• The TUGBBS forums are completely free and open to the public and exist as the absolute best place for owners to get help and advice about their timeshares for more than 27 years!

    Join tens of thousands of other owners just like you here to get any and all Timeshare questions answered!
  • TUG is asking for recent reviews of older resorts, earn a free year membership!

    Read more here
  • TUG has now saved timeshare owners more than $18,000,000 dollars just by finding us in time to rescind a new Timeshare purchase! A truly incredible milestone!

    Read more here: TUG saves owners more than $18 Million dollars
  • Follow the TUG Member Banner as it travels the world on vacation with Timeshare owners! Also sign up to get the banner sent to you so you can submit a photo of your vacation with the banner to share with TUG! Banner Thread
  • Sign up to get the TUG Newsletter for free! Join tens of thousands of other owners who get this every week! Latest resort reviews and the most important topics discussed by owners during the week!
  • Our official "end my sales presentation early" T-shirts are available again! Also come with the option for a free membership extension with purchase to offset the cost!

    Read more Here
  • A few of the most common links here on the forums for newbies and guests!

At what point are you too old to get a dog?

pwrshift

Tug Review Crew: Rookie
TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
5,528
Reaction score
28
Points
483
Location
Toronto
Resorts Owned
Marriott Manor Club - 3 weeks platinum, 2 weeks at Marriott Beachplace Towers, and 1 week at Marriott Canyon Villas
After almost 16 years, I lost my Dalmatian Tandy last June and not a day goes by without missing her. I think deep down I felt she was my last dog and still have her ashes and toys. http://vimeo.com/26736177

I'm at an age when I should downsize...the kids are gone and the large lot and house is quite a chore. The condo I really really like has a 'no pet policy' and I don't know if I can handle that restriction...they don't even allow visiting dogs.

Ive had a dog all my life so i know they are a lot of work...especially as puppies and at the end of their life. Perhaps it's not fair to get a dog when aging is slowing you down. I'll probably be in my 80's when today's puppy faces his end of life and I don't know how well I'd be able to emotionally face that then.

Any thoughts?

Brian
 
Last edited:

ronparise

TUG Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2011
Messages
12,573
Reaction score
2,004
Points
548
We got our two 11 years ago...I thought about it then....I remember thinking that Ill be 70 at the end of their lives...Now that Im 65 it dosent sound so bad...in fact I think Ive got one more dogs life in me....we will probably do it again. Although we will probably get an older dog, perhaps one left when its even older owner can no longer care for it
 

Passepartout

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2007
Messages
25,730
Reaction score
13,004
Points
1,149
Location
Twin Falls, Eye-Duh-Hoe
DW and I were just talking about that. Our Cocker Spaniel is 15 and clearly on the way out. She isn't feeding well, sleeps 20 or more hours a day. So far hasn't had many 'accidents'. She trembles a lot, is deaf, and has cataracts- or just doesn't see well. It's just a matter of time.

I asked DW if maybe we shouldn't consider going dogless for some unknown period after this one departs. I was told that she'd give me a couple of weeks and I'd be checking the shelter and breeders around the area. Could be. Life just isn't complete without a dog. I don't know. If the next one has about the same lifetime as the current one, We'll be 80ish. Could be a toss-up of who goes first. It's a tough decision. Maybe an adult dog a couple of years old this time. I'm not sure I want to put up with the puppy training.

Hope I don't have to make the decision soon.

Jim
 

NWL

TUG Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2008
Messages
1,297
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Location
Montana
Having pets, whether canine or feline (I have both), brings such joy into our lives. Tandy is a perfect example. If your present home is too much for you to take care of, and the condo you really like appeals to you, then what about a compromise? Volunteer at your local shelter. Walk the dogs, groom them, give them treats, cuddle with them. You'll have great companions and they will get lots of love until they find their "forever" homes. Everyone feels the love! :)
 

BevL

TUG Lifetime Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2004
Messages
5,170
Reaction score
7
Points
423
Location
BC Canada
We adopted our last dog. I mentioned in another thread that he's not my favourite of the dogs we've had but it's getting better and a big part of that was because he really was my husband's dog, pretty much until three years ago when I started being home full time. He was two when we got him, is 10 now and going strong. I really plan on adopting an older dog next time so that my kids hopefully don't have to worry about it. Not, like eight or nine old, but maybe four or five years old.

My parents in their mid 70s have a dog that is three years old - got it when it was six months old. Not sure what we're going to do if anything happens to Mom and Dad as we can't have two dogs in our condo.
 

JanT

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2005
Messages
2,678
Reaction score
1,228
Points
548
Ok, I've decided that I am only going to answer "dog related" posts on TUG while we are on our mission. I just can't help it. I love dogs.

Brian, my heart broke for you when you lost Tandy. I very well know the heartache that you feel - even now. We still have Sugar and Spice's ashes and always will. We miss those sweet dogs every day.

Anyway....I think there has to come a time when we realize that we are getting too old to take on puppies and even fairly young dogs. We don't want to have someone else take that responsibility on when we pass away and we certainly don't want someone just taking the dog to the animal shelter!! So, your age now puts you as a prime candidate for fostering a dog or adopting an older dog. Believe me, I have seen some beautiful and wonderful older German Shepherds at the rescue where we volunteer that would make wonderful companions. They deserve to live out their lives in comfortable homes but many people pass them by because they want a puppy or younger dog. So, for you adopting a dog that is a bit older would be wonderful - for you and the dog.

Since you mentioned that you have an apartment that you really love and want to move to but they don't allow pets, as someone else suggested volunteering your time at a rescue would be wonderful for you. And it would be wonderful for the dogs!!!! Believe me, volunteering at the rescue saved my sanity when we lost Sugar and Spice. We were able to help care for 25 to 75 German Shepherds at any given time. It was rewarding work and we have been so grateful for the time we spent there. It is the one thing that was very difficult for us to leave behind when we came out on our mission.

So, if you want that great apartment - go for it. Then volunteer at a rescue and have the time of your life! I promise!

Jan
 

pkyorkbeach

TUG Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2010
Messages
533
Reaction score
0
Points
16
Location
CT
Having a pet keeps you healthy and loved. If you move into the no pet condo you might not be happy.
 

jlf58

TUG Lifetime Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
568
Reaction score
11
Points
478
thats easy Brian, will it make you happy ? will the dog have a good life ? done and done ;)












































After almost 16 years, I lost my Dalmatian Tandy last June and not a day goes by without missing her. I think deep down I felt she was my last dog and still have her ashes and toys. http://vimeo.com/26736177

I'm at an age when I should downsize...the kids are gone and the large lot and house is quite a chore. The condo I really really like has a 'no pet policy' and I don't know if I can handle that restriction...they don't even allow visiting dogs.

Ive had a dog all my life so i know they are a lot of work...especially as puppies and at the end of their life. Perhaps it's not fair to get a dog when aging is slowing you down. I'll probably be in my 80's when today's puppy faces his end of life and I don't know how well I'd be able to emotionally face that then.

Any thoughts?

Brian
 

DebBrown

TUG Lifetime Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
2,485
Reaction score
128
Points
523
We were just discussing this too! We have two 60+ pound dogs right now. The question was whether we should downsize to smaller dogs next time. I'm in my 50's now and I wonder if I can handle walking a couple of large dogs when I'm 70? Maybe we need someone in the 20-30 pound range by then.

Anyway... when our last dog past away, we were dog-less for about two years. She had been sick and my mom was sick. I was just sick and tired of taking care of sick people all the time. Then DH wanted to look at condos. I knew I had to pick. If we were going to have another dog, we would not be moving some place without a yard. So I ended up with a cute little labradoodle puppy and kept the house. Then we started fostering and had a long string of dogs live with us until one fearful goldendoodle won our hearts. Now I can't imagine life without my doodles.

Deb
 

ace2000

TUG Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2006
Messages
5,032
Reaction score
151
Points
498
This is an interesting question that I would've never thought should have been considered.

Then last year my mother took in my grandmother, and moved her to a different city. Well, there was a big discussion about what to do with her three cats. My uncle basically said to just let them loose in the neighborhood ("they'll adapt"). Well, this brought my grandmother to tears, and to make a long story short, my grandmother and her three cats came to live with my mother.

I think the best approach is to do as previously suggested and take in an older pet. Not as much fun as a puppy, but it seems to be the right choice.
 

Pat H

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
3,460
Reaction score
54
Points
433
Location
Sun City Hilton Head
Resorts Owned
Brigantine
As we get older, we can get sick also. What will happen to the dog if you end up in the hospital or rehab even for a short period? Is there someone who will take care of the dog? Do you still travel? That is what keeps me from getting another dog.
 

stmartinfan

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2005
Messages
1,574
Reaction score
737
Points
473
Location
Minneapolis, MN
Resorts Owned
Divi Little Bay, St. Maarten
Another possibility if you move to the dog-less condo would be to partner with someone else on a pet. You may know someone who's older, has a pet, and needs some help with walking the dog, etc. My mother had a dog when she was in her 80s and couldn't really walk it regularly, but a neighbor kid who liked dogs would come over and play with it and take it for walks. You might be able to help someone else continue to keep their pet, while still getting your own "dog fix." While the recommendations to volunteer at a shelter are good, I think I'd also miss the bonding that happens when you're part of a dog's life on a regular basis.
 

dmharris

TUG Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2006
Messages
1,944
Reaction score
11
Points
398
Location
Butler, PA
I can't imagine my life without a dog in it. As I mentioned on the other thread about dog breeds, I've gravitated from larger dogs to medium to smaller size dogs over the years because they're easier in some ways. If we were hit by a truck (well I feel sorry for my daughters who will have to clean out my years of pack ratting) my daughters would take the dogs.

When our children were little we appointed guardians in case we both were hit by a truck, I guess the same principle should apply here; they are like children, aren't they? Find a friend you would trust and make a deal that you'll take their dog and they'll take yours if the need occurs.
 

presley

TUG Review Crew: Expert
TUG Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2011
Messages
6,300
Reaction score
1,100
Points
448
Should you forego on the condo, consider adopting a senior dog.

I have 5 dogs right now. One of them I adopted when he was 10. A little love and some healthcare, he now acts like he is 3. It was pretty awesome to get a dog that could already understand what I was saying and thinking.
 

siesta

TUG Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2010
Messages
3,456
Reaction score
25
Points
283
You are too old to get a dog when the dog is more likely to outlive you.
 

Carol C

TUG Lifetime Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
3,875
Reaction score
264
Points
418
Location
USA
You are too old to get a dog when the dog is more likely to outlive you.
That about sums it up! Brian, go for a dog when you're ready. You have a big heart and room in it for another dog...and goodness knows there are so many dogs that need good homes in these hard economic times. I've a bassett mix and three cats...and they all give me plenty of laffs when they play and chase around...and around. Curling up with one or more pets feels so good in the wintertime, too! You can't put a price on pet(s) and that kind of love, imho. Best wishes to you Brian, whatever you decide to do. :wave:
 

PStreet1

TUG Lifetime Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
2,077
Reaction score
43
Points
48
Location
Rosarito Beach, Baja, Mex., & Phx
I think Siesta is right--unless you have a home for him should you die before he does. My daughters would be able to take any pet of ours, but if they couldn't/wouldn't, then it wouldn't be fair to the pet.
 

JanT

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2005
Messages
2,678
Reaction score
1,228
Points
548
Ahhhhh....you have no idea how easily a person bonds with dogs at a rescue. Most dogs are there for a period of time. Some are adopted quickly but our rescue at times has had dogs there for almost two years before they are adopted. If a person volunteers regularly (such as one day a week), you would be surprised how quickly they bond with the dogs that are there. Rescue volunteering becomes a passion if you're an animal lover because you begin to understand how much they need love, affection, and care. And you just come to love them because you are an animal lover. They melt your heart and become very much like you're own dog.

We had one German Shepherd/Belgian Malinois mix that was at the rescue when we first started volunteering. The very first day I was there, I took him out of his kennel so it could be cleaned. He jumped gently up, put his front paws on my chest, and laid his head gently against my breast. He stayed there for quite awhile, shaking, and just yearning for love. I gave it to him that day and every day after that for as long as he was there. I loved that dog so much. Had we not have been leaving for an extended period of time I would have adopted him. He eventually was adopted and I was so happy I cried - as I did every time one of the dogs was adopted.

Volunteers are needed very badly in any rescue. I encourage anyone who loves animals to volunteer a little bit of their time. Believe me - it will be one of the most rewarding things you have ever done.


While the recommendations to volunteer at a shelter are good, I think I'd also miss the bonding that happens when you're part of a dog's life on a regular basis.
 

persia

Guest
Joined
Nov 18, 2007
Messages
1,179
Reaction score
6
Points
36
Location
Carlingford, NSW
Don't put your dog in a carrier, tie it to the roof of your car and drive to Florida. Especially if you are thinking of running for POTUS some day.....
 

Cheryl17

TUG Review Crew: Rookie
TUG Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
239
Reaction score
0
Points
226
Location
IL
You are too old to get a dog when the dog is more likely to outlive you.
I agree that it's very important to have a plan, but advancing age doesn't have to prevent you from adopting. Some no-kill shelters want the dogs and cats they adopt out back if you no longer are able to care for them. That's one reason some shelters will only adopt locally.
 

stmartinfan

TUG Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2005
Messages
1,574
Reaction score
737
Points
473
Location
Minneapolis, MN
Resorts Owned
Divi Little Bay, St. Maarten
I agree that it's very important to have a plan, but advancing age doesn't have to prevent you from adopting. Some no-kill shelters want the dogs and cats they adopt out back if you no longer are able to care for them. That's one reason some shelters will only adopt locally.
Yes, the adoption paperwork we signed with the rescue group included that stipulation in it - you're supposed to let them know if you're unable to keep the dog, and not just give it away yourself without involving them. (Since they don't really keep in contact with us, I doubt there's much that happens if you give the dog away, but it does reinforce that they would also take one back if necessary.)
 

pjrose

Tug Review Crew: Rookie
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2005
Messages
8,739
Reaction score
14
Points
323
Location
Central PA USA
I would consider an older dog rather than a puppy, and perhaps fostering rather than adopting. As JanT points out, there are so many wonderful dogs that are passed by because they're no longer puppies. And just think, no puppy puddles! Our first dog was an older dog, a beautiful cocker with a sign on her cage saying "8 years old, NO CHILDREN". While the shelter was noisy with all the big barking dogs, this little girl was just sitting and shaking. Our kids were teens, and we were able to convince the shelter to let us have her once we brought the kids to play with her for a few hours. She never got over her fear of men and brushes.....obviously she had some bad memories, and we were happy we could give her a chance for a good home during the second half of her life.

When she started going downhill we started fostering. Fostering has been wonderful for us; we're on about our 15th or so foster (several dogs, but now cats). Many are in need of love and security to get over issues such as neglect or mistreatment in the past, many have medical issues, and some are just perfect - but either way, you are giving a "throwaway" animal a second chance at life, getting it ready for a real home. Right now I have an extremely purry kitty next to me, apparently oblivious to the fact that he had eyelid surgery yesterday (the fur was rubbing his eye). He is now wearing a cone on his head and won't stop purring and kneading. Rescue has allowed this kid to get the surgery he needed and good food in his tummy, instead of a life of discomfort and possibly eventual blindness on the streets.

Sometimes giving up the fosters has been hard; our organization has many "foster failures" who adopted their fosters. One one hand it's been difficult, but on the other hand we have a say in whether we think the potential adopter is a good match, and we've said goodbye to our fosters with smiles as well as some tears. And then we get another one - or two - or three....

And if/when you feel that you really are too old to handle a dog, then you stop fostering.

PJ
 
Last edited:

glypnirsgirl

Tug Review Crew: Rookie
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2007
Messages
2,811
Reaction score
26
Points
283
Location
Fort Worth, Texas
How old are you now? Your life expectancy may be longer than you think. If your are a 65 year old man, your average life expectancy is 81.8 years. There are more detailed life expectancy calculators that take into consideration age, medical history, family medical history, stress factors, exercise, driving habits and lifestyle.

I am currenlty 57 and I scored 102. My husband is 56 and scored 85.

I did not grow up with dogs (my mother, grandmother and aunts were all afraid of them). My dog that died recently is the only dog I have ever had. I miss her terribly. I thought that I would never want another one and I am finding I am already yearning for another one.

elaine
 

heathpack

TUG Review Crew: Veteran
TUG Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
4,355
Reaction score
2,877
Points
448
Location
Los Angeles
Resorts Owned
Hyatt High Sierra and Highland Inn
Disney’s Grand Californian and Hilton Head Island
Marriott Barony Beach and Mountainside
Sheraton Broadway Plantation
How old are you now? Your life expectancy may be longer than you think. If your are a 65 year old man, your average life expectancy is 81.8 years. There are more detailed life expectancy calculators that take into consideration age, medical history, family medical history, stress factors, exercise, driving habits and lifestyle.

I am currenlty 57 and I scored 102. My husband is 56 and scored 85.

I did not grow up with dogs (my mother, grandmother and aunts were all afraid of them). My dog that died recently is the only dog I have ever had. I miss her terribly. I thought that I would never want another one and I am finding I am already yearning for another one.

elaine
Yay, I am going to live to be 92 and can therefore obtain my last puppy at the age of 78 by my calculation, my last young adult dog at 80. Hopefully I do not get hit by a bus.

Elaine- get another dog for sure. Lifes to short to do without.

H
 
Top