*ads are disabled when logged in*
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. We completed the upgrade of the TUGBBS forums recently and are still working on issues/customizations/changes etc. Please post in the thread in the ABOUT TUGBBS section with your feedback. Note if you are unable to log in or access the forums please email us at tug@tug2.net!
    Dismiss Notice
  3. With the upgrade to the new forum, tapatalk is not functioning properly and we have had little to no support from them in fixing the problem. That said, the new forum is fully configured to support mobile devices so if you are missing being able to visit TUG on your phone try disabling tapatalk and just using your phone/tablet browser to see the new look!
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Sign up to get the TUG Newsletter for free! Join tens of thousands of other owners who get this every week! Latest resort reviews and the most important topics discussed by owners during the week!
    Dismiss Notice
  5. Follow the TUG Member Banner as it travels the world on vacation with Timeshare owners! Also sign up to get the banner sent to you so you can submit a photo of your vacation with the banner to share with TUG! Banner Thread
    Dismiss Notice

Sticky - How to Rent Your Timeshare

Discussion in 'Buying, Selling, Renting' started by admin, Apr 9, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. admin

    admin Administrator

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2004
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    How to Rent Your Timeshare Updated 3/28/08 by Dave M.

    Want to rent your timeshare week out? Don’t know where to start? Don’t know how much to ask or where to advertise or whether to pay an up-front listing fee? Check the TUG Advice section (link at the top of this page) for pertinent articles and read the info that follows:

    Note that although you can generally rent a week that you own at your own resort (a very few resorts restrict rentals), the rules for most exchange companies prohibit rentals of weeks obtained through the exchange company, whether obtained as an exchange, Bonus week, Getaway, Last Call, One Plus One, etc.

    Start by determining how much rent you should ask for your week.
    • Call the resort and, acting as though you want to rent a unit for your use, ask how to find a rental and what the rates are for the week you have in mind. The resort may have a rental program and may be able to give you a $$ amount.
    • Also ask your resort for rates for weeks in other seasons or ask them to fax you a rate sheet, showing rental rates for all seasons. You'll soon see why you need that info.
    • Ask the resort if they know of any realtors or other entities that rent out weeks. Follow up on these leads.
    • Check the Sunday newspaper for the resort area for “timeshare rental”, “vacation rental” or “short-term condo rental” classified ads of realtors or individuals that list weeks available for rent at your resort or at other nearby resorts. Call realtors that have ads, even if such ads are not for your resort, and ask what rates would be at your resort (for your week, of course).
    • Next do a Google.com search, using the name of your resort (in quotes if more than one word), and various words such as timeshare, rent or rental, and the name of the state in which the timeshare is located. Mix and match these terms to come up with different sites that might list rentals for your resort. Here, as with some other sources, you'll need to do some interpolation of rates, because (for example) that week 27 on the beach listed for rent will fetch a much higher rent than your week 20 in cooler weather before school gets out. That's what the rate sheet that you get from the resort is for - to make comparisons.
    • Search TUG and the other rental sites in this list of rental and resale sites frequently mentioned positively by TUGgers for rentals at your resort.
    • Search current and closed auctions at eBay for rentals at your resort, using some of the same search terms as in your Google search.
    • Check the Getaway or Bonus week inventory at II or RCI for the location and dates for your planned to rental. If there are such weeks available for rent in the same general area as your resort, you might have trouble renting your week, even if your week is at a different resort. Take those rental prices into account in setting your price.

    After you have gathered as much evidence as you can on what similar weeks at your resort rent for, consider that you likely don't have the same advertising clout that the resort and some other listings do. If you choose to use any or many of the sources you have searched to advertise your week, you should be able to get as much rent as anyone else on that site. But if you really want to rent it, price it below what others are asking and definitely at least 25%-40% below what your resort asks for similar rentals.

    Where should you advertise? The work you will have done above should provide all of the info you need to determine the best places to advertise.

    To enhance your chances for a successful rental experience, here are three additional suggestions:
    • Never ever pay an up-front fee (except for a nominal $15-$30 classified ad fee) to list your week for rent. TUGgers' experience is that success rates after making such payments are between poor and non-existent!
    • Read the entire article on How to Sell Your Timeshare in the separate "sticky" thread on this forum. The principles in that article for (1) up-front fees, (2) where to list your week, (3) scams to avoid, (4) timely and accurate information, and (5) cold calls from those asking for a fee to sell your week for you all apply equally to rentals.
    • There are three sample rental agreements in the TUG Advice section (link at the top of any TUG page) under "Renting Timeshares". Also, Timesharing Today has sample rental contract documents (and instructions for closing your deal) that you can order or download for about $10.

    Some would suggest listing your week for rent for the amount of your maintenance fees. Unfortunately, there is rarely a direct correlation between such fees and the fair rental value of your week. If you really want to rent it, offer it at a price that will get it rented!

    Here is some additional advice posted by PerryM in November 2005 on one of the BBS forums:

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 28, 2008
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page