklahoma, on Wednesday.

"What we've been able to gather: The drone is registered with the FAA and was being used to survey a home for a construction project," Mark Opgrande, a spokesman for the Oklahoma County Sheriff's Office, told me.

He said a woman saw the drone and "thought some kids might be using it to spy on the neighbors." Kids, they're natural spies these days. Gadgets have made them that way.

The woman allegedly alerted another neighbor, who pulled out his gun and shot the drone down. There had been some issues with teens flying drones in the neighborhood in the past, Opgrande told me.

An investigation is ongoing, but the alleged shooter and the drone owner have, Opgrande told me, come to "a mutual understanding and worked out arrangements to repair the drone."

This isn't the first time a drone has been shot out of the sky by someone who suspects nefarious intent...."

Richard
 

dioxide45

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I would be interested to know if the number of aircraft and drone probems reported by commercial aircraft pilots have actually dropped with this new registration requirement?
 
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