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Different car for retirement?

DaveNV

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I’ve always been a utility vehicle person. Pickups, Jeeps, vans, SUVs and such were my preferred vehicle, rather than passenger cars. Add in a convertible sports car now and then for fun, and I was always happy.

And then I started to see the frailty of life. After my recent second knee replacement surgery, I’ve had a fair amount of trouble getting into, out of, and driving my Jeep Wrangler. My spouse has never been comfortable riding in it. I had to go to a doctor’s appointment late afternoon the day before Thanksgiving an hour south of me, and I was caught in stop and go traffic for about five hours - it nearly killed me with stiffness, and I could barely walk when I got home. I really enjoyed having the Jeep, but other recent “life” decisions (not moving to Nevada, not buying an RV to retire in [with the Jeep towed behind it]), kind of helped me decide the Jeep needed to find a new home.

So yesterday I bought another BMW. It’s an X1, three year old lease return, still under warranty, loaded with conveniences, easy to drive, turbo engine makes it fast, and it’s a fun car to drive. Spouse loves riding in it, and it’s just “utility” enough to make me happy. With my impending retirement, I think it’ll be a great fit.

So the question is, did you (or do you plan to) get a different car for your retirement years? What did you switch out and what did you get? Curious to know if it’s just me. ;)

Dave
 
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WinniWoman

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I’ve always been a utility vehicle person. Pickups, Jeeps, vans, SUVs and such were my preferred vehicle, rather than passenger cars. Add in a convertible sports car now and then for fun, and I was always happy.

And then I started to see the frailty of life. After my recent second knee replacement surgery, I’ve had a fair amount of trouble getting into, out of, and driving my Jeep Wrangler. My spouse has never been comfortable riding in it. I had to go to a doctor’s appointment late afternoon the day before Thanksgiving an hour south of me, and I was caught in stop and go traffic for about five hours - it nearly killed me with stiffness, and I could barely walk when I got home. I really enjoyed having the Jeep, but other recent “life” decisions (not moving to Nevada, not buying an RV to retire in), kind of helped me decide the Jeep needed to find a new home.

So yesterday I bought another BMW. It’s an X1, three year old lease return, still under warranty, loaded with conveniences, easy to drive, turbo engine makes it fast, and it’s a fun car to drive. Spouse loves riding in it, and it’s just “utility” enough to make me happy. With my impending retirement, I think it’ll be a great fit.

So the question is, did you (or do you plan to) get a different car for your retirement years? What did you switch out and what did you get? Curious to know if it’s just me. ;)

Dave

My brother just did the same with leasing a BMW SUV. He likes it, but just not crazy about what it would cost to fix things, as was his experience when he owned another BMW years ago and then had switched to the Chevy Equinox.

Now he is trying to find out how to register it in Florida as he is establishing permanent residency there for his retirement.

Anyway, we plan to keep our 2 SUV's for as long as possible and then at some point go down to having just one when we see how our life is when we move and hubby is retired.

When we need another car it will be a used one, but still an SUV to deal with the tough New England winters.

PS When I stopped working I got rid of my little Honda Fit, I loved it but it was that or the CRV and I chose to keep the CRV- mainly because it is an SUV and we have winter here and it also had less mileage.
 

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I’ve always been a utility vehicle person. Pickups, Jeeps, vans, SUVs and such were my preferred vehicle, rather than passenger cars. Add in a convertible sports car now and then for fun, and I was always happy.

And then I started to see the frailty of life. After my recent second knee replacement surgery, I’ve had a fair amount of trouble getting into, out of, and driving my Jeep Wrangler. My spouse has never been comfortable riding in it. I had to go to a doctor’s appointment late afternoon the day before Thanksgiving an hour south of me, and I was caught in stop and go traffic for about five hours - it nearly killed me with stiffness, and I could barely walk when I got home. I really enjoyed having the Jeep, but other recent “life” decisions (not moving to Nevada, not buying an RV to retire in), kind of helped me decide the Jeep needed to find a new home.

So yesterday I bought another BMW. It’s an X1, three year old lease return, still under warranty, loaded with conveniences, easy to drive, turbo engine makes it fast, and it’s a fun car to drive. Spouse loves riding in it, and it’s just “utility” enough to make me happy. With my impending retirement, I think it’ll be a great fit.

So the question is, did you (or do you plan to) get a different car for your retirement years? What did you switch out and what did you get? Curious to know if it’s just me. ;)

Dave
Definitely not just you! My wife retired in 2011, a couple years before me and she bought a Lexus RX450 hybrid. It was her retirement gift to herself. She and I both loved the RX and she still has it. In fact, I liked it so much, I also got an RX350, the gas model. They have both been great cars and are very comfortable. They’re small enough that they aren’t a chore to drive but large enough that we have plenty of room when we travel.

In fact, as I write this, I’m sitting in the back of my wife’s car as she drives me and our daughter to Emerald Grande in Destin for a few days.

So, I had never really thought about buying a new car when I retired but my wife had a great idea. And, Dave, apparently she isn’t the only one!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I have bad knees, but not quite ready for replacements yet. I have found getting into (and mostly out of) low passenger or sports cars to be a problem for some time. My personal vehicle is a 2008 Infiniti M45X, which sits a little higher than the average luxury sedan, and with the AWD sits even a little higher than the RWD M45S. It is very comfortable to get into and out of, since the front driver's seat automatically slides back on exit and entry, and then slides forward when the door closes. It is a great handling, powerful and very comfortable touring car. We just took it on a 4,000 km. (2,500 mi.) trip to Nova Scotia and back. However, as much as I love it and hate the though of giving it up, I will probably have to replace it in the next couple of years. So this topic is on our minds, too.

My wife's car is a fully-loaded 2016 Nissan Rogue SL AWD. With our climate here, I will not buy any vehicle that is not AWD. The Rogue is great for driving to places like South Carolina or Florida and staying in timeshares, since it has a much larger storage area than my Infiniti. While it does not have the blistering acceleration of the big V8, it also doesn't need premium gas and gets much better gas mileage. It is still a reasonably peppy and good-handling SUV with very comfortable seats for long-distance travel. And of course you sit up higher than in the Infiniti, which makes it easy for getting in and out of it. Both my wife and I also like the visibility in heavy traffic from sitting up higher, compared to her previous car, a Volvo V70 2.5T AWD wagon. Plus, the Rogue is also very practical at home for hauling things from the local nursery or building-supply store.

We like the flexibility of having two vehicles with different attributes, but we have discussed the idea of going to one vehicle once I am fully retired next year. If we do that, we will probably replace both vehicles with a slightly larger SUV, such as an Audi Q7 or Infiniti QX60. But we likely won't make that decision until at least it is time to replace my car.

@DaveNW I am curious why you find the Jeep Wrangler so difficult to drive? Is it a manual? I understand the issue of getting in and out of it, since you really have to climb up into it and then climb back down, even with running boards. However, you indicate it is hard to drive in heavy traffic. That is why I gave up manual transmissions about 30 years ago. I loved my 1983 Honda Prelude but it had a very heavy clutch and in heavy rush-hour traffic in Toronto I would get home and my left leg would be killing me!!
 

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I like the styling and driving of sedans and I will continue to drive one for our cruising while I can. That said, after we bought the Bolt EV for our around town car, it has seat height that is just sit and swing in. It is definitely an easy car to ingress/egress.
 

easyrider

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What I notice is most of my friends that retire trade their vehicle in soon after retiring. Many purchase a newer model of what they have. Some pay cash but many are using their SS checks for the payments.

The thing I find interesting is the price tags on new vehicles. A Ford 3/4 ton Truck cost about $70,000 before sales tax. A Ford Expedition is almost $80,000 before sales tax.

I would rather spend our money on travel and we are very happy with our old stuff but we might drive over to Canada to pick up a newer something in 2020.

Bill
 

DaveNV

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@DaveNW I am curious why you find the Jeep Wrangler so difficult to drive? Is it a manual? I understand the issue of getting in and out of it, since you really have to climb up into it and then climb back down, even with running boards. However, you indicate it is hard to drive in heavy traffic. That is why I gave up manual transmissions about 30 years ago. I loved my 1983 Honda Prelude but it had a very heavy clutch and in heavy rush-hour traffic in Toronto I would get home and my left leg would be killing me!!
Note that my Jeep was a 2-door Wrangler, the classic rag-top Jeep style, not a fancier Cherokee, Liberty, Renegade, or whatever other SUV-like urban vehicles they're making now. And I wish I could blame it on the transmission, but my Jeep was an automatic. It's kind of hard to properly describe the issue. For short drives around town, running errands and whatever, the Jeep was easy and great. Off-road driving wouldn't have been an issue, because I'd have been constantly readjusting my position in the seat, to make sure I was seeing everything around me. But for anything longer, like freeway driving, or in this most recent case - sitting in heavy, slow-moving traffic for a very long time, I found the Jeep was increasingly uncomfortable to sit in, and I found myself squirming, trying to get comfortable.

It probably has most to do with the angle and position of the seat. Jeep Wrangler seats are pretty utilitarian, and have few adjustments. The angle of the seat bottom, combined with the angle of the seat back, no bolster or lumbar support, pressure from hard seat springs under my lower thighs, the length of my legs (average for my height), combined with the longer length of my arms (quite long for my height), made it difficult to adjust the seat correctly for any sort of longer term driving experience. For the reasons I bought this Jeep, it wouldn't have been an issue. But for a long term daily driver, it just became more than I wanted to deal with. The increased issue after my knee surgery just sort of made me realize this was not the right long-term vehicle for me. :)

Dave
 

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DaveNV

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2020 Corvette.

Wouldn't that be fun, especially where you live? Not practical at all here in Northwest Washington, but a lot of fun to have. :)

Dave
 

x3 skier

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Didn’t buy a different type car after retirement but I do own two airplanes now:cool:

Cheers
 

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My brother just did the same with leasing a BMW SUV. He likes it, but just not crazy about what it would cost to fix things, as was his experience when he owned another BMW years ago and then had switched to the Chevy Equinox.
That is the downside I have heard on BMWs. I knew a guy who had used 7 series. It had a fan problem in the dash A/C and it was crazy expensive to fix it.
 

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Note that my Jeep was a 2-door Wrangler, the classic rag-top Jeep style, not a fancier Cherokee, Liberty, Renegade, or whatever other SUV-like urban vehicles they're making now. And I wish I could blame it on the transmission, but my Jeep was an automatic. It's kind of hard to properly describe the issue. For short drives around town, running errands and whatever, the Jeep was easy and great. Off-road driving wouldn't have been an issue, because I'd have been constantly readjusting my position in the seat, to make sure I was seeing everything around me. But for anything longer, like freeway driving, or in this most recent case - sitting in heavy, slow-moving traffic for a very long time, I found the Jeep was increasingly uncomfortable to sit in, and I found myself squirming, trying to get comfortable.

It probably has most to do with the angle and position of the seat. Jeep Wrangler seats are pretty utilitarian, and have few adjustments. The angle of the seat bottom, combined with the angle of the seat back, no bolster or lumbar support, pressure from hard seat springs under my lower thighs, the length of my legs (average for my height), combined with the longer length of my arms (quite long for my height), made it difficult to adjust the seat correctly for any sort of longer term driving experience. For the reasons I bought this Jeep, it wouldn't have been an issue. But for a long term daily driver, it just became more than I wanted to deal with. The increased issue after my knee surgery just sort of made me realize this was not the right long-term vehicle for me. :)

Dave
Yes, I knew it was a Wrangler, but not whether it was a 2-door or the 4-door Wrangler Unlimited. I did realize it was not one of the other models. I have rented most of the various Jeep models at one time or another and even considered buying a Wrangler for fun, but have taken it off the list since my knees have worsened, just due to the ingress and egress issues.

Have not really driven one recently for any lengthy trips, but the seat position/comfort issues make perfect sense to me. The comfort of the front seats has been an important factor in our car purchases. It is one of the reasons we chose the fully-loaded Rogue. The upgraded premium leather seats in the SL are larger and significantly more comfortable than the seats in the base model. My short-list when I bought the Infiniti was between a BMW 5-series and a Cadillac CTS-V. While the Cadillac had lovely seats, the choice eventually came down to the Bimmer vs. the Infiniti. For fewer dollars, the Infiniti had equipment not even available on the BMW, more power (unless I went to an M5) and IMO much more comfortable front seats, plus they are both heated and cooled! That's why it was my choice and I have never regretted it. It has been a very reliable car, too.

Like you, I now find seat position relative to wheel position, plus angle and height adjustment, but particularly leg and thigh support, to be crucial to comfort for drives of more than an hour and especially on long-haul trips. It is a critical factor to me on a car purchase now. Thanks for confirming!
 
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geist1223

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Went from a small S-10 Chev Pickup to Chev Silverado Crewcab Pickup with 6.5 Bed. Very comfortable for long drives. Also hauling more yard stuff in and out. Though we still take Patti's Subaru Forester for trips to Victoria and Vancouver BC. Small underground parking garages.
 

x3 skier

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Having owned two BMW X3’s, I’ve never had any real problems with repairs. The first has nearly 150000 miles and other than one big electronic repair under warranty and routine stuff like brakes, tires, etc and a couple of minor oil leaks, I’ve spent $1100 on one other repair to a rear axle. The other one has 43000 miles with zero maintenance costs except a set of tires.

Maybe I’m lucky:D

Cheers
 

DaveNV

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Like you, I now find seat position relative to wheel position, plus angle and height adjustment, but particularly leg and thigh support, to be crucial to comfort for drive's of more than an hour and especially on long-haul trips. It is a critical factor to me on a car purchase now. Thanks for confirming!
Yep. That says it more succinctly than I did. But it was definitely the larger problem with the Jeep. Loved the vehicle, but if we both couldn't be comfortable in it, comfort had to outweigh utility. This X1 has excellent seats, they're infinitely adjustable, and the seating angle is great. Looking forward to a long and happy experience with it.

Dave
 

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In my case I gave up my Mazda Miata sports car. It was easy to get into. I just pointed myself in the right direction and dropped. It became a bitch to get out of so I traded it in on a Mazda3 which has worked out fine...

George
 

DaveNV

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Having owned two BMW X3’s, I’ve never had any real problems with repairs. The first has nearly 150000 miles and other than one big electronic repair under warranty and routine stuff like brakes, tires, etc and a couple of minor oil leaks, I’ve spent $1100 on one other repair to a rear axle. The other one has 43000 miles with zero maintenance costs except a set of tires.

Maybe I’m lucky:D

Cheers

I think the opposite is true - those with chronic BMW issues were unlucky. I've owned a number of BMW's over the years, and never had a major issue. While repairs were expensive at the dealership (the "stealership" to some), the same could be said for most any car repair these days. Vehicles tend to be much more complicated than they used to be, and any weird repair can cost a lot.

Dave
 

DaveNV

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In my case I gave up my Mazda Miata sports car. It was easy to get into. I just pointed myself in the right direction and dropped. It became a bitch to get out of so I traded it in on a Mazda3 which has worked out fine...

George
I considered a hardtop convertible Miata MX-5 years ago, (fun, easy cars), but there was a box-like thing sticking out into the passenger footwell that made it impossible to fully straighten the passenger's legs. A dealbreaker for anyone driving with anybody else.

Dave
 

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We are just waiting for our 20 year old PT Cruiser to look sideways at us before sending it off to Kars for Kids. We could get along just fine with one car. If the move to the old folks home comes before the PT gives up the ghost, we'll sell it along with the 12 foot dining room table and other things that won't fit in a two bedroom apartment. Every other month or so Cliff tells me he's test driven a Miata or a Mini Cooper. The day we get rid of all our timeshares, or at least those further than a three hour drive, is the day I'd be happy to give up a larger car. Otherwise I have no interest in being the passenger in a tiny car all the way to Sedona.
 

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In my case I gave up my Mazda Miata sports car. It was easy to get into. I just pointed myself in the right direction and dropped. It became a bitch to get out of so I traded it in on a Mazda3 which has worked out fine...

George
I can definitely relate to that!!

I always thought the Miata was a brilliant concept and brought back fond memories of the MGBs of my youth. I decided to get into one at the annual Toronto car show a few years ago. I did virtually "drop" into it and it was actually surprisingly comfortable once I was in it. Then I had to figure out how to get up and out of it!?! And this was all done with the top DOWN. I had no idea of what contortions I might have to make in trying to do it with the top UP!!!

That made the fantasy of a purchase decision very easy. :doh::doh:
 
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WinniWoman

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I think the opposite is true - those with chronic BMW issues were unlucky. I've owned a number of BMW's over the years, and never had a major issue. While repairs were expensive at the dealership (the "stealership" to some), the same could be said for most any car repair these days. Vehicles tend to be much more complicated than they used to be, and any weird repair can cost a lot.

Dave
It is not that my brother had any problems with the BMW he used to own. It was just the routine maintenance and little things.

With the new BMW he has now, for examplem he has those tires that you can drive on for 50 miles when flat. Turns out he had a flat the other day (5000 miles on it) - a nail. I have not spoken with him since, but he was concerned that if they couldn't plug it for some reason, the tire would have to be replaced.
 

slip

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I also had a Jeep Wrangler. It was fun and something my son and I worked on and although my wife wasn’t real comfortable riding in it, she enjoyed it with the top down and even with the doors off.
But after we bought our condo on Molokai, I know it wasn’t coming to Hawaii. Being out in the middle of the ocean I knew I wanted something reliable and didn’t want to spend time tinkering knowing I wouldn’t have a garage. So a few months before I even knew we were moving I sold it. It sold fast and they hold their value pretty well.
My wife and I both have a Jeep Compass. We always thought they would be a nice vehicle for Hawaii. They are up off the ground a little for easy getting in and out. They both have nice upgrades, even sunroofs so they are fun. These are our second Compass and they have been good for us. We didn’t plan on bringing them to Hawaii but so far it has worked well.
When I retire, I will sell mine on Oahu and we will have my wife’s on Molokai. We Like that it is four wheel drive in case we have to cross the dip in the road when water is running through after heavy rains.
So we’ll see how this works out.
 

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Wouldn't that be fun, especially where you live? Not practical at all here in Northwest Washington, but a lot of fun to have. :)

Dave
Perfect for San Diego. Lots of mountain and desert roads and the Vista jail isn’t that far from my house.
 

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huh just got my first ever Toyota, a Highlander, was seriously thinking this was my retirement car:). Had a few Honda Accords in years prior, dealership here has disappointed me lately. But mostly wanted a AWD , and after seriously considering Subaru ended up with the Toyota. Time will tell
 

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It is not that my brother had any problems with the BMW he used to own. It was just the routine maintenance and little things.

With the new BMW he has now, for examplem he has those tires that you can drive on for 50 miles when flat. Turns out he had a flat the other day (5000 miles on it) - a nail. I have not spoken with him since, but he was concerned that if they couldn't plug it for some reason, the tire would have to be replaced.
RFTs (Run Flat Tires) aren't any better than any other tire, and a nail is a nail. Chances are the tire will need replacement. But if he has any sort of warranty on a tire with only 5000 miles on it, it should get replaced for him, at least at a prorated cost. It would depend on where he has the tire checked.

Dave
 
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