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35mm film/print scanners

JeffW

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I'm looking for the best (well, at least a good) way to scan old 35mm pictures. 95% of my pictures are 4"x6" prints, with negatives. I have a color flatbed scanner, but I don't think for as many pictures as I have, it's a practical way to do it. I saw a film/slide to picture scanner in a Sears ad this week, so I'm wondering if that means that these types of scanners are more mainstream.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Jeff
 

Talent312

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I think so... They scanning photos to image file that stored on a disk or edited and saved on your computer in .jpg format. I wouldn't bother printing them. Instead, I'd upload 'em to snapfish or some other photo service to be printed and delivered.

And now for something completely different:
I recently saw a cassette tape player with a USB interface for converting tapes to audio files.
 
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DaveNV

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Here's two standalone types I've got my eye on. http://www.costco.com/Common/Search...e=1_en-_-Top_Left_Nav-_-Top_search&lang=en-US

I like the Imagebox version because it has a small flatbed scanner built into it, and it can save a 9 megapixel image. I asked Santa to bring me one so I can handle the gazillion negatives I own - the accompanying prints are long gone, and I need to see what I have so I can have Costco reprint the ones I want. I like using Costco's online upload and print service, because if I don't like the images, I can get the cost refunded. That way I only pay for what I choose to keep.

Dave
 

Kay H

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And now for something completely different:
I recently saw a cassette tape player with a USB interface for converting tapes to audio files.


I'd be interested in converting VCR tapes to DVDs. Any help with this?
 

pwrshift

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I'd be interested in converting VCR tapes to DVDs. Any help with this?

I assume you have a VCR player which you could connect to a DVD recorder and copy one at a time. I have a Sony similar to the link below that works pretty well but can be a little more frustrating than the reviews say. This a straight copying machine that makes a DVD of your tape in real time...meaning it takes 2hrs to convert 2hrs. If you want to do some fancy editing you can get some cheap software for your computer to convert the DVD you've made to an editable video file (avi or mp4) and work with Windows Movie Maker to add titles, take out bad parts, etc. you're looking at a lot of time in this process. In addition, it's important to understand your copy will never be any better than the original...but if they're home movies they're priceless.

http://www.amazon.com/Sony-VRDMC6-D...P85K/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1322447289&sr=8-1

http://www.aimersoft.com/dvd-to-mp4-converter.html
 

dioxide45

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The one thing I don't like about our Canon 8800F flatbed with 35mm film guide is that you have to keep removing and inserting film in to the guides. It scans wonderful digital photos, but if you are trying to scan a lot, you get wore out before long. We wanted something that would scan decent enough photos that we could order decent photobooks and this does the trick. Just trying to convert years worth of negatives it painful.
 

pwrshift

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I'm looking for the best (well, at least a good) way to scan old 35mm pictures.

I have an Epson V600 which has a large enough flatbed to copy maybe 5 photos (4x6") into your computer but you have to scan them one by one, and I'm not aware of any automated way to convert prints.

http://www.amazon.com/Epson-Perfection-Photo-Scanner-B11B198011/dp/B002OEBMRU

Slides and negative film can be done on it too, but it's a long process if you've got a lot to do like I have. You might want to get a light table with magnifier to inspect all the film to attempt to decide which picture are worth scanning. I have about 3000 slides which made me decide 'family comes first' and not bother with scenic slides. That cut way down on the numbers but there are a lot. The scanning process takes a long time too once you've got what you want done first...and figured out the resolution requirements. For family members some of them are simply priceless and even better if edited with Photosop Elements to remove dust, scratches, etc. or to improve colour. Have fun.
 

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I'd be interested in converting VCR tapes to DVDs. Any help with this?

I did this several years ago using a VCR and a DVD player/recorder hooked together thru an AV-Receiver. But it is possible to use your computer to capture VHS video, edit it and burn DVD disks.

The process is a bit complicated as you'll need to buy an analog capture device or graphics card with capture/conversion capability, gobble up a ton of HD space, and then use software (usually the hardware comes with some) to edit or save it on your HD and then burn a DVD.

Product reviewers can help you choose, but for a short list, check out http://vhs-to-dvd-converters-review.toptenreviews.com/
 
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Kay H

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My son did us the favor of throwing out our vcr when he connected our cd player. QVC had a sony gadget that you could put your tape in one slot and your DVD in another slot, and transfer it. They do not have one listed now. Don't know if they will get more but I'll keep checking their website.

Thanks for your suggestions but sounds a little too complicated for me. I might just be stuck.
 

IngridN

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I have an Epson V600 which has a large enough flatbed to copy maybe 5 photos (4x6") into your computer but you have to scan them one by one, and I'm not aware of any automated way to convert prints.

http://www.amazon.com/Epson-Perfection-Photo-Scanner-B11B198011/dp/B002OEBMRU

Slides and negative film can be done on it too, but it's a long process if you've got a lot to do like I have. You might want to get a light table with magnifier to inspect all the film to attempt to decide which picture are worth scanning. I have about 3000 slides which made me decide 'family comes first' and not bother with scenic slides. That cut way down on the numbers but there are a lot. The scanning process takes a long time too once you've got what you want done first...and figured out the resolution requirements. For family members some of them are simply priceless and even better if edited with Photosop Elements to remove dust, scratches, etc. or to improve colour. Have fun.

This thread is very timely as I have spent a good deal of time this Tday weekend researching photo/negative scanners as well as audio conversion units.

I'm debating between the Epson V500 and V600. I want the excellent quality these type of flatbed scanners offer, however, am concerned about the time needed to scan my thousands of negatives. The feeder-type scanners offer the speed, however, the quality is nowhere as good. On the other side, all of the negatives have been printed so another time-saving option with the V500/600 may be to scan the photos themselves rather than the negatives.

I am going to purchase the Innovative Technology Aviator 5 in 1 Wooden Music Center which will allow me to convert my hundreds of LPs as well as cassettes to CDs.

http://www.amazon.com/Aviator-Wooden-Music-Center/dp/B003WTLAA0/ref=pd_rhf_se_p_t_2

Santa is into electronics this year...I ordered a Canon Power Shot Elph 310HS to replace my 400. I wanted the 8x optical zoom for kitty pictures :D .

Now if DH can only figure out how to work the VCR to DVD converter he bought years ago to convert our wedding video :wall: . Santa may have to get him one of those too :rofl: .

Ingrid
 

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I have the V600, and it is great. It is the scanner I've been using to scan about 1000 old family photos for the online gallery. What I've been doing is maybe 20-30 of them while watching the games, or while watching TV. It'll do 4 at a time of 4x6, more of smaller prints. You can knock off 100 in an evening, easy.

Regarding the included photo correction software, for the most part it is decent, if your photos aren't too old and faded. The scratch and tear correction is not bad, but sometimes it will do strange things like interpret a smile as a scratch and remove it.
 

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Epson V500 here. I'm slowly working my way through about 50 carousels of slides, converting to digital. So far I've been pretty pleased.

I think you'd not be pleased with the results if you just scan in from prints. The resolution of the print is far less then the resolution of the original film, especially if they are just snapshot sized prints. Scanning in from enlargements - the larger the better to preserve as much detail as possible - will give far better results.
 

hvsteve1

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For dubbing VCR to DVD there are a number of such units available, including some at Walmart and Amazon. You can get refurbished for well under $100 and new ones for a little over. I have a Toshiba that works well, especially since these units typically have a one-touch dubbing button. As video tape is not digital, it will always require dubbing in real time. Roxio sells a program for about $60 that includes a USB dongle to connect to your VCR and converts the tape to a digital file.
 

Mosca

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Epson V500 here. I'm slowly working my way through about 50 carousels of slides, converting to digital. So far I've been pretty pleased.

I think you'd not be pleased with the results if you just scan in from prints. The resolution of the print is far less then the resolution of the original film, especially if they are just snapshot sized prints. Scanning in from enlargements - the larger the better to preserve as much detail as possible - will give far better results.


Not really, Doug. Remember, this person is scanning for the screen; he ALREADY HAS prints, and negatives, so he doesn't need the high resolution necessary for good prints. If he wants more prints, he can make them from the negatives he already has.

Prints scan for screen quite nicely at 96 or 150 dpi. At 200, they start getting too large for most peoples' monitor settings.
 

Kay H

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For dubbing VCR to DVD there are a number of such units available, including some at Walmart and Amazon. You can get refurbished for well under $100 and new ones for a little over. I have a Toshiba that works well, especially since these units typically have a one-touch dubbing button. As video tape is not digital, it will always require dubbing in real time. Roxio sells a program for about $60 that includes a USB dongle to connect to your VCR and converts the tape to a digital file.


Thanks. Steve but i don't have a VCR anymore. Maybe I can find a friend who has one and borrow it.
 

Talent312

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Thanks. Steve but i don't have a VCR anymore. Maybe I can find a friend who has one and borrow it.

I have a couple of 'em in my garage...
As my wife says about her old clothes: "Maybe it will come back in style." :p
 

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I have been following the thread. It sounds like the Epson unit is perhaps higher quality, but more difficult to use. I'm sort of torn:

- as pointed out, I'm just creating digital copies, so I don't necessarily need 'archive' quality
- on the other hand, I'd hate to go thru all my photos (likely becoming the new reference source), and realize that for a little extra work up front, I'd have much better pictures

I don't think there's a lot of restoration that needs to be done. I think I'd be more concerned with general color rendition and clarity (and hopefully no artifacts).

I did end up ording the Imagebox one from Costco. It's price included free shipping, so If I use it and am not satisfied with it, I don't lose shipping fees if I return it to my local Costco (plus, Costco lets you do almost unlimited returns, so I don't have to decide on it within 30 days).

I'll probably read some more on the Epson, maybe take a look at it in person (Best Buy seems like they carry it).

Jeff
 

pwrshift

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Jeff...as soon as you start with this project on any type of scanner you're going to see how much time it will take to do all your pictures. For tis reason I again want to say you'd be wise to start some sort of method of looking at the slides you definitely want to archive using a slide projector rental if you don't have one. At the very least use a magnifying glass on some sort of lightbox to help.

Negative and positive films are more difficult but a lightbox and magnifying glass will help a lot.

Regarding quality, if they are family treasures I'd go for 100% sized copies of the source photo in 300 dpi from prints and then you've got a treasure rather than just so-so. If you have the negative film of those prints use them but at a much higher dpi resolution so they can blow up without grain. For real treasures, only the best quality will do. Higher resolutions take more time so make sure you've got something else to do in the wait time. :)

Brian
 

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Arghhhhhh...I forgot to order a slide viewer. Any thoughts on the best place to pick on up? The Epson V600 is on its way from Amazon. In addition to free shipping and no taxes, DH got a $5 gift certificate because they had problems on Black Friday and DH never was able to order his merchandise.

I'm willing to take the additional time to get really good digital copies of all of our slides as well as 50+ year old photos that I want to copy and send to my brothers.

Ingrid
 

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The Epson is pretty easy. You plug it in, install the drivers from the CD, and then it's one click. The Imagemate might be better and easier, but there's nothing hard about using the Epson.
 

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If you want good resolution you'll need something like the Nikon CoolScan V eBay item here. Not cheap - I can suggest you buy it with a friend who needs to scan too.
 

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Other than potential quality differences, any comments on standalone vs connected to a computer? At first I thought connected to a computer would be better: higher quality, no reason to pay for a screen or memory. But a standalone box (assuming you scan to memory card, then transfer that to a computer) would make it easier to lend to a family member, to let them do their own photos. Not nearly as easy to do that with a USB scanner.

Jeff
 

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Other than potential quality differences, any comments on standalone vs connected to a computer? At first I thought connected to a computer would be better: higher quality, no reason to pay for a screen or memory. But a standalone box (assuming you scan to memory card, then transfer that to a computer) would make it easier to lend to a family member, to let them do their own photos. Not nearly as easy to do that with a USB scanner.

Jeff

I guess it really depends on what each buyer is looking for. If you want portability and convenience over quality, then a standalone unit might make sense. If you want an end product that will produce pictures that rival prints from your negative and software that fixes flaws, then the scsi/usb devices would be your choice. A little written 'pro/con' sheet should get you to the type of device best suited to your needs.
 
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