• The TUGBBS forums are completely free and open to the public and exist as the absolute best place for owners to get help and advice about their timeshares for more than 30 years!

    Join Tens of Thousands of other Owners just like you here to get any and all Timeshare questions answered 24 hours a day!
  • TUG started 30 years ago in October 1993 as a group of regular Timeshare owners just like you!

    Read about our 30th anniversary: Happy 30th Birthday TUG!
  • TUG has a YouTube Channel to produce weekly short informative videos on popular Timeshare topics!

    Free memberships for every 50 subscribers!

    Visit TUG on Youtube!
  • TUG has now saved timeshare owners more than $21,000,000 dollars just by finding us in time to rescind a new Timeshare purchase! A truly incredible milestone!

    Read more here: TUG saves owners more than $21 Million dollars
  • Sign up to get the TUG Newsletter for free!

    60,000+ subscribing owners! A weekly recap of the best Timeshare resort reviews and the most popular topics discussed by owners!
  • Our official "end my sales presentation early" T-shirts are available again! Also come with the option for a free membership extension with purchase to offset the cost!

    All T-shirt options here!
  • A few of the most common links here on the forums for newbies and guests!

Easy Dessert Suggestions??

Pat H

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
3,469
Reaction score
67
Points
433
Location
Sun City Hilton Head
Resorts Owned
Brigantine
I'm making a pumpkin walnut pie for Thanksgiving but want to add another dessert. Needs to be easy, don't want to peel anything, prefer something with chocolate in it and without a lot of expensive ingredients. Ideas?
 

Kay H

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
1,649
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Location
South Jersey
How about Death by Chocolate?

1 box brownie mix
3 pkg (3.5 0z) instant choc mousse
8 choc-covered toffee candy bars (I like Heath bars)
1 container (12 0z) frozen whipped topping


Bake brownies; let cool. Prepare mousse according to directions. Break candy bars into small peices in food processor (or a hammer) Break up half the brownies into small pieces and place in bottom of glass bowl (sse thru) or trifle dish. Cover with half the mousse, then half the candy, then half whipped topping. Repeat layers with remaining ingredients. Refrigerate when done.


The hardest part is breaking the candy but you could probably substitute another kind. I'd probably try Reeses peanutbutter cups.
 

Carolyn

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
1,236
Reaction score
9
Points
399
Location
Carmel, Indiana
Resorts Owned
Westin St John
WJL St Lucia
St James Club Antigua
Charter Club Marco
Sheraton Desert Oasis
I have been able to buy the crushed Heath bars where you would find chocolate chips in the grocery store. Great dessert!
 

pjrose

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2005
Messages
8,739
Reaction score
15
Points
473
Location
Central PA USA
How about Death by Chocolate?

1 box brownie mix
3 pkg (3.5 0z) instant choc mousse
8 choc-covered toffee candy bars (I like Heath bars)
1 container (12 0z) frozen whipped topping


Bake brownies; let cool. Prepare mousse according to directions. Break candy bars into small peices in food processor (or a hammer) Break up half the brownies into small pieces and place in bottom of glass bowl (sse thru) or trifle dish. Cover with half the mousse, then half the candy, then half whipped topping. Repeat layers with remaining ingredients. Refrigerate when done.


The hardest part is breaking the candy but you could probably substitute another kind. I'd probably try Reeses peanutbutter cups.

Oooohhhhh that sounds good.

My variation:

Double all ingredients (you'll see why)

mix brownies; as you pour the batter into the pan, leave about 1/3 of batter in bowl to scrape out and eat before washing the bowl. Bake the rest.

Break up brownies, eating every 3rd or 4th chunk.

Make mousse, following the same general principle - leave a lot in the bowl to eat as you clean the bowl with a rubber spatula.

Break up heath bars, again eating assorted chunks here and there.

Layer what's left, eating a few morsels as desired if you're capable.

go take a long nap from your chocolate stupor.
:zzz: :zzz: :zzz:
 
Last edited:

dmharris

TUG Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2006
Messages
2,099
Reaction score
87
Points
408
Location
Butler, PA
Mrs. B's Brownie-Cookie "Cake"

1 package Ghiradelli triple chocolate brownie mix
1 package triple chunk chocolate chip cookies in the refrigerated section; the kind you pull apart, they come in a rectangle. I use Nestle's.

I always double this but the single version fits in an 8x8 pan. The doubled version in a 9x13 pan.

Spray or grease pan as you typically do. Make the brownie mix and bake in the pan for the allotted minutes MINUS the amount of minutes the cookies take to bake. Take out of the oven, put the pieces of refrigerated cookie dough to cover the top, leaving a little space between each as the dough spreads. Put it back in the oven and bake for the remainder of the time. It's done when the cookie topping looks done to your satisfaction. (some people like very done cookies)

Timing example: If the brownie mix takes 40 minutes and the cookies take 15 minutes, bake the brownies for 25 minutes, take them out, add the cookie dough and bake for 15 more minutes. Easy Peasey!

I would make this for my older daughter's birthday as she doesn't like cake. I took it to her college dorm as her birthday is Dec. 17 right before Christmas break when I'd pick her up to come home and all her dorm mates would flock to her room for Mrs. B's Brownie-Cookie "Cake". It's sometimes gooey in the center, which girls generally adore!
 

heathpack

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
4,659
Reaction score
3,763
Points
598
Location
Los Angeles
Resorts Owned
Hyatt High Sierra and Highland Inn
Disney’s Grand Californian and Hilton Head Island
Marriott Barony Beach and Mountainside
MVC Points
Sheraton Broadway Plantation
Sometimes for dessert I take a Blue Diamond Roasted Salted Almond (plain, not smokehouse) and push it into a dried apricot through the opening from which the pit was extracted. Repeat several times and you have a nice plateful of little confections. I have often wondered how these would be half-dipped in dark chocolate. Maybe you could make some up for Thanksgiving and let me know?

The simplest dessert you could do would be a box of good chocolates and a bowful of nuts. Along similar lines would be dried dates, blue cheese, honey and roasted almonds. Fresh figs are a good substitute for the dates but most places would be hard to find and expensive.

You could serve bowls of chocolate ice cream topped with frangelico or Kahula, chopped nuts, and fresh whipped cream. Hershey's syrup for the kids. If your local bakery sells meringue shells they make a festive presentation. Or you could do peppermint ice cream topped with hot fudge sauce and marshmallow creme or whipped cream.

If you don't mind cooking but just don't want to mess with another dish on Thanksgiving Day, you could make chocolate mousse the day prior, it would keep perfectly.

You could also buy a box of those thin Nabisco chocolate wafers and serve them with strawberries or raspberries and whipped cream.

But I hope you make the apricot, almond, chocolate bites!

H
 

pjrose

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2005
Messages
8,739
Reaction score
15
Points
473
Location
Central PA USA
Heathpack's suggestion could be good with the Emerald Cocoa Roast almonds.
 

mecllap

Tug Review Crew: Rookie
TUG Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2006
Messages
462
Reaction score
0
Points
16
Location
North Carolina
A box or two of Nabisco or Anna's chocolate wafers. Whip up a pint of whipping cream, add a little sugar and vanilla. Layer in a dish (or form into a log shape) the cookies and whipped cream. Refrigerate overnight (or several hours). Totally yummy. (Can decorate with marachinos cherries, etc.).
 

RonB

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
937
Reaction score
156
Points
403
Check here. The chocolate cookies pictured could easily be made ahead of time, and are great made with peanut butter chips. There are a ton of recipes on this site if the cookies do not suite.

Ron
 

Fern Modena

TUG Lifetime Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2004
Messages
4,660
Reaction score
4
Points
36
Location
Southern Nevada
Heathpack reminded me of something my mother used to do for the holidays. That was back when "Mission Pack" who had dried fruit packs was all over town for the holidays. We weren't rich enough for any of that stuff, so my mom replicated it at home.

She'd buy pitted dates, candied fruit (just cherries if you feel ok chopping them, otherwise a mix is ok), and walnuts.

She'd slit open the dates and fill the slit where the pit was with either a walnut half or a few pieces of candied fruit. Once they were done she'd dredge them in powdered sugar. Yummy. Only if you make them, don't wear anything dark. :) Powdered sugar can be a mess.


This year for my pot luck (finger food & desserts) I am making candied pretzel sticks. Easy-peasy.

Get the pretzel rods, chocolate chips, and cake decorations (like colored sugar, candied dots, etc). Dip the pretzels halfway in melted chocolate, let cool but not dry, then dip in the cake decorations. Put stand up in a glass or put on wax paper and place in the fridge for an hour to harden, and they are good to go.

Either of these items can be made ahead, no problem.

Fern
Fern
 

Quiet Pine

TUG Review Crew: Expert
TUG Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2011
Messages
652
Reaction score
637
Points
304
Location
AZ Valley of the Sun
Resorts Owned
Sheraton Desert Oasis
The easiest dessert I make:
Chocolate Mousse Pronto

1/2 cup hot water
1 tsp. instant coffee
6 oz. package chocolate chips (1 cup)
3 tsp. sugar
1/4 tsp. salt
2 Tbsp. rum
3 eggs
Put ingredients in blender, blend for 2 minutes, pour into cups, refrigerate until set, perhaps 2-4 hours. Can be served with whipped cream for topping. If you wish, soak maraschino cherries in brandy or rum and put one in the bottom of each dessert cup.
 

Pat H

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
3,469
Reaction score
67
Points
433
Location
Sun City Hilton Head
Resorts Owned
Brigantine
Wow, thanks for all the great ideas. I don't know how I'll choose just 1.

pjrose. you sure have the right idea!
 

hefleycatz

TUG Member
Joined
Sep 8, 2008
Messages
753
Reaction score
2
Points
378
Location
Wildwood MO
I always make a just a plain ole' chocolate pie. Graham cracker crust (can be store bought) couple packages of the heat and serve choc pudding, sometimes I might add a container of cool whip to the choc to beat and make more fluffy. Really simple, but sooo good. Of course, whipped cream on top.

lee

I saw a receipe the other day for a chocolate pecan pie, so I'm thinking that I will try that this year. Along with the standard Pumpkin and Chocolat pies.
 

pjrose

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2005
Messages
8,739
Reaction score
15
Points
473
Location
Central PA USA
Another idea - no work and very little money.

Do you have a farmer's market nearby? We've bought wonderful pies from the Amish or Mennonite stands, maybe $5-$6 each, shoo-fly, pumpkin, pecan, apple, peach, apple-rhubarb, to take to NYC. They've been a big hit, even in their foil-pans, 'cause we describe them as fresh from the Amish farm. Shoo-fly and Apple-crumb are especially appreciated.

PJ
 

MuranoJo

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2005
Messages
4,946
Reaction score
186
Points
448
Location
Idaho
PJ,
I've always wondered what 'shoo-fly' pies are? (And I know I should know since I think it's a Southern treat.)
 

pjrose

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2005
Messages
8,739
Reaction score
15
Points
473
Location
Central PA USA
Well, the idea is that it's so sweet that when you have them out cooling you have to keep shooing the flies away - back before window screens I guess.

It's a kind of crumbly cookie pie with a molasses bottom. There's both wet and dry shoo-fly pie - the wet has a gooier molasses bottom than the dry. I like the wet bottom best

Basically you make a bottom crust with pie pastry, then for the filling, cut together butter or shortening, flour, and brown sugar, then mix dark molasses and egg and water, then layer the molasses mixture in first, then the butter/flour/mixture mixture, and bake. The layers will bond together, with the gooiest molasses at the bottom, then a molasses/crumble mixture, then crumble on top. My father learned to cook from his PA Dutch grandmother and mother, and he made it.

There are as many recipes as there are PA Dutch cooks. Some use white sugar rather than brown, and some put the molasses on top, and it sinks down as it cooks. I don't make it, just buy it from the Amish or Mennonite stands at the farmer's markets.
 
Last edited:
Top