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‘Once-in-a-lifetime’ explosive event in space expected soon

DrQ

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‘Once-in-a-lifetime’ explosive event in space expected soon: What to know

The ‘rare nova explosion’ of T CrB

Roughly every 79 years, there is an explosive event in the Northern Crown, a binary system roughly 3,000 light-years away from Earth. Nestled within the star system is the nova, T Coronae Borealis, otherwise known as the Blaze Star or T CrB.
 

Passepartout

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Can somebody explain to me like I'm a first grader how, if this event is some 3,000 light years away, the Nova actually happened 3,000 years ago, and the light is finally getting here, how do 'scientists' know?

Jim
 

DrQ

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Brace for Impact: A Stellar Explosion Is About to Light Up Earth's Sky​

Astronomers say that an imminent nova explosion from a binary star system should be visible to the naked eye.
Can somebody explain to me like I'm a first grader how, if this event is some 3,000 light years away, the Nova actually happened 3,000 years ago, and the light is finally getting here, how do 'scientists' know?

Jim
To answer you query:
The white dwarf, which is the dead remnant of a star, is about the size of Earth but has the same mass as the sun. Meanwhile, the aging red giant is a dying star that's shedding material out into space. The white dwarf's massive gravitational pull is hauling in the ejected material from the red giant. Once the white dwarf has accumulated enough material, the heat increases so much that it causes a runaway thermonuclear reaction. That explosion is called a nova.​
The prior nova from this star system occurred in 1946. It's a cycle that's been going on since it was first discovered more than 800 years ago.
constellations-1.jpg
 

Passepartout

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To answer you query:
The white dwarf, which is the dead remnant of a star, is about the size of Earth but has the same mass as the sun. Meanwhile, the aging red giant is a dying star that's shedding material out into space. The white dwarf's massive gravitational pull is hauling in the ejected material from the red giant. Once the white dwarf has accumulated enough material, the heat increases so much that it causes a runaway thermonuclear reaction. That explosion is called a nova.​
The prior nova from this star system occurred in 1946. It's a cycle that's been going on since it was first discovered more than 800 years ago.
Good explanation. So this isn't it's first rodeo. I may set out the lawn chairs, but won't start the popcorn yet. Thanks
 
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