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Australian Scientists Discover New Dinosaur Species - the Kunbarrasaurus

MULTIZ321

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Australian Scientists Discover New Dinosaur Species - the Kunbarrasaurus - By Jonathan Pearlman, Sydney/ News/ World News/ The Telegraph/ telegraph.co.uk

" Scientists have discovered a new species of dinosaur that roamed around Australia – a heavily-armoured sheep-sized creature with a parrot-like beak.

The dinosaur, named Kunbarrasaurus, was identified following a 3D construction of the creature, whose remains were dug up in the outback in 1989.

The skeleton was one of the most complete set of dinosaur remains found in Australia and one of the world’s best-preserved fossils of an ankylosaur, a four-legged, herbivorous creature which had bones in its skin and was closely related to stegosaurs..."

Kunbarrasaurus_3520731b.jpg

The skeleton of Kunbarrasaurus was discovered in 1989 Photo: University of Queensland


Richard
 

DaveNV

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Ankylosaurs were always a favorite of mine as a kid. I figured they could swing the ball of bone at the end of their tails and break a Tyrannosaurs' leg. At least, they did when I was playing with my toy dinosaurs. ;)

Dave
 
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