• The TUGBBS forums are completely free and open to the public and exist as the absolute best place for owners to get help and advice about their timeshares for more than 30 years!

    Join Tens of Thousands of other Owners just like you here to get any and all Timeshare questions answered 24 hours a day!
  • TUG started 30 years ago in October 1993 as a group of regular Timeshare owners just like you!

    Read about our 30th anniversary: Happy 30th Birthday TUG!
  • TUG has a YouTube Channel to produce weekly short informative videos on popular Timeshare topics!

    Free memberships for every 50 subscribers!

    Visit TUG on Youtube!
  • TUG has now saved timeshare owners more than $21,000,000 dollars just by finding us in time to rescind a new Timeshare purchase! A truly incredible milestone!

    Read more here: TUG saves owners more than $21 Million dollars
  • Sign up to get the TUG Newsletter for free!

    60,000+ subscribing owners! A weekly recap of the best Timeshare resort reviews and the most popular topics discussed by owners!
  • Our official "end my sales presentation early" T-shirts are available again! Also come with the option for a free membership extension with purchase to offset the cost!

    All T-shirt options here!
  • A few of the most common links here on the forums for newbies and guests!

Definitely not a domestic goddess

glypnirsgirl

TUG Review Crew: Expert
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2007
Messages
2,814
Reaction score
33
Location
Fort Worth, Texas
This weekend, inspired by the Breville pie maker thread, I decided to try my hand at making a few things. (ian doesn't see the point in buying kitchen gadgets when I cook less than once per month when we are at home. And I agree).

I tried two things: Martha Stewart's Macaroni and Cheese and a Chocolate Cake with Chocolate Ganache Frosting.

The macaroni and cheese was fabulous. The most intensely cheesy mac and cheese that I have ever eaten. I used her suggested mix of extra sharp cheddar and gruyere. Delicious. And fairly easy to make. The crust was especially good.

Ian bought 3 pounds of Callebaut Chocolate - the 99% chocolate - a month or so ago. He uses it to make hot chocolate in our blender.

I decided to use it to make chocolate cake. I used an epicurious recipe for the cake. The recipe called for 2 10" layers. I only have 9" cake pans, so I made 3 layers. They were thin, but looked okay in the pan.

Because I had 3 layers of cake, I decided to increase by 50% the amount of ganache.

Both recipes called for semi-sweet Callebaut and I was using the 99%. I found the substitution unsweetened chocolate for semi-sweet and added the additional sugar and fat.

The cake was thin, but okay. The ganache, disaster. It was too oily and the frosting "broke" - it separated into chocolate and butter instead of being incorporated. I decided to try to incorporate them and used my mixer and kept on adding confectioner sugar to try to get it to stick together. It sort of worked.

Once the cake was completely cool, I put it on the plate, and the first layer collapsed. No big deal. I frosted it anyhow. Added the second layer and the frosting just oozed out between the two. By the time that I added the third layer, I had chocolate "glop" rather than cake. The layers had slid around so much that they broke.

I ended up cutting the cake into pieces, not slices, and putting it into a high sided tupperware dish that we scooped the glop from. It was like those molten cakes, but without much cake.

It is the most intensely chocolate cake that I have ever eaten.

After the intensely cheesy macaroni and cheese, I am both cheesed-out and chocolated-out for awhile.

I am glad that others cooking adventures have been more positive.

elaine
 

BevL

TUG Lifetime Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2004
Messages
5,170
Reaction score
7
Location
BC Canada
You get full points in my book for trying. I honestly can't remember the last "new" thing I made, "from scratch."

As a matter of fact, I can't remember the last time I baked period.

So good on you!!
 

spirits

TUG Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2007
Messages
1,071
Reaction score
296
Location
Edmonton
Resorts Owned
Banff Rocky Mountain Resort
Wow good for you

I remember the first time I cooked a turkey for my boyfriend and parents. I looked at a recipe book for roasting chicken and thought an extra 1/2 hour would be plenty.:D
I think my father gently pointed out that turkey should not have a lot of red in the meat.:confused: My boyfriend obviously was more interested in my other talents because he eventually married me.
Point is all cooks were beginners once. You are learning from a great talent and are doing great. Keep on trying and the knowledge you will gain and the self satisfaction you will acquire will be priceless.
 

heathpack

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
4,684
Reaction score
3,840
Location
Rural Alabama
Resorts Owned
Hyatt Highland Inn
DVC Grand Californian and Hilton Head Island
Marriott Barony Beach and Mountainside
MVC Points
Super Easy Chocolate Cake and Icing

SIMPLE CHOCOLATE SHEET CAKE

MAKES ONE 9 BY 13-INCH CAKE
Melting the chocolate and butter in the microwave is quick and neat, but it can also be done in a heatproof bowl set over a saucepan containing 2 inches of simmering water. We prefer Dutch-processed cocoa for the deeper chocolate flavor it gives the cake. The baked and cooled cake can simply be served with lightly sweetened whipped cream or topped with any frosting you like.

INGREDIENTS
3/4cup cocoa powder , preferably Dutch-processed
1 1/4cups unbleached all-purpose flour (6 1/4 ounces)
1/4teaspoon table salt
8ounces semisweet chocolate , chopped
12tablespoons unsalted butter (1 1/2 sticks), plus extra for baking pan
4 large eggs
1 1/2cups granulated sugar
1teaspoon vanilla extract
1cup buttermilk
1/2teaspoon baking soda

INSTRUCTIONS
1. Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 325 degrees. Coat bottom and sides of 9 by 13-inch baking pan with 1 tablespoon butter.
2. Sift together cocoa, flour, and salt in medium bowl; set aside. Heat chocolate and butter in microwave-safe bowl covered with plastic wrap 2
minutes at 50 percent power; stir until smooth. (If not fully melted, heat 1 minute longer at 50 percent power.) Whisk together eggs, sugar, and vanilla in medium bowl.
3. Whisk chocolate into egg mixture until combined. Combine buttermilk and baking soda; whisk into chocolate mixture, then whisk in dry ingredients until batter is smooth and glossy. Pour batter into prepared pan; bake until firm in
center when lightly pressed and toothpick inserted in center comes out clean, about 40 minutes. Cool on wire rack until room temperature, at least 1 hour; serve, or ice with frosting.

CREAMY MILK CHOCOLATE FROSTING

MAKES ABOUT 2 CUPS
This frosting needs about an hour to cool before it can be used, so begin making it when the cake comes out of the oven.

INGREDIENTS
1/2cup heavy cream
pinch table salt
1tablespoon light corn syrup (or dark)
10ounces milk chocolate , chopped
1/2cup confectioners' sugar
8tablespoons unsalted butter (1 stick), cold, cut into 8 pieces

INSTRUCTIONS
Heat cream, salt, and corn syrup in microwave-safe measuring cup on high
until simmering, about 1 minute, or bring to simmer in small saucepan over medium heat. Place chocolate in workbowl of food processor fitted with steel blade. With machine running, gradually add hot cream mixture through feed tube; process 1 minute after cream has been added. Stop machine; add
confectioners´ sugar to workbowl and process to combine, about 30 seconds. With machine running, add butter through feed tube one piece at a time; process until incorporated and smooth, about 20 seconds longer. Transfer frosting to medium bowl and cool at room temperature, stirring frequently,
until thick and spreadable, about 1 hour.
 

pjrose

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2005
Messages
8,739
Reaction score
15
Location
Central PA USA
Intense chocolate glop sounds absolutely wonderful - I don't care what it looks like! Yummmmmmm:p
 

geekette

Guest
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
10,777
Reaction score
5,531
no kidding, I'm fine with glop! lemmee know when you test the next "intense chocolate" recipe as I will volunteer to be a taster.
 

glypnirsgirl

TUG Review Crew: Expert
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2007
Messages
2,814
Reaction score
33
Location
Fort Worth, Texas
Thanks for the encouragement!

I got home from work a few minutes ago and there was only 1/4 of the "cake" left. I asked Ian what had happened to the rest. He said he took it to work and shared it.

He just didn't tell anyone it was cake. He called it "decadent chocolate dessert" and it was a big hit - he brought our ice cream scoop to serve it with.

I guess alot of perception is about expectation.

The macaroni and cheese is all gone. The recipe made 12 generous servings. Both Ian and John ate it. John said that the cake and macaroni and cheese were all that he ate today and Sunday.

My next project is going to be chicken and dumplings ---- does anyone have a good recipe?

elaine
 

glypnirsgirl

TUG Review Crew: Expert
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2007
Messages
2,814
Reaction score
33
Location
Fort Worth, Texas
oh good grief --- read to the end

Heath = your recipe is not much different from what I started with:

For cake layers

3 ounces fine-quality semisweet chocolate such as Callebaut
1 1/2 cups hot brewed coffee
3 cups sugar
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 cups unsweetened cocoa powder (not Dutch process)
2 teaspoons baking soda
3/4 teaspoon baking powder
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
3 large eggs
3/4 cup vegetable oil
1 1/2 cups well-shaken buttermilk
3/4 teaspoon vanilla

[I think that the problem here was when I substituted Ian's 99% Callebaut chocolate for the semi-sweet chocolate, I had to add sugar and fat to make up the difference. I googled to see how to substitute and this is what I got
"1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa, plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar plus 1 tablespoon vegetable shortening." I didn't have any vegetable shortening, so I used butter.


For ganache frosting
1 pound fine-quality semisweet chocolate such as Callebaut
1 cup heavy cream
2 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons light corn syrup
1/2 stick (1/4 cup) unsalted butter

[I used the same substitution as above. I think the frosting just wasn't up to the addition of 8 ounces of butter and 8 tablespoons of sugar. ]

Well, in reprinting the recipe, I found what I did wrong with the cake. I used 8 ounces of chocolate instead of 3.
 

heathpack

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
4,684
Reaction score
3,840
Location
Rural Alabama
Resorts Owned
Hyatt Highland Inn
DVC Grand Californian and Hilton Head Island
Marriott Barony Beach and Mountainside
MVC Points
I came up with the following for your substitution: to substitute unsweetened chocolate for bitter or semisweet, decrease the amount of chocolate by 1/3 and add 2 teaspoons sugar per ounce of chocolate in the original recipe. The following disclaimer is offered: the more chocolate in the recipe the more problematic the substitution will be, because unsweetened chocolate contains more starch than bitter/semi, the texture of cakes in particular may be affected.

H

Heath = your recipe is not much different from what I started with:

For cake layers

3 ounces fine-quality semisweet chocolate such as Callebaut
1 1/2 cups hot brewed coffee
3 cups sugar
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 cups unsweetened cocoa powder (not Dutch process)
2 teaspoons baking soda
3/4 teaspoon baking powder
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
3 large eggs
3/4 cup vegetable oil
1 1/2 cups well-shaken buttermilk
3/4 teaspoon vanilla

[I think that the problem here was when I substituted Ian's 99% Callebaut chocolate for the semi-sweet chocolate, I had to add sugar and fat to make up the difference. I googled to see how to substitute and this is what I got
"1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa, plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugar plus 1 tablespoon vegetable shortening." I didn't have any vegetable shortening, so I used butter.


For ganache frosting
1 pound fine-quality semisweet chocolate such as Callebaut
1 cup heavy cream
2 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons light corn syrup
1/2 stick (1/4 cup) unsalted butter

[I used the same substitution as above. I think the frosting just wasn't up to the addition of 8 ounces of butter and 8 tablespoons of sugar. ]

Well, in reprinting the recipe, I found what I did wrong with the cake. I used 8 ounces of chocolate instead of 3.
 

heathpack

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
4,684
Reaction score
3,840
Location
Rural Alabama
Resorts Owned
Hyatt Highland Inn
DVC Grand Californian and Hilton Head Island
Marriott Barony Beach and Mountainside
MVC Points
Chicken & Dumplings Recipe

I have not tried this, it's in the pipeline. If you do make it, post back & let me know if it is good.

H

CLASSIC CHICKEN AND HERBED DUMPLINGS WITH AROMATIC VEGETABLES

Serves 6 to 8.** Published March 1, 1997.**

WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS:
Most chicken and dumplings recipes include flour, salt, and one or more of the following: butter, eggs, milk, and baking powder. We came upon one, however, that was unusual for its mixing method. It called for cutting butter into flour, baking powder, and salt but then, instead of just dumping cold milk right in, it called for heated milk. Suddenly we had our ideal dumpling—light and fluffy, yet durable enough to hold together during cooking. As for the rest of the chicken and dumplings recipe, we decided on a whole cut-up chicken rather than boneless breasts; the breasts may be a little easier to work with, but they don't provide as much flavor as a complete mix of white and dark bone-in meat. Next were the vegetables. Steaming them separately for 10 minutes worked well; we then just added them to the pot when the dish was about finished to heat them through (and keep them from overcooking).

A touch of heavy cream gives the dish a more refined look and rich flavor, but for a weeknight dinner, you may want to omit it. If you are in a hurry, you may poach boneless chicken breasts in low-sodium canned stock, then pull the breast into large pieces, and skip step 1 below.


INGREDIENTS
Poached Chicken with Creamed Gravy and Aromatic Vegetables
1 large roasting chicken , 6 to 7 pounds, butchered according to illustrations below
1 large onion cut into large chunks (unpeeled)
2 bay leaves
Table salt
3ribs celery , trimmed and cut into 1-by-1/2-inch pieces
4 carrots , peeled and cut into 1-by-1/2-inch pieces
6 boiling onions , peeled and halved
4tablespoons unsalted butter softened, or chicken fat from the cooked chicken
6tablespoons unbleached all-purpose flour
1teaspoon dried thyme
2tablespoons dry sherry or vermouth
1/4cup heavy cream (optional)
3/4cup frozen peas , thawed
1/4cup minced fresh parsley leaves
Ground black pepper or ground white pepper
Baking Powder Dumplings
2cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1tablespoon baking powder
3/4teaspoon table salt
1/4cup minced fresh parsley leaves , chives (or scallion greens), dill, and tarragon
3tablespoons unsalted butter
1cup milk
INSTRUCTIONS
1. For the Chicken: Heat deep 11- or 12-inch skillet or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add hacked-up chicken back, neck, and wings, and onion chunks; sauté until onion softens and chicken loses its raw color, about 5 minutes. Reduce heat to low, cover, and continue to cook until chicken pieces give up most of their liquid, about 20 minutes. Increase heat to medium-high, add 6 cups hot water, chicken parts (legs, thighs, and breasts), bay leaves, and 3/4 teaspoon salt, then bring to simmer. Reduce heat; continue to simmer, partially covered, until broth is flavorful and chicken parts are just cooked through, about 20 minutes longer. Remove chicken parts and set aside. When cool enough to handle, remove meat from bones in 2- to 3-inch chunks. Strain broth, discarding chicken pieces. Skim and reserve fat from broth and set aside 4 cups of broth, reserving extra for another use.

2. Meanwhile, bring 1/2-inch water to simmer in cleaned skillet fitted with steamer basket. Add vegetables; cover and steam until just tender, about 10 minutes. Remove and set aside.

3. For the Dumplings: Mix flour, baking powder, herbs, and salt in medium bowl. Heat butter and milk to simmer and add to dry ingredients. Mix with a fork or knead by hand two to three times until mixture just comes together. Following illustrations below, form dough into desired shape; set aside.

4. Heat butter or reserved chicken fat in cleaned skillet over medium-high heat. Whisk in flour and thyme; cook, whisking constantly, until flour turns golden, 1 to 2 minutes. Continuing to whisk constantly, gradually add sherry or vermouth, then reserved 4 cups chicken stock; simmer until gravy thickens slightly, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in optional cream and chicken and vegetables; return to simmer.

5. Lay formed dumplings on surface of chicken mixture; cover and simmer until dumplings are cooked through, about 10 minutes for strip dumplings and 15 minutes for balls and biscuit rounds. Gently stir in peas and parsley. Adjust seasonings, including generous amounts of salt and pepper. Ladle portion of meat, sauce, vegetables, and dumplings into soup plates and serve immediately.

TECHNIQUE
Dumplings


For biscuit-like dumplings, roll dough to 1/2-inch thick. Use a 2-inch biscuit cutter or a round drinking glass top to cut dough rounds.


For round puffy dumplings, divide dough into 18 pieces. Roll each piece of dough into a rough round.


For flat noodle-like dumplings, roll dough to 1/8-inch and cut them into about 2-by-1/2-inch strips.

STEP-BY-STEP
Cutting a Whole Chicken


1. With a sharp chef's knife, cut through the skin around the leg where it attaches to the breast.


2. Using both hands, pop each leg out of its socket.


3. Use your chef's knife to cut through the flesh and skin to detach each leg from the body.


4. A line of fat separates the thigh and drumstick. Cut through the joint at this point.


5. Using poultry sheers, cut down the ribs between the back and the breast to totally separate the back and wings from the breast.


6. Place a chef's knife directly on the breast bone, then apply pressure to cut through the bone and separate the breasts.


America’s Test Kitchen is a 2,500-square-foot kitchen located just outside of Boston. It is the home of Cook’s Country and Cook’s Illustrated magazines and is the workday destination for more than three dozen test cooks, editors, and cookware specialists. Our mission is to test recipes until we understand how and why they work and arrive at the best version. We also test kitchen equipment and supermarket ingredients in search of brands that offer the best value and performance. You can watch us work by tuning in to America’s Test Kitchen (www.americastestkitchen.com) on public television.
 

Icc5

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
1,957
Reaction score
586
Location
Los Altos, California (Northern Ca.)
Intese chocolate/lemon

no kidding, I'm fine with glop! lemmee know when you test the next "intense chocolate" recipe as I will volunteer to be a taster.

If you want intese flavor from either chocolate or lemon try making a crock pot cake. By the way, they work the best with the cheapest cake mix you can buy. My wife makes them all the time and I eat them when there is some left for me.
Bart
 

glypnirsgirl

TUG Review Crew: Expert
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2007
Messages
2,814
Reaction score
33
Location
Fort Worth, Texas
Still not a domestic goddess after 3 months of practice!

I tried this cake recipe again today for bonus son's birthday --- he knew that the first one was a failure and had enjoyed the glop. I told him I wasn't sure how it would turn out and explained the error that I had made the first time (the 8 oz for 3 oz "misread"). He knew what he was getting into.

I made sure that I followed the directions except I substituted (at John's request) 70% cacao for the semi-sweet - he prefers bittersweet flavor.

I did everything exact except for forgetting the vanilla extract in the cake (what do you do when you find an ingredient sitting on the counter and you have already poured the batter into pans?).

Except for the vanilla extract, everything is according to the recipe. And the cake is still TOO tender. I buttered the pans, lined with wax paper and buttered the wax paper. The cake STUCK in the pans. To get them out, I had to shake them out. Well, not surprisingly, the cakes broke.

I have them "glued" back together with the frosting. And for now, the cake looks fine. I had put it on my nice cake stand and managed to get the dome over it before the layers slid all over the place --- just in the nick of time.

So, I need your opinion. The cake is in the dome. I can put it into the refrigerator to harden up a little. And it might stay together. The recipe says, if you refrigerate it, bring it to room temperature before serving. I am thinking that I should leave it cold so I don't have to worry about it sliding --- what do you think?



elaine
 
Top