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Buy 2?

MelBay

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I'm seeing lots of Wyndham biennial weeks usage points on eBay. In my uneducated Wyndham mind, these seem much more reasonable than buying the same # of points in one lump resale sum, maintenance fees included.

Does it make any sense to buy an odd AND an even biennial week to get the # of points I want, if I can get reasonable or no closing? And what will Wyndham stick me for to "convert" or whatever they need to do to me to get me in the system?

Be nice to me, :D I'm new at this & just trying to figure out the best way to go about all this. And thanks in advance.
 

siesta

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Recent changes have biennial owners paying more in program fees than annual owners with the same alotment. Your best bet is to buy the points you need in an annual contract. If you were looking at a 308k biennial contract, just get a 154k annual (and utilize credit pool if you must). Btw, you shouldnt buy wyndham until you have spent some time on this specific board.

Also, you dont want to have to convert anything. IMO, one of the cleanest ways to get into wyndham is buying a UDI contract.
 
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vacationhopeful

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Please read the Primer by Goofyhobbie. It you find that confusing, just image the fustration of trying to figure out how to use your points while paying MFs monthly for several years before understand the system.
 

ronparise

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If something is cheap compared to the competition, you should look for the reason why...Often its because no one else wants it, and there is usually a reason why.

No; program fees are only a small part of what we call maintenance fees...its what we pay to run the points and reservations system. there ale also fees to manage and maintain the resort, property taxes and reserve funds...we pay all this stuff (usually) with one annual (or monthly) payment
 
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vacationhopeful

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Melbay,
Wyndham uses English quite well. Each word/name means a different function, option, and FEE. Newbies make the mistake, "oh, that ABC means the SAME AS xyz".

Keep reading. Then read some of the TUG threads where those words are used. My favorite line is "read the owner's manual 3 times; each time with a different colored marker".

Yes, it is like boring. But it is your money and knowing the system before you buy will help you avoid mistakes in how many points, APR, expected vacationing options, type of stays, exchanging, affiliate resort expectations, booking windows (preplanning), who should be listed on deed as an owner, etc. Wyndham's new $299 per deed transfer fee should help you to decide if you should buy 1 big deed or 2 or 3 smaller deeds building a portfolio. (Used to be $100 transfer fee; guess baby needed a new jet or 5).

Keep reading.

PS One of my friends invites me out to dinner IF I spend 20 minutes or so booking his Wyndham vacations or depositing points into RCI. He has a odd 168K deed and a converted fixed week deed for 140K in points. 20 minutes is a $20+ dinner. Keeps trying to give me all his points: NOT. Says Wyndham makes no sense to him and he was a school administrator for 35 years.
 

Cheryl20772

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Also, you have to pay title transfer fees for each contract you buy. If you get two bienniels you pay two transfer fees instead of one. In the long run, it's only about $300 more, but still....
 

hjtug

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possible fix for program fees on biennial contracts

The recent increase in program fees on biennial contracts seems to have depressed their resale value below equivalent annual contracts. Many biennial owners complained to Wyndham and there were some vague commitments that Wyndham would look into the issue. Recently there was a post on the Wyndham Owners Forum: http://forums.atozed.com/viewtopic.phpf=165&t=9511&st=0&sk=t&sd=a&start=45
where one owner reported a recent discussion with Wyndham where he got the feeling that the issue will be resolved in 2012.

If you find two biennial contracts that meet your desires as far as low maintenance fees and/or home resorts, then perhaps you could consider purchasing - if you verify that the program fee issue is truly fixed in 2012.
 
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